VC demands Oracle?



  • Has anyone else walked into a spot where you're the lead and before you
    got there, the money people (by definition, non-technical types) have
    already decided (and it's now in stone somehow) that Oracle will be the
    database.



    And when you presume to ask about the expensive DBA they surely have already hired to babysit the system you get a blank stare?



    When you ask what business the VC guy had in telling the company which
    database was going to be used, you get the standard, "Well everyone
    uses Oracle, it's the best..(trails off)".



    Think I ought to reconsider jobs like that, or maybe just start
    charging more for the hassle of also being an Oracle DBA (the whole
    putting on 300 lb's like our RedNeck friend just isn't appealing)



  • @memorex said:

    Think I ought to reconsider jobs like that, or maybe just start charging more for the hassle of also being an Oracle DBA (the whole putting on 300 lb's like our RedNeck friend just isn't appealing)

    You may be on to something here. Ever since I took over the Oracle DBA position at my work, I've started gaining weight. How.. weird.

    Stay Slim. Stay Sexy. Stay SQL Server.



  • @Frijoles said:

    Stay Slim. Stay Sexy. Stay SQL Server.

    I like that!



  • @Alex Papadimoulis said:

     Frijoles wrote:
    Stay Slim. Stay Sexy. Stay SQL Server.

    I like that!



  • You mean, Postgres, right? [:P]



  • Postgres or postgre? I always wondered about the difference between them two. I thought it was postgre but on Google I can also find references to postgres...



  • postgre is the French version.



  • Postgre was the original version, but it now is called PostgreSQL, which everyone shortens to Postgres....





    @Katja said:

    Postgres or postgre? I always wondered about the
    difference between them two. I thought it was postgre but on Google I
    can also find references to postgres...



  • Actually, the original name was "Postgres". They (misguidedly, IMHO) changed it to "PostgreSQL" (pronounced "Postgres-Q-L") shortly after adding SQL support about a decade ago. A lot of people erroniously shorten it to "Postgre". I (and many others) just call it Postgres, which is at least historically accurate. "PostgreSQL" is just too much of a mouthful, and it's even more crazy when people pronounce "SQL" as "Sequel".



  • @Neal said:

    ...it's even more crazy when people pronounce "SQL" as "Sequel".

    If I had a dollar for every time I almost punched someone in the face for saying that... ;)



  • <FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff">Nearly everyone where I work says "sequel" instead of "SQL."  At first I resisted, but now I find myself slipping more and more...help!  [:'(]</FONT>



  • I am on the SQL Server team at Microsoft, and we here pronounce it "Sequel".



  • @memorex said:

    Has anyone else walked into a spot where you're the lead and before you
    got there, the money people (by definition, non-technical types) have
    already decided (and it's now in stone somehow) that Oracle will be the
    database.




    This was the case in a company where I work, shortly after I joined
    them. Fortunately for me, I use MSSQL and DB2/400 so I rarely have to
    touch the Oracle crap.



  • "Sequel" is historically accurate too, because that was the name of
    SQL's predecessor, standing for Simple English QUEry Language.
    Presumably it was English in the sense that it used some English words,
    and Simple in the sense that, um, marketing thought that would sound
    good.



  • @Neal said:

    Actually, the original name was "Postgres". They (misguidedly, IMHO) changed it to "PostgreSQL" (pronounced "Postgres-Q-L") shortly after adding SQL support about a decade ago. A lot of people erroniously shorten it to "Postgre". I (and many others) just call it Postgres, which is at least historically accurate. "PostgreSQL" is just too much of a mouthful, and it's even more crazy when people pronounce "SQL" as "Sequel".

    I like PosgreSQL (and I pronounce it incorrectly as Postgres-SQUEAL).

    Sounds like a fun database, for a pig farmer.

    Not that I'm a pig farmer.  But if I were, I'd sure use PostgreSQL.

    ;-)  <<==  I make my smilies the old fashioned way.

     



  • Some people call it "Squirrel". Of course, some people believe that magnets cure cancer.



  • Postgres-SQUEAL - oh funny laughing my pants off



  • It’s “Postgres,” in reference to “Ingres.” It later became “PostgreSQL,” which is pronounced “Postgres-cue-ell.”

    I sometimes pronounce SQL by itself “squeal,” but usually just spell it, and I never ever say “sequel.” The first time someone told me about making changes on the “sequel server,” I thought they were referring to a concept like “development server,” “staging server,” etc. People who use that pronounciation have waived their rights to participate in the gene pool.



  • This is funny. I was reading just to figure out why people
    hated oracle so much but I like this SQL v. Sequel controversy :). Almost
    everyone in our non-development departments uses sequel but my favorite is when
    people actually spell it that way for real in an email or other correspondence. I
    have actually seen the sequel written in official technical documents. This is
    an excerpt from a statement of work that a fairly experienced consulting company
    generated. It was sent to me for review by the customer that we and this consultant have in common.<o:p></o:p>

    Current System Information<o:p></o:p>

    System Vendor and Version:<o:p></o:p>

    ############<o:p></o:p>

    <o:p> </o:p>

    <o:p> </o:p>

    Database Vendor and Version:<o:p></o:p>

    Sequel Server 2000<o:p></o:p>

    <o:p> </o:p>

    <o:p> </o:p>

    Media Format (Optical / Tape / Magnetic):<o:p></o:p>

    Non-ablative 5 ¼” Optical Platters<o:p>
     </o:p>

    <o:p> </o:p>

    <o:p> </o:p>

    Media Vendor and Size:<o:p></o:p>

    HP 2.6 and 5.2 GB<o:p></o:p>



  • @Ben Hutchings said:

    "Sequel" is historically accurate too, because that was the name of SQL's predecessor, standing for Simple English QUEry Language. Presumably it was English in the sense that it used some English words, and Simple in the sense that, um, marketing thought that would sound good.

     

    OMG! that is too funny... and sad at the same time...[^o)]



  • @ssanders82 said:

    I don't mean to resurrect this argument, but
    it really surprised me. I've worked with 3 different web dev companies
    in the past 3 years, (usually) with people who know what they're doing,
    and all I've ever heard is "sequel server". In school, too, my
    professors said "sequel server". I've never heard anyone say "S-Q-L
    Server" for Microsoft's database.
    I've heard "sequel" for just plain old SQL (i.e., "can you take a look
    at my sequel statment") but I don't care for it. I've never heard
    "MySequel" or "PostgreSequel", either.
    I also say gif, jay-peg, and gooey instead of saying "G-I-F", "J-P-G",
    and "G-U-I". I'm also from the South, so feel free to immediately
    denounce me as an idiot.




    I have heard MySequel, but never PostgreSequel ( Post greh seek well ?  hard to pronounce).



    And GIF is pronounced like Jif, the peanut butter, not like the g in golf.



    <AOL>

    I'm from the South

    </AOL>



  • You're supposed to spell out acronyms that don't have any vowels, like SQL, instead of making vowels up.  However, acronyms that do have vowels, like jpeg, gif, and gui, can be pronounced without having to make anything up to accomidate for the lack of vowels in words like SQL.



  • @dave said:



    Question the first. When are we going to get on to arguing whether 'tuple' is pronounced with a long or short 'u'?


    long 'u', as in 'puke'.



    If you want a short 'u', spell it 'tupple'



    ;-)




  • @dave said:

    Point the first. An acronym is a pronouncable abbreviation. If you insist on pronouncing SQL as Es Cue El then it is an abbreviation, not an acronym.

    Point the second. Sequel is quicker to say (2 syllables, no gaps between syllables) and sounds more aesthetic.

    Point the third. 'jif' is the name of a bathroom cleaner. It's 'gif' with a hard g.

    Point the fourth. There are no formal rules about abbreviation pronunciation - these are dictated by trend.


    2. It also sounds more pretentious and suggest a sequence of some kind, which there isn't, which makes it a misleading pronunciation. S-Q-L, please. The speed advantage of 'Sequel' over 'SQL' is as large as pre- vs post-increment, ie. imperceptible and unusable.

    3. I will pronounce gif as in gyrate and gender, not as in great and good. Do not try to make me pronounce PNG as 'ping' because Lord help me I will shoot you dead.

    4. True. However: screw the trend.



  • SQL should be pronounced Ess-Kyoo-Ell, GIF should be Gee-Eye-Eff.  Words with enough vowels, like LAN and GUI, should be pronounced as actual words (Laahn and Gooey).  PNG doesn't have any vowels in it, so it should be pronounced Pee-Enn-Gee

    Somebody really should come up with a standard for all of this.  Then we can all argue with them instead of with eachother.

    As a general rule, words with little or no vowels ("SQL") should be pronounced as individual letters ("Ess-Kyoo-Ell").  Adding more letters in to make it sound like a word is a stupid idea.  If you pronounce it Sequel, you are adding 3 more letters - the new word is 50% made up!  This should apply to everything else.  I don't like the word "Computer", so I'm going to add 8 more letters and create my own word!  I'll call it... Calometaputerize.  And everyone should recognise it as "Computer".

    On the other hand, words with enough vowels, like GUI (66% vowels) should be actually pronounced (Gooey).

    And "Jif" is a brand of peanut butter, and it sounds stupid enough as that.  Applying it to computers makes it sound stupider.  ("Pass the Jif!" "Here" "No, the file, not the peanut butter!")

    This is the THIRD time I have typed this all out - the frelling forum software reloads the previous page juuust before I click "post".



  • @Albatross said:

    And "Jif" is a brand of peanut butter, and it sounds stupid enough as that.  Applying it to computers makes it sound stupider.  ("Pass the Jif!" "Here" "No, the file, not the peanut butter!")

    This is the THIRD time I have typed this all out - the frelling forum software reloads the previous page juuust before I click "post".



    I'm not going to pronounce it G.I.F. just because you silly people have a silly peanutbutter brand.

    How does reloading a page that you're not actually on influence your posting?


  • @Albatross said:

    SQL should be pronounced Ess-Kyoo-Ell, GIF
    should be Gee-Eye-Eff.  Words with enough vowels, like LAN and
    GUI, should be pronounced as actual words (Laahn and Gooey).  PNG
    doesn't have any vowels in it, so it should be pronounced Pee-Enn-Gee

    Somebody really should come up with a standard for all of this.  Then we can all argue with them instead of with eachother.

    As a general rule, words with little or no vowels ("SQL") should be pronounced as individual letters ("Ess-Kyoo-Ell").  Adding more letters in to make it sound like a word is a stupid idea.  If you pronounce it Sequel, you are adding 3 more letters - the new word is 50% made up!  This should apply to everything else.  I don't like the word "Computer", so I'm going to add 8 more letters and create my own word!  I'll call it... Calometaputerize.  And everyone should recognise it as "Computer".

    On the other hand, words with enough vowels, like GUI (66% vowels) should be actually pronounced (Gooey).

    And "Jif" is a brand of peanut butter, and it sounds stupid enough as that.  Applying it to computers makes it sound stupider.  ("Pass the Jif!" "Here" "No, the file, not the peanut butter!")

    This is the THIRD time I have typed this all out - the frelling forum software reloads the previous page juuust before I click "post".



    Why does LAN have enough vowels, yet GIF does not?

    If I pronounce SQL as 'sequel' that is 2 syllables, as opposed to saying es-kew-ell which is 3 syllables. Who gives a rat's arse about adding 3 more letters to make it sequel? We aren't *writing* it as sequel, we still write SQL, only pronounce it sequel.

    Also, I could spell my name S-M-I-T-H but pronounce it 'Jablonsky' if I wanted to.

    Your theories are a definite WTF, in the pure spirit of this forum.



  • @Albatross said:

    Somebody really should come up with a standard for all of this.  Then we can all argue with them instead of with eachother.

    Seriously?  You want a standard for how to pronounce acronyms?  Here's a standard for you - can someone understand what the hell I'm talking about?  If so, rock on!  Really, what's the point of getting your panties in a bunch over whether someone says sequel or S-Q-L?  Who the hell cares?!  You know what they mean.

    I'll continue to say sequel knowing that I'm driving pedantic pecker-heads ever closer to insanity every time I say it.



  • Don't like jif?  How about pronouncing it the way it looks - gif.  Like gift without the t.  Here's another rule, when in doubt pronounce the letter like it's pronounced in the word it represents.  G stands for graphical not jraphical.  Really though, I couldn't care less how people pronounce it since I know what they're talking about either way.



  • @mugs said:

    Don't like jif?  How about pronouncing it the way it looks - gif.  Like gift without the t.  Here's another rule, when in doubt pronounce the letter like it's pronounced in the word it represents.  G stands for graphical not jraphical.  Really though, I couldn't care less how people pronounce it since I know what they're talking about either way.



    In french, a "g" followed by a "i" is pronounced "j", therefore most french people say "jif". I say "gif" (as in the way we french would say "guif") nonetheless though.

    I remember reading that the official pronunciation for PNG is "ping" and for JPEG is "jee - peg". It may all in my imagination though, I don't have time right now to research whether it is true.



  • @procyon112 said:

    I am on the SQL Server team at Microsoft, and we here pronounce it "Sequel".

    You're taking up IBM mannerisms (the abomination supposedly started over at Big Blue) in Redmond?



  • @Alex Papadimoulis said:

    @Frijoles said:

    Stay Slim. Stay Sexy. Stay SQL Server.

    I like that!

     

    yes, but substitute SQL Server with DB2


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.