Oh how we laughed in those golden days, before ...



  • It's not often that an HLD document makes you laugh out loud. Today was my first time.

    A little background - the HLD is for the systems that will support a new product being launched. It of course includes a CRM system. This diagram shows the supported systems required for this CRM system, to be launched this autumn, 2011.

    [url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/captainofspray/5905810614/][img]http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6036/5905810614_cbeec70295_o.png[/img][/url]



  • Where is the problem?

    I see a high level document for a planned Web based interface to a system.  THis is obviously before decisions have been made on specifics, hence the many variations of things under each category that all do the same thing.  Why else have both IIS5 and IIS6 on the list?

    At least someone is thinking, Hey we need cluster software, what does that, list them here so we can discuss later.

    No WTF here, unless this is the final document on what to build.



  • @KattMan said:

    Where is the problem?
    Well, I was quite amused by the Netscape and IE 5 support, but that's possibly just me.



  • @KattMan said:

    Where is the problem?
    It looks like it was written about five to ten years ago and he has to support IE 6. There is the problem.



  • @delta534 said:

    @KattMan said:
    Where is the problem?
    It looks like it was written about five to ten years ago and he has to support IE 6. There is the problem.

    Maybe the company, like mine, has not moved past XP, with Vista this was understandable.  Note the OS support, they havn't installed Win7 yet.



  • At least support IE 7,chrome and every other modern browser that is compatible with XP. The sooner IE 6 dies the better.



  •  And then there's the "angry fruit salad" color scheme.



  • @da Doctah said:

    "angry fruit salad" color scheme.

     

    Thanks, that image just made my day.

     



  • @da Doctah said:

     And then there's the "angry fruit salad" color scheme.

    Not enough yellow.

     



  • The WTF is that I have have no clue what HLD stands for, and he didn't define his terms, right?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    The WTF is that I have have no clue what HLD am once again too lazy to figure out what anything stands for., and he didn't define his terms, right?

    FTFY



  • I'm guessing its high-level design.



  • @delta534 said:

    I'm guessing its high-level design.

    It could be anything!

    It bugs the shit out of me that TLAs (three-letter acronyms) are taking over the universe and people are so FUCKING RUDE that they don't even bother making their TLAs accessible to other people by, say, DEFINING THEM? Back when I was in school, I remember it being kind of important to define your abbreviations the first time you use them.

    So call it a pet peeve or whatever, but I think it's a noble quest to maintain our ability to communicate with each other without confusion.



  • They are hard to define if they are recursive /sarcasm
    I agree it could be anything and it is rude not to define acronyms even if the writer thinks that the reader would know it.



  • @KattMan said:

    Maybe the company, like mine, has not moved past XP, with Vista this was understandable.  Note the OS support, they havn't installed Win7 yet.

    I worries me to realise that I have been using Firefox now for seven years, since I installed 1.0.something in 2004. Where have all the years gone? Firefox has come up a long, long way since those days.

    It's more disturbing how many people still use a nine-year-old OS (service packs notwithstanding), especially when people are still getting brand new work PCs with XP on. Never has such a fast-paced industry seemed to stand so still. I guess after time we grow accustomed to XP and forget just how retarded it is because we're used to it and we've installed goodness knows how many workarounds and TweakedUI to death. Maybe that's why my sense of time is so skewed – the refusal of XP to die makes the last nine years feel but a dream.

    Besides, anyone who's still designing for Internet Explorer 5.5 must living in a private residential area of Hell. I wanted to tear Microsoft a few new ones just for the flaws in 7 (8 is thankfully substantially improved over 7), but to go back to 5.5/6 days … I would prepare a padded cell in advance and put my name on the door ready.



  • The WTF is that they want to use Oracle, amirite?



  • @Zemyla said:

    @da Doctah said:

     And then there's the "angry fruit salad" color scheme.

    Not enough yellow.

     

     

    Yellow will be added as a feature in release 1.1.

     



  • @blakeyrat said:

    making their TLAs accessible to other people
     

    OMG WTF LOL BBQ



  • XP was the first operating system that was "good enough."  It worked pretty well with photos and videos and web pages straight out of the box.  It was controllable for corporate environments (could be installed without Solitaire) and seems to play acceptably well with most other devices and networks that we are now accustomed to plugging in to our computers.

    Remember when it used to be important how many megahertz your processor was? It was important to get a system with the latest processor so you could play the latest games, CAD programs or whatever? Do you know the GHz speed of the computer in front of you now?  It's probably "fast enough" and you don't need to know the exact GHz.

    If you buy a new washing machine for your laundry, it probably comes with a newer faster processor and better LED readouts.  Does it wash the clothes any better than its 20-year old predecessor? No, it's "good enough" and doesn't need to be replaced when you get new clothes. So why should you replace your operating system when you get a new computer?

    XP has a lot of life left in it.  As we go to smaller handheld devices, many of them are now running operating systems that get closer and closer to XP.



  • @Qwerty said:

    XP has a lot of life left in it.
    For some applications, yes. For others, 7 is far, far better.

    XP is going to hang around for a while longer yet in fields where you don't need the latest and greatest (point of sale being a fine example, our Kmart store was using IBM 4694 POS terminals from 1991 or so up until about four years ago when they switched to newer terminals that ran the same software on a larger screen, which has only since received an update to use more than two lines of text on the screen, and Coles used NT 4 up until roughly the same time as well on their POS systems and then switched to XP\POSReady, the latter of which is essentially XP, and has support until 2014 so will be around for a while yet. Don't ask me how I know this crap). For other stuff, though, it really is time to move on, and businesses are: the city council jumped on the Vista bandwagon of all things quite early (and did that bite the library in the ass, the application they used didn't work with Vista and I still don't think does but that's another rant for another day), and are also starting to shift to Windows 7, for example.

    I find whenever I have to use XP for actual work, it annoys me more than anything because some of the stuff in 7, like instant search, the superbar. the breadcrumb bar in explorer, Internet Explorer 9 amongst others* aren't there.

    * When I have to misfortune to be on a locked down computer and have no option to use anything other than Internet Explorer, I'd take 9 any day. At least it doesn't randomly lock up while rendering a webpage.



  • @Douglasac said:

    POS systems
     

    I'm just semantically happy that POS systems are, in fact, often POS systems.



  • @dhromed said:

    @Douglasac said:

    POS systems
     

    I'm just semantically happy that POS systems are, in fact, often POS systems.

    This is one of the times that a BlakeyRant hits home. It pays to have explained POS stands for Point-Of-Sale, and not the more obvious option...



  • @steenbergh said:

    @dhromed said:

    @Douglasac said:

    POS systems
     

    I'm just semantically happy that POS systems are, in fact, often POS systems.

    This is one of the times that a BlakeyRant hits home. It pays to have explained POS stands for Point-Of-Sale, and not the more obvious option...

    I read dhromed's sentence as containing one of each.


  • @Qwerty said:

    XP was the first operating system that was "good enough."

    Yes. All OSes used before XP were not good enough. Even though they ran railroads, power stations, video games, did what people asked of them, and, hell, in Mac Classic's case were more usable than XP-- they weren't good enough.

    Oh wait. No. Wrong. It doesn't work that way. OSes are a constant evolution, with each new version subtly improved enough that going back to the old version is painful. (Warning: car analogy incoming): It's like when you buy a new car, it's the same fundamental machine, and does the same fundamental task, but it's quieter, more powerful, easier to drive, more comfortable than the old version all at once, and driving a car from the 70s when you're used to cars from the 00s is a complete pain.

    But obviously DOS, NT3.5, Win32, Mac OS Classic, various Unixes, OS/360 and its namesakes, hell even BeOS and NeXT were "good enough" for a lot of people-- otherwise they never would have been released and sold on the open market.

    @Qwerty said:

    It was controllable for corporate environments (could be installed without Solitaire) and seems to play acceptably well with most other devices and networks that we are now accustomed to plugging in to our computers.

    The former applies to Windows 2000 also. The latter only applies because XP has been around so long that hardware has been built to conform to it, not the other way around. (Fortunately, that's changing.)

    @Qwerty said:

    Remember when it used to be important how many megahertz your processor was? It was important to get a system with the latest processor so you could play the latest games, CAD programs or whatever? Do you know the GHz speed of the computer in front of you now? It's probably "fast enough" and you don't need to know the exact GHz.

    Windows 7 will run on any computer that will run XP. It was slimmed-down to support the netbook market, without sacrificing any of the features Vista added for desktops. (Note: it does require more RAM.) It really is a very, very impressive product.

    @Qwerty said:

    If you buy a new washing machine for your laundry, it probably comes with a newer faster processor and better LED readouts. Does it wash the clothes any better than its 20-year old predecessor?

    Yes. It washes more clothes with less soap, less energy, less noise, and in less time. I mean, seriously? What washing machine did you buy recently that was worse than a 20-year-old one? Hell, two of those improvements (less soap, less energy) are required by Federal Law.

    @Qwerty said:

    No, it's "good enough" and doesn't need to be replaced when you get new clothes. So why should you replace your operating system when you get a new computer?

    The old model was "good enough". The new model is still better.

    @Qwerty said:

    XP has a lot of life left in it.

    2014, then hopefully people will dump it en masse when Microsoft does.

    @Qwerty said:

    As we go to smaller handheld devices, many of them are now running operating systems that get closer and closer to XP.

    But, notably, are not XP. Even Microsoft's handheld OS is based on much newer OS kernel than XP's. And Windows 7 runs just as well as XP on a netbook, and has better features for tablets-- so it's already more suited for smaller devices than XP is. Seriously. Try an XP tablet next to a Windows 7 tablet, and tell me which is a better OS choice.

    Think of OSes like video codecs: it's possible to create a new video codec that not only offers better video quality, but does so in less space-- my 1 GB MP4 rip of a movie now is of higher quality than (most of) my older 8 GB Mpeg2 DVDs. Same applies to OSes: Windows 7 is better than XP on both the high- and the low-end.

    (And the only reason Vista wasn't is that Microsoft, in a bit of uncharacteristically bad planning, didn't anticipate the netbook boom. Then again, to Microsoft's credit, it's starting to look like the netbook boom was mostly a fad anyway...)

    @PJH said:

    I read dhromed's sentence as containing one of each.

    Hey, Ringo, that was the joke!



  • @Zemm said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    making their TLAs accessible to other people
     

    OMG WTF LOL BBQ

    lern2read? Actual text, not quoted out of context:

    @blakeyrat said:

    It bugs the shit out of me that TLAs (three-letter acronyms) are taking over the universe and people are so FUCKING RUDE that they don't even bother making their TLAs accessible to other people by, say, DEFINING THEM? (Emphasis mine)

    This is something that I wholeheartedly agree with. There are even HTML tags for this, <abbr> and <acronym> (the split between these two of course is to get Semantics Nazis involved in exactly what does and what does not genuinely constitute an acronym. Or that the W3C can't write a spec to save their lives.)



  • @steenbergh said:

    This is one of the times that a BlakeyRant hits home. It pays to have explained POS stands for Point-Of-Sale, and not the more obvious option...

    Or Pinnock Organiser Services, who's repeated bodged attempts to repair my Psion Revo (I just wanted the battery to charge, so they killed a pixel, wrecked the digitiser and damaged the enter key and still left it unable to charge) makes me feel that their POS moniker could not be more apt.



  • @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    There are even HTML tags for this, <abbr> and <acronym> (the split between these two of course is to get Semantics Nazis involved in exactly what does and what does not genuinely constitute an acronym.

    An acronym is a type of abbreviation. So an acronym is always an abbreviation, but an abbreviation isn't necessarily an acronym. In this case, having both is probably redundant. (I mean, nobody cares what type of abbreviation it is, right? They just want the definition.)

    @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    Or that the W3C can't write a spec to save their lives.

    Knowing W3C, if they chose one of the two, they'd choose <acronym> because that would be the least correct choice.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    TLAs...So call it a pet peeve or whatever, but I think it's a noble quest to maintain our ability to communicate with each other without confusion.

    It's difficult to tune communication to the proper audience. I really became aware of this while studying math. A proof written for a professor, vs an undergrad, vs a high school geometry student are very different, and assume a very different level of knowledge on the part of the reader. Writing for a professor level audience, you can skip all sorts of stuff. But the undergrad needs every step carefully explained or he won't be able to follow. (The highschooler is probably cheating and not reading the proof anyways, so it doesn't really matter).

    The number of developer types on here no doubt lead the OP to figure that HLD was pretty straightforward. Of course, someone new to this forum might have trouble with stuff like TRWTF, IYKWIMAITTYD.

    So, in short, STFU.



  • @boomzilla said:

    The number of developer types on here no doubt lead the OP to figure that HLD was pretty straightforward.

    I've spent a lot of years developing software, and I've never come across the TLA "HLD" until this thread.

    But that's beside the point. This is just part of my general campaign against half-ass-ery:


    If you're trying to communicate with the rest of us, why wouldn't you communicate in a way that maximizes the number of comprehending readers? If you don't care to communicate with other people, you wouldn't type the post at all.

    So by typing the post, you're attempting to communicate with readers. By posting it publicly, you're attempting to communicate to as many readers as possible. But by not defining your terms, you're guaranteeing that some of those readers won't understand your post. Those two things don't compute in my strange alien way of thinking. ERROR! ERROR!

    @boomzilla said:

    IYKWIMAITTYD

    I have no fucking clue what that means. I think I worked it out once, but if I did, it's completely forgotten by now.

    I decree that from now on, it means: "I yak king with it, Massachusetts and it totally tramples your dad."



  • @boomzilla said:

    IYKWIMAITTYD.

    You know you have a good one when the first hit on google has "huge black cock again" in the title

    I mean, again?



  • @serguey123 said:

    @boomzilla said:

    IYKWIMAITTYD.

    You know you have a good one when the first hit on google has "huge black cock again" in the title

    I mean, again?

     

    Once is never enough.



  • @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    It bugs the shit out of me that TLAs (three-letter acronyms) are taking over the universe and people are so FUCKING RUDE that they don't even bother making their TLAs accessible to other people by, say, DEFINING THEM? (Emphasis mine)

    This is something that I wholeheartedly agree with. There are even HTML tags for this, <abbr> and <acronym> (the split between these two of course is to get Semantics Nazis involved in exactly what does and what does not genuinely constitute an acronym. Or that the W3C can't write a spec to save their lives.)

     

    You or someone much like you were no doubt responsible for the article I read in the paper the other day about the skyrocketing price of bacon, in which someone felt it necessary to explain what BLT stands for.

     



  • @blakeyrat said:

    I decree that from now on, it means: "I yak king with it, Massachusetts and it totally tramples your dad."

    TDEMSYR



  • @da Doctah said:

    @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    It bugs the shit out of me that TLAs (three-letter acronyms) are taking over the universe and people are so FUCKING RUDE that they don't even bother making their TLAs accessible to other people by, say, DEFINING THEM? (Emphasis mine)

    This is something that I wholeheartedly agree with. There are even HTML tags for this, <abbr> and <acronym> (the split between these two of course is to get Semantics Nazis involved in exactly what does and what does not genuinely constitute an acronym. Or that the W3C can't write a spec to save their lives.)

     

    You or someone much like you were no doubt responsible for the article I read in the paper the other day about the skyrocketing price of bacon, in which someone felt it necessary to explain what BLT stands for.

     

    That is the thing, I don't consider myself a totally ignorant person but I don't care much about bacon (I eat it but I'm not crazy about it) nor I'm a english speaking person so I don't know what BLT stand for and you should not expect me to google it to find out, that is akin to having a non intuitive UI, it is better to explain what BLT stand for, if you don't you might alienate the people reading because they might not understand, if you do there is a small chance they will piss pedantic dickweeds like you.  They made the correct choice



  • @serguey123 said:

    @da Doctah said:

    @Daniel Beardsmore said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    It bugs the shit out of me that TLAs (three-letter acronyms) are taking over the universe and people are so FUCKING RUDE that they don't even bother making their TLAs accessible to other people by, say, DEFINING THEM? (Emphasis mine)

    This is something that I wholeheartedly agree with. There are even HTML tags for this, <abbr> and <acronym> (the split between these two of course is to get Semantics Nazis involved in exactly what does and what does not genuinely constitute an acronym. Or that the W3C can't write a spec to save their lives.)

     

    You or someone much like you were no doubt responsible for the article I read in the paper the other day about the skyrocketing price of bacon, in which someone felt it necessary to explain what BLT stands for.

     

    That is the thing, I don't consider myself a totally ignorant person but I don't care much about bacon (I eat it but I'm not crazy about it) nor I'm a english speaking person so I don't know what BLT stand for and you should not expect me to google it to find out, that is akin to having a non intuitive UI, it is better to explain what BLT stand for, if you don't you might alienate the people reading because they might not understand, if you do there is a small chance they will piss pedantic dickweeds like you.  They made the correct choice

     

     

    I minor hate of mine is Subway sandwiches place, in particular one conference centre where I have to go there because of little sensible choice,.  A massive annoyance is asking for a BLT and they ask if you want cheese, olives peppers onions etc on it.

    "... no thanks, i was after a BLT thank you"

     



  • What the hell? You mean that, in your opinion, when an individual asks for a BLT, it should be made with only bacon, lettuce, and tomatoes unless the person ordering states otherwise? Do you get all pissed off when people make "lasagna" that is anything but pasta? Fuck it, maybe I just got trolled.



  • @da Doctah said:

    You or someone much like you were no doubt responsible for the article I read in the paper the other day about the skyrocketing price of bacon, in which someone felt it necessary to explain what BLT stands for.
    Bissexuals, Lesbians and Transsexuals? You forgot Gays.



  • @Power Troll said:

    What the hell? You mean that, in your opinion, when an individual asks for a BLT, it should be made with only bacon, lettuce, and tomatoes unless the person ordering states otherwise? Do you get all pissed off when people make "lasagna" that is anything but pasta? Fuck it, maybe I just got trolled.

    They're good with a slice of avacado. BLTA, I guess.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Power Troll said:
    What the hell? You mean that, in your opinion, when an individual asks for a BLT, it should be made with only bacon, lettuce, and tomatoes unless the person ordering states otherwise? Do you get all pissed off when people make "lasagna" that is anything but pasta? Fuck it, maybe I just got trolled.

    They're good with a slice of avacado. BLTA, I guess.

     

    That's a BLAT, but so is a BLT with alfalfa sprouts.  Must be a California thing.

     



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Yes. All OSes used before XP were not good enough. Even though they ran railroads, power stations, video games, did what people asked of them

    No, I am saying XP is "good enough" in an absolute, platonic sense.  Yes, previous operating systems could run power stations or games but you would get laughed out of the room if you tried to suggest one operating system could do both.  In 2011, you can say OSX or Linux is "good enough" to do both of those tasks.

    @blakeyrat said:

    It's like when you buy a new car, it's the same fundamental machine, and does the same fundamental task, but it's quieter, more powerful, easier to drive, more comfortable than the old version all at once, and driving a car from the 70s when you're used to cars from the 00s is a complete pain.

    Yes. A modern not-too-expensive family car has more power, better tyres, brakes and handles better than a "supercar" from the 70s. I believe that cars haven't reached that "good enough" stage yet.  They must be pretty close because speed limits haven't changed much since the 70s.  (55mph in the USA is an aberration from the oil shock and not representative of speed limits in the rest of the world.)

    Try an aviation analogy: supersonic passenger aircraft.  The Boeing 747 was designed at the same time as the Concorde.  The 747 was expected to be a freighter, because Boeing expected passengers to travel supersonic. But it turns out that Mach 0.85 is "good enough" for almost anyone going anywhere on Earth. So current aircraft in that class (including the Airbus A380) are simply incremental improvements over the basic 747 and there isn't a higher class.  Even billionaires can't buy supersonic aircraft to travel around in. The fastest private jet doesn't go much over Mach 0.9.

    @blakeyrat said:

    Yes. It washes more clothes with less soap, less energy, less noise, and in less time. I mean, seriously? What washing machine did you buy recently that was worse than a 20-year-old one? Hell, two of those improvements (less soap, less energy) are required by Federal Law.

    But the clothes aren't washed any better and I haven't changed the size of the scoop I use to put the soap in.  In fact, due to those federal regulations, newer machines tend to be smaller and wash less dirt out. Dishwashers are a more extreme example where "eco mode" can result in unacceptable washing effectiveness.

    @blakeyrat said:

    Think of OSes like video codecs: it's possible to create a new video codec that not only offers better video quality, but does so in less space-- my 1 GB MP4 rip of a movie now is of higher quality than (most of) my older 8 GB Mpeg2 DVDs.

    Another example of a field that hasn't reached "good enough" yet. Try still image compression.  JPEG is good enough for almost everyone, for every purpose. PNG is better for many reasons but it may never replace JPEG.  RAW and GIF have some specific uses that JPEG can't accomodate.  I'm confident that when we're storing gigaquads of information in biopacks (Star Trek Voyager) we'll still be able to decode JPEG images and display them on the viewscreen.



  • @Qwerty said:

    Yes, previous operating systems could run power stations or games but you would get laughed out of the room if you tried to suggest one operating system could do both.

    NT4 did both. As did Windows 2000. So... wrong.

    @Qwerty said:

    (55mph in the USA is an aberration from the oil shock and not representative of speed limits in the rest of the world.)

    What the... am I in a time warp, are you living in the early 90s? (Protip: the Federal speed limit was repealed in 1995; states set their own limits now.)

    @Qwerty said:

    Try an aviation analogy: supersonic passenger aircraft.  The Boeing 747 was designed at the same time as the Concorde.  The 747 was expected to be a freighter, because Boeing expected passengers to travel supersonic. But it turns out that Mach 0.85 is "good enough" for almost anyone going anywhere on Earth. So current aircraft in that class (including the Airbus A380) are simply incremental improvements over the basic 747 and there isn't a higher class.  Even billionaires can't buy supersonic aircraft to travel around in. The fastest private jet doesn't go much over Mach 0.9.

    Except supersonic jets suck. They're cramped, loud, require long runways, hard to pilot, have little cargo capacity, and they spew nasty exhaust at an incredible rate. You're an idiot if you think the Concorde is better than a 747 at anything except pure speed. Boeing wisely cancelled their SST program before sinking too much money into it.

    And "the" 747 is under constant revision; a 747-8 built today is superior in almost every way over the original 747-100. (Enough so that Wikipedia actually lists the -8 as a separate aircraft on its own page.) It's on-par with the A-380 in every respect except passenger capacity.

    Moreover, I'd argue that the 777 and 787 are vast improvements over previous models. A plane the size of a 777 running safely on two engines? You'd have to be pretty fucking jaded to not be impressed by that. Or the 787, comparable to the 767, but consuming 20% less fuel? That's some amazing shit.

    @Qwerty said:

    But the clothes aren't washed any better and I haven't changed the size of the scoop I use to put the soap in.

    You should be using less soap, if you have a newer machine. If you're putting in an entire scoop in a modern washer, you're doing it wrong.

    @Qwerty said:

    n fact, due to those federal regulations, newer machines tend to be smaller and wash less dirt out.

    Evidence?

    @Qwerty said:

    Dishwashers are a more extreme example where "eco mode" can result in unacceptable washing effectiveness.

    Evidence?

    @Qwerty said:

    Try still image compression.  JPEG is good enough for almost everyone, for every purpose. PNG is better for many reasons but it may never replace JPEG.

    PNG isn't designed to replace JPG. I'm starting to think you're an idiot.

    @Qwerty said:

    I'm confident that when we're storing gigaquads of information in biopacks (Star Trek Voyager) we'll still be able to decode JPEG images and display them on the viewscreen.

    And why not?



  • @Power Troll said:

    What the hell? You mean that, in your opinion, when an individual asks for a BLT, it should be made with only bacon, lettuce, and tomatoes unless the person ordering states otherwise? Do you get all pissed off when people make "lasagna" that is anything but pasta? Fuck it, maybe I just got trolled.
     

    "Here you go sir, Steak and French Fries"....  "Oh by-the-way steaks served at blakeygrill are frittered cow ears and our french fries are steamed sweet potato, this is the chefs signature dish, enjoy!"



  • @Power Troll said:

    You mean that, in your opinion, when an individual asks for a BLT, it should be made with only bacon, lettuce, and tomatoes unless the person ordering states otherwise?
    Erm... yes. Unless you're talking about the bun/bread.@Power Troll said:
    Do you get all pissed off when people make "lasagna" that is anything but pasta?
    Considering "lasagna" implies stuff other than just pasta (meat and/or veg,) probably.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Qwerty said:
    Dishwashers are a more extreme example where "eco mode" can result in unacceptable washing effectiveness.

    Evidence?

    Oh, come on, that's why you tend to have several settings like water saver, normal and pots and pans. OTOH, detergents are getting worse as they try to be "eco friendly."



  • @boomzilla said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    Evidence?

    Oh, come on, [don't be ridiculous]

    @boomzilla said:

    yo, bipch, here's some evidence

    Make up your mind.

    Thx for the link.

     

     



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @boomzilla said:
    IYKWIMAITTYD

    I have no fucking clue what that means. I think I worked it out once, but if I did, it's completely forgotten by now.

    I decree that from now on, it means: "I yak king with it, Massachusetts and it totally tramples your dad."

    "If you know what I mean" I had gotten. I like your version for the rest of it.



  • @boomzilla said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    @Qwerty said:
    Dishwashers are a more extreme example where "eco mode" can result in unacceptable washing effectiveness.

    Evidence?

    Oh, come on, that's why you tend to have several settings like water saver, normal and pots and pans. OTOH, detergents are getting worse as they try to be "eco friendly."

    Qwerty is suffering from that mind-wasting disease known as "nostalgia."



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Qwerty is suffering from that mind-wasting disease known as "nostalgia."

    Nostalgia isn't as good as it used to be. :( I'm not going to blame the environMENTALists, but I will say they sure aren't helping the issue. Siiiigh...



  • @Xyro said:

    Nostalgia isn't as good as it used to be. :(
    That joke used to be funnier.



  • @Qwerty said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    Yes. All OSes used before XP were not good enough. Even though they ran railroads, power stations, video games, did what people asked of them

    No, I am saying XP is "good enough" in an absolute, platonic sense.  Yes, previous operating systems could run power stations or games but you would get laughed out of the room if you tried to suggest one operating system could do both.  

      Sure; who even needs an OS when 1KB of RAM and a BASIC interpreter in ROM is enough to "do quite literally anything"?


    most powerful computer ever?


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