Orientation and Personality



  • A while ago I was talking to some buddies about WTF interviews. One of us mentioned this case, in which his company was hiring people for a position as a C# developer.

    The interview was in English (the company is located in Brazil, but some of its customers are in Europe and US). So the interviewer asks the candidate about his knowledge of OOP. The story goes on like this:

    "Oh-wow-pi? Sorry, I don't know about that language."

    "But this position involves programming with C#. Have you never worked with an objected oriented language, like Java for example?"

    "Oh, object orientation! Yes, I can orient these languages to objects!"

    Renan's note: we've just found the compass man (to orient, according to the dictionary).

    Also, they asked him about things such as polymorphism, code reuse, design patterns etc. The one part of it that caught my ear was this. They asked him about inheritance. The following is an incomplete excerpt of what I remember of it, but the funny thing is the concept the guy must have had in his mind.

    Yeah, inheritance... You know, every programmer writes code in a different style. You may look at some piece of code, and it's all idented and neat, but you see that the coder put no spaces between variables and signs. Or that other piece of code looks polluted, but it has lots of helpful comments. Some people use camel case, some don't. You can actually tell who among your colleagues wrote that piece of code by its style, almost as if you were seeing their handwriting. You can tell who wrote that code, for the code has inherited the personality of its author.

    When I think about how maintainable this guy's code must be, I immediately remind myself of my signature here.



  • "Code reuse? Oh yes, I copy+paste all the time."



  • yes, I've once heard about a Computer Science university professor that wrote a book called "Programming with oriented objects"..



  • @wf_tmro said:

    "Programming with oriented objects"..
     

    Chapter 1: Leftward Orientation

    Chapter 2: Rotational Righthand Orientation

    Chapter 3: Homosexual Orientation

    Chapter 4: Cartesian code considerations in a dimensional IDE

    Chapter 5: Presentation, Business, Data: The Three Axes of Application Orientation


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @dhromed said:

    @wf_tmro said:

    "Programming with oriented objects"..
     

    Chapter 1: Leftward Orientation

    Chapter 2: Rotational Righthand Orientation

    Chapter 3: Homosexual Orientation

    Chapter 4: Cartesian code considerations in a dimensional IDE

    Chapter 5: Presentation, Business, Data: The Three Axes of Application Orientation

    Chapter 6: Murder on the Orient Express



  • @PJH said:

    @dhromed said:

    @wf_tmro said:

    "Programming with oriented objects"..

    Chapter 1: Leftward Orientation

    Chapter 2: Rotational Righthand Orientation

    Chapter 3: Homosexual Orientation

    Chapter 4: Cartesian code considerations in a dimensional IDE

    Chapter 5: Presentation, Business, Data: The Three Axes of Application Orientation

    Chapter 6: Murder on the Orient Express

    Given the generally goody demeanor of tenured comp sci professors, I would consider such chapter names not only realistic, but highly probable.



  • If this candidate were also egotistical, attempting to teach OOP-gurus how to - for example - substring, throwing around words like "overload" when he's never overloaded anything in his life - I'd swear it was my "Gary".



  • @hoodaticus said:

    he's never overloaded anything in his life
    No way! I don't believe a guy like that has never overloaded a poor, innocent coworker's patience.



  • @PJH said:

    @dhromed said:

    @wf_tmro said:

    "Programming with oriented objects"..
     

    Chapter 1: Leftward Orientation

    Chapter 2: Rotational Righthand Orientation

    Chapter 3: Homosexual Orientation

    Chapter 4: Cartesian code considerations in a dimensional IDE

    Chapter 5: Presentation, Business, Data: The Three Axes of Application Orientation

    Chapter 6: Murder on the Orient Express
     

    Chapter 7: Supporting Leyton Orient or How I Stopped Worrying And Learned To Love Defeat

     


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