AVG js


  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    So, I use the free version of AVG (a decision I am now reconsidering after reading this code, and also a few infections that have sneaked by its vigilant watch). I happened to notice that it is injecting a Javascript file reference into webpages loaded with Firefox. The following code was the first thing to spring out at me from that file, but I'm sure it's chock full of WTF:



    function Stuck (a_size) {
    this.size=a_size;
    //define the stuck size
    this.StuckArray=new Array(this.size);
    this.currentIndex = 0;

     //add an item to the begining of the stuck. If stuck is full, pop out the oldest item
    
     this.add = function(item){
      if (this.StuckArray.length>this.size)
      {
       this.StuckArray.pop();
      }
      this.StuckArray.unshift(String(item));
     };
     
     //finds if item exists
     this.find = function(item){
      var s_item=String(item);
      for (var i=0;i<this.size;i++)
      {
       if(s_item==this.StuckArray[i])
       {
       return true;
       }
      }
      return false;
     };
     
     //toString implemetation
     this.toString=function(){return this.StuckArray.toString()};
     
    
    }
    

    First off, there are a lot misspellings ("begining", "implemetation", etc). In the comments, maybe I could overlook that, but an actual object named Stuck (when clearly Stack is meant)?

    Edit: OK, this class isn't a stack at all. You add to it, and you search it? The only public interface is to add an item or test for its existence. Somehow, this is even more WTFy to me. Also: (nitpicky) the underlying "StuckArray" is exposed publicly.

    Secondly, why does this class even need to exist? It's just a thin wrapper around an array object, which, in Javascript, has its own intrinsic stack-like methods and queue-like methods (and indexOf, for find); not to mention that prototyping allows you to extend even the built-in types in JS.

    Thirdly, and most importantly, why is it injecting code into my webpages in the first place? There has to be a better way.

    ...

    On a barely related topic, which free antivirus solution should I replace this pile with?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

     Pitch AVG into the dumpster from whence it came, grab Microsoft Security Essentials. It's Good Enough(TM) and considerably better behaved than most consumer-level commercial offerings (and several enterprise offerings)



  • I see two WTFs: That this is injected directly into the page (rather than using something like Firefox's own extension support), and having a size restriction at all, let alone having stuff fall off the other end of the array when you hit that restriction.

    But the rest of it, I'm not sure. Without that size restriction, this is just a really inefficient implementation of a set, which is a useful abstract data type. Doing it like this means that it could be replaced by something else, like a hash, without changing any code that depends on it, assuming said code doesn't directly access the underlying StuckArray.

    That the "StuckArray" is exposed publicly isn't that much of an issue for me, either. JavaScript doesn't have anything like "protected" -- it's either public or it's hidden entirely, either by closure tricks or native code. But if it's really hidden in that way, it seems like you wouldn't be able to do any sort of inheritance.

    I suppose you're right -- it might be better to simply extend or modify an array. On the other hand, you wouldn't be able to use the 'new Stuck()' syntax anymore. That's not entirely bad -- forcing people to call a constructor without the 'new' is a lot more flexible in the long run.



  •  FWIW, "der Stück" means "the piece".



  • You can reinstall AVG without the shitty "web filter", and you should get rid of that JS injection, I think.

    I doubt it's a reference to der Stück, AVG is a Slovak program.

    Said that, MS Security Essentials is the only semi-good free AV left, with the possible exception of Avast (I haven't used it since v4.7, which was quite bad, but friends tell me the current (v6?) is good.).
    AVG is very slow, and likes to cause conflicts with software; Avira, which WAS very good, sold itself to the dark side a few weeks ago, removing some known crap from the "Pontentially Unwanted" detection list, INSTALLING one of those itself, and advertising the other one (just google for "avira ask toolbar").
    Well, there are also Forticlient and Bitdefender - but I've never seen them do much good. Feel free to correct me if you think otherwise, I'd like to know.

    Myself, after Avira screwed so much with its users' trust, moved all my PCs to ESET. Good, fast, not cheap but affordable (especially in this 3-for-price-of-1.5 promo). Sure, most commercial AVs suck (Symantec, McAfee, Trend *shuddders* Micro)... but this one, as far as I can say, doesn't.

    PS. It's kinda odd... Avast is Czech, AVG and ESET are Slovak, and I seem to remember some other big name is from the former Yugoslavia...?



  • @Sanity said:

    I see two WTFs: That this is injected directly into the page (rather than using something like Firefox's own extension support)
    I'm not on Windows right now so I can't check, but I know for sure that there is an AVG addon (which I've disabled). But maybe that's just the mechanism they use to inject the JS in the first place.



  • @da Doctah said:

     FWIW, "der Stück" means "the piece".

    Das Stück. Anyway, how is this relevant? The class doesn't resemble a piece at all.



  • @da Doctah said:

     FWIW, "der Stück" means "the piece".

     

     

    It's "das Stück".

    It's always funny hearing Nightcrawler saying "Katzchen" instead of "Kätzchen" or hearing Nazis scream "Amerikaners" in Call of Duty.

     



  • @bannedfromcoding said:

    PS. It's kinda odd... Avast is Czech, AVG and ESET are Slovak, and I seem to remember some other big name is from the former Yugoslavia...?

    Avira is a German company (Avira GmbH).



  • @da Doctah said:

     FWIW, "der Stück" means "the piece".

    What???

    • First off it's "das Stück", i.e. it's neuter
    • If you can't write an u umlaut you replace it with "ue" instead of simply dropping it.
    • I don't see how "the piece" would make any more sense, anyways.

     

    EDIT: Ninja'd



  • @fire2k said:

    It's always funny hearing Nightcrawler saying "Katzchen" instead of "Kätzchen" or hearing Nazis scream "Amerikaners" in Call of Duty.

    Simpsons had a really great joke though. In one episode they had the mayor say "Ich bin ein Springfielder", and Homer responded "Mmmm, jelly donuts!"

    (I thought they must have had a German in their team to write that joke; on the other hand, the episode it called "Burns verkaufen der Kraftwerk" so yeah, probably not)



  • @derula said:

    Simpsons had a really great joke though. In one episode they had the mayor say "Ich bin ein Springfielder", and Homer responded "Mmmm, jelly donuts!"

    (I thought they must have had a German in their team to write that joke; on the other hand, the episode it called "Burns verkaufen der Kraftwerk" so yeah, probably not)

    Kennedy's gaffe is pretty well known in America, even among those who don't speak German (like me). And since the mayor is a Kennedy...



  • @derula said:

    @bannedfromcoding said:
    PS. It's kinda odd... Avast is Czech, AVG and ESET are Slovak, and I seem to remember some other big name is from the former Yugoslavia...?

    Avira is a German company (Avira GmbH).

    Is it surprising that anti-virus companies come from the countries viruses come from?



  • @boomzilla said:

    Kennedy's gaffe is pretty well known in America, even among those who don't speak German (like me). And since the mayor is a Kennedy...

    Hm... okay then. I thought it was well known, but didn't know it was known as a gaffe. I mean there was nothing wrong with the sentence other than it could also mean something different.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @derula said:
    @bannedfromcoding said:
    PS. It's kinda odd... Avast is Czech, AVG and ESET are Slovak, and I seem to remember some other big name is from the former Yugoslavia...?

    Avira is a German company (Avira GmbH).

    Is it surprising that anti-virus companies come from the countries viruses come from?

    Anti-terror troops don't come from the same countries terrorists come from.



  • AVG is also Czech. Apparently technically Czechoslovak, but the Czech side of that.



  • @derula said:

    @boomzilla said:
    Kennedy's gaffe is pretty well known in America, even among those who don't speak German (like me). And since the mayor is a Kennedy...
    Hm... okay then. I thought it was well known, but didn't know it was known as a gaffe. I mean there was nothing wrong with the sentence other than it could also mean something different.

    I think the reason it's commonly known over here is because it's a gaffe- Despite not really being one. I'm willing to bet more people under 50 or so know the Jelly Doughnut part than know what the speech was actually about.



  • @derula said:

    @bannedfromcoding said:
    PS. It's kinda odd... Avast is Czech, AVG and ESET are Slovak, and I seem to remember some other big name is from the former Yugoslavia...?

    Avira is a German company (Avira GmbH).

    Were you adding to my list, or correcting me? Avira AntiVir is by Avira GmbH indeed (formerly some-crazy-long-name-foundation). AVG (Anti-Virus Guard) is by AVG Technologies, formerly Grisoft, from Slovakia.

    My point was that it was slightly odd that there are at least three antiviruses originating in the former Czechoslovakia.



    ED: And there's AVK (AntiVirenKit) by G-Data from Germany, to confuse the names further...



  •  I've used ESET (NOD32) for over 10 years on multiple PCs with exactly zero malware problems. I also know 2 people in charge of network security (one at a university, one at a large corporation) who use it on their personal PCs (I guess "personal PCs" is like "ATM machine", but.. meh). I don't find it that expensive, but I guess that's relative. It's worth every penny IMO.

     I've also heard similar testimony from fans of Kapersky, but have not tried it myself. It will be what I try should the day come when ESET's offering begins to suck.



  • @bannedfromcoding said:

    the only semi-good free AV left, with the possible exception of Avast (I haven't used it since v4.7, which was quite bad, but friends tell me the current (v6?) is good.)

    Yep, I'd agree with Avast. I use it here and have had zero malwarez since I started using it several years ago. Avast and Comodo (firewall only, not their AV) seem to do the trick for me here.



  • @bannedfromcoding said:

    Well, there are also Forticlient and Bitdefender - but I've never seen them do much good. Feel free to correct me if you think otherwise, I'd like to know.

     

    I've never used Bitdefender as live protection, but I've found their rescue cd to be the best tool for wresting back control of an infected machine.

     



  • @cdosrun said:

    @derula said:

    @boomzilla said:
    Kennedy's gaffe is pretty well known in America, even among those who don't speak German (like me). And since the mayor is a Kennedy...
    Hm... okay then. I thought it was well known, but didn't know it was known as a gaffe. I mean there was nothing wrong with the sentence other than it could also mean something different.

    I think the reason it's commonly known over here is because it's a gaffe- Despite not really being one. I'm willing to bet more people under 50 or so know the Jelly Doughnut part than know what the speech was actually about.

    Is it a gaffe? Snopes doesn't seem to think so.


  • @PJH said:

    Is it a gaffe? Snopes doesn't seem to think so.
    Nor does Wikipedia.



  • @Zecc said:

    @PJH said:
    Is it a gaffe? Snopes doesn't seem to think so.

    Nor does Wikipedia.

    In politics, a gaffe is what it's perceived to be. Also, Mark Twain was right about the German language.



  • @boomzilla said:

    Also, Mark Twain was right about the German language.
    [quote user="Mark Twain"]Never knew before what eternity was made for. It is to give some of us a chance to learn German.[/quote]



  •  @blakeyrat said:

    Is it surprising that anti-virus companies come from the countries viruses come from?

     Obvious troll is too obvious



  • @bannedfromcoding said:

    @derula said:
    @bannedfromcoding said:
    PS. It's kinda odd... Avast is Czech, AVG and ESET are Slovak, and I seem to remember some other big name is from the former Yugoslavia...?

    Avira is a German company (Avira GmbH).

    Were you adding to my list, or correcting me? Avira AntiVir is by Avira GmbH indeed (formerly some-crazy-long-name-foundation). AVG (Anti-Virus Guard) is by AVG Technologies, formerly Grisoft, from Slovakia.

    My point was that it was slightly odd that there are at least three antiviruses originating in the former Czechoslovakia.



    ED: And there's AVK (AntiVirenKit) by G-Data from Germany, to confuse the names further...


    I know it's kinda irrelevant to your point, but again, AVG is Czech not Slovak.



  • @Mel said:

    @bannedfromcoding said:
    @derula said:
    @bannedfromcoding said:
    PS. It's kinda odd... Avast is Czech, AVG and ESET are Slovak, and I seem to remember some other big name is from the former Yugoslavia...?
    Avira is a German company (Avira GmbH).
    Were you adding to my list, or correcting me? Avira AntiVir is by Avira GmbH indeed (formerly some-crazy-long-name-foundation). AVG (Anti-Virus Guard) is by AVG Technologies, formerly Grisoft, from Slovakia.
    My point was that it was slightly odd that there are at least three antiviruses originating in the former Czechoslovakia.

    ED: And there's AVK (AntiVirenKit) by G-Data from Germany, to confuse the names further...
    I know it's kinda irrelevant to your point, but again, AVG is Czech not Slovak.

    Oh. Sorry, I was convinced earlier they were Slovak. Just checked, and seems you're right. Sorry.



  • @Weng said:

     Pitch AVG into the dumpster from whence it came, grab Microsoft Security Essentials. It's Good Enough(TM) and considerably better behaved than most consumer-level commercial offerings (and several enterprise offerings)

    I've actually stopped installing my enterprise AV and instead been using MSE.  It is "Good Enough".  Especially with all the bullshit that slips through Norton's fingers.

     



  • @hoodaticus said:

    I've actually stopped installing my enterprise AV and instead been using MSE.  It is "Good Enough".  Especially with all the bullshit that slips through Norton's fingers.

    You know it has a non-commercial use only license, right?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @hoodaticus said:
    I've actually stopped installing my enterprise AV and instead been using MSE.  It is "Good Enough".  Especially with all the bullshit that slips through Norton's fingers.

    You know it has a non-commercial use only license, right?

    I heard (second hand; i.e. someone has been there and told me) they had Avira's free version installed on all the computers of a fricken software development company who writes software for law firms. Apparently, they knew it wasn't exactly legal, but just didn't care much.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @hoodaticus said:
    I've actually stopped installing my enterprise AV and instead been using MSE.  It is "Good Enough".  Especially with all the bullshit that slips through Norton's fingers.

    You know it has a non-commercial use only license, right?

    Maybe it's the version he gets to install on his personal system. Right?



  • @boomzilla said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    @hoodaticus said:
    I've actually stopped installing my enterprise AV and instead been using MSE.  It is "Good Enough".  Especially with all the bullshit that slips through Norton's fingers.

    You know it has a non-commercial use only license, right?

    Maybe it's the version he gets to install on his personal system. Right?

    I'm not a Nazi about it or anything. Some people are genuinely unaware of the license, they figure that since it comes from Microsoft it's free and clear to use on all Windows systems.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    I'm not a Nazi about it or anything. Some people are genuinely unaware of the license, they figure that since it comes from Microsoft it's free and clear to use on all Windows systems.

    Indeed. Nevertheless, licenses are important. Still, I have our "enterprise" AV stuff on my home system, which is perfectly valid under the license. It didn't seem that was what hoodaticus was doing, though.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blakeyrat said:

    Some people are genuinely unaware of the license, they figure that since it comes from Microsoft it's free and clear to use on all Windows systems.
    You know, I'd noticed it didn't work on Windows Server and never once bothered to check the license. Microsoft needs to cough up an enterprise version.

    Of course, that would set the regular AV companies about the typical "OMFG MICROSOFT IS ENCROACHING INTO MY MARKETSHARE! MONOPOLY! ANTITRUST! OMFG!" crap that comes every time Microsoft introduces a new product.



  • @Weng said:

    You know, I'd noticed it didn't work on Windows Server and never once bothered to check the license. Microsoft needs to cough up an enterprise version.

    Forefront. And yes, "endpoint" in this context is each single desktop or server.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @bannedfromcoding said:

    @Weng said:
    You know, I'd noticed it didn't work on Windows Server and never once bothered to check the license. Microsoft needs to cough up an enterprise version.

    Forefront. And yes, "endpoint" in this context is each single desktop or server.
    ... Seriously? $10/yr/endpoint? That's CHEAP AS HELL. Why have I never heard of it? Why am I constantly saddled with irritating-assed SEP?



  • @Weng said:

    @bannedfromcoding said:

    @Weng said:
    You know, I'd noticed it didn't work on Windows Server and never once bothered to check the license. Microsoft needs to cough up an enterprise version.
    Forefront. And yes, "endpoint" in this context is each single desktop or server.
    ... Seriously? $10/yr/endpoint? That's CHEAP AS HELL. Why have I never heard of it? Why am I constantly saddled with irritating-assed SEP?


    Only reasons Symantec's still alive is because the corporate management everywhere remembers that "it waz teh thing" in early 90s, so orders purchasing it, and because they pay OEMs to preinstall the 30-day version on new retail PCs.

    I wish we'd switch to Forefront from Trend. The latter is worse than ridiculous.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    You know it has a non-commercial use only license, right?
    The license actually allows you to use MSSE in small business environments (up to 10 devices).



  • @PJH said:

    @cdosrun said:

    @derula said:

    @boomzilla said:
    Kennedy's gaffe is pretty well known in America, even among those who don't speak German (like me). And since the mayor is a Kennedy...
    Hm... okay then. I thought it was well known, but didn't know it was known as a gaffe. I mean there was nothing wrong with the sentence other than it could also mean something different.

    I think the reason it's commonly known over here is because it's a gaffe- Despite not really being one. I'm willing to bet more people under 50 or so know the Jelly Doughnut part than know what the speech was actually about.

    Is it a gaffe? Snopes doesn't seem to think so.

     My apologies. I should have been more clear. When I said  "It's popularly known because it's a gaffe, [b]despite not really being one[/b]", I was attempting to convey the concept that it's a popular misconception that this was a gaffe. In fact, the misconception is so popular that I am willing to beleive more people, of that age group, know of the misconception than know of the actual content of the speech.

     I'm trying to convey the concept that sentance was not a gaffe, but that many people beleive it to be. Further, that more people who weren't alive or old enough to comprehend the speech at the time it was made, beleive the gaffe urban legend than know and understand the content and context of the speech during which it was said.

     The major points of the concept I was attempting to convery are

    1. Many Americans know of the "Ich bin ein berliner" line.

    2. Most of the Americans who know of it, know it as the Jelly Doughnut line.

    3. A smaller number of Americans who know of it, know it as part of a larger speech regarding the joint occupation of Berlin, and the reaction to the Berlin wall.

    4. Points 2 and 3 are particularly true of American's who learned this as history instead of current events.

    5. The phrase does not actually mean "I am a Jelly Doughnut."

     I hope my explanation has cleared up any question you may have had about whether I considered this to be a gaffe or not.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @cdosrun said:

    3. A smaller number of Americans who know of it, know it as part of a larger speech regarding the joint occupation of Berlin, and the reaction to the Berlin wall.

    4. Points 2 and 3 are particularly true of American's who learned this as history instead of current events.

    True facts. When I first heard it explained, it was set up as if he said it to a group of people who were waiting at the bottom of the airstairs when he got off the plane, which makes it even more nonsensical.


  • @cdosrun said:

    My apologies. I should have been more clear. When I said  "It's popularly known because it's a gaffe, despite not really being one", I was attempting to convey the concept that it's a popular misconception that this was a gaffe. In fact, the misconception is so popular that I am willing to beleive more people, of that age group, know of the misconception than know of the actual content of the speech.

    FYI, the phrase "popularly believed" implies that it's not true, even though lots of people think it is. The phrase, "popularly known" implies that it is true. ENGLISH HAS ANTICIPATED YOUR NEED!



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @cdosrun said:
    My apologies. I should have been more clear. When I said  "It's popularly known because it's a gaffe, despite not really being one", I was attempting to convey the concept that it's a popular misconception that this was a gaffe. In fact, the misconception is so popular that I am willing to beleive more people, of that age group, know of the misconception than know of the actual content of the speech.
    FYI, the phrase "popularly believed" implies that it's not true, even though lots of people think it is. The phrase, "popularly known" implies that it is true. ENGLISH HAS ANTICIPATED YOUR NEED!

     

    You are technically right, sir, which is the best kind of right. I would offer that "It", in this case, is the Ich bin ein berliner phrase. It's a well known phrase. It's well known because it's believed to be a gaffe. It's well known because it's believed to be a gaffe, despite not really being one.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>

    However, that simply redefines my mistake as improperly defining my pronouns.

    Obviously, despite not really being one was insufficient to clarify any possible ambiguity.<o:p></o:p>

     



  • @cdosrun said:

    1. Many Americans know of the "Ich bin ein berliner" line.

    2. Most of the Americans who know of it, know it as the Jelly Doughnut line.

    I have always found this very odd and never understood how it became such a "well known gaffe".    "Ich bin Berliner" means I am literally a person from Berlin.  "Ich bin ein Berliner" means "I am like a person from Berlin" which is what Kennedy wanted to say and he said it correctly..  Yes, technically a "Berliner" is also something else, but, if you were in New York City and said "I am a New Yorker" would people laugh at you and claim that you just called yourself a magazine?  I guess people like to believe stupid stuff.

     



  • @El_Heffe said:

    @cdosrun said:

    1. Many Americans know of the "Ich bin ein berliner" line.

    2. Most of the Americans who know of it, know it as the Jelly Doughnut line.

    I have always found this very odd and never understood how it became such a "well known gaffe".    "Ich bin Berliner" means I am literally a person from Berlin.  "Ich bin ein Berliner" means "I am like a person from Berlin" which is what Kennedy wanted to say and he said it correctly..  Yes, technically a "Berliner" is also something else, but, if you were in New York City and said "I am a New Yorker" would people laugh at you and claim that you just called yourself a magazine?  I guess people like to believe stupid stuff.

     

    People still repeat the "Chevy Nova" means "doesn't go" in Spanish one. Or the "Coca-Cola in China was bite the wax tadpoles" one all the time. I don't know why you're surprised.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    People still repeat the "Chevy Nova" means "doesn't go" in Spanish one. Or the "Coca-Cola in China was bite the wax tadpoles" one all the time. I don't know why you're surprised.
     

    For the record, "no va" in Spanish does mean "doesn't go", but it's more in the nature of noticing that the AMC Gremlin was named after a creature known for causing mechanical problems; i.e., it has to be pointed out and then they go "ah, now I get it, that's funny".

    Coca-Cola did use characters that meant "bite the wax tadpole" for a very brief time before they were replaced with something almost as phonetic that had a more auspicious reading.

    Brazilian woman I used to work with cracked up when I described something I cooked with "adobo" seasoning.  Apparently "adobo" or something very close to it means (as she put it) "poop" in Portuguese.  (Her reaction to the observation that the English word "payday" sounds like Portuguese for "I farted" was like the "no va" situation.)



  • @da Doctah said:

    Apparently "adobo" or something very close to it means (as she put it) "poop" in Portuguese.
    I don't know if "adobo" is some sort of Brazillian Portuguese slang, but the Portuguese word "adubo" (pronounced "uh-DOO-boo") means "fertilizer". Possibly "manure", I guess.



  • @da Doctah said:

    For the record, "no va" in Spanish does mean "doesn't go",

    Yeah, in the same way an English dining set named "notable" means there's "no table". OH WAIT IT DOESN'T MEAN THAT AT ALL. Punctuation matters, in both English and Spanish. (Note: example taken from Snopes.com which, despite its nasty advertising, you should consult before repeating anything that sounds like an urban legend.)

    @da Doctah said:

    Coca-Cola did use characters that meant "bite the wax tadpole" for a very brief time before they were replaced with something almost as phonetic that had a more auspicious reading.

    Independent shopkeepers used those characters, the Coca-Cola Corporation never did. Again, consult Snopes. Coca-Cola's official name in China never translated to "bite the wax tadpole."



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @da Doctah said:
    For the record, "no va" in Spanish does mean "doesn't go",

    Yeah, in the same way an English dining set named "notable" means there's "no table". OH WAIT IT DOESN'T MEAN THAT AT ALL. Punctuation matters, in both English and Spanish. (Note: example taken from Snopes.com which, despite its nasty advertising, you should consult before repeating anything that sounds like an urban legend.)

    Did you read what he said? Do you really think you're contradicting him?



  • @boomzilla said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    @da Doctah said:
    For the record, "no va" in Spanish does mean "doesn't go",

    Yeah, in the same way an English dining set named "notable" means there's "no table". OH WAIT IT DOESN'T MEAN THAT AT ALL. Punctuation matters, in both English and Spanish. (Note: example taken from Snopes.com which, despite its nasty advertising, you should consult before repeating anything that sounds like an urban legend.)

    Did you read what he said? Do you really think you're contradicting him?

    Yes, but "no va" wasn't the name of the car. So while his explanation was technically correct, it was also TOTALLY USELESS. So why would he have posted it? The only possible reason is that he was trying to support the urban legend by going into more information on how it was formed. Or maybe he posted it because he's a total idiot who likes to post totally useless things to messageboards, but I prefer to give the benefit of the doubt.

    I do think about these things, you know.


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