I can't wait to watch this movie!



  • Found on Netflix's new movies RSS feed:



  • Eh, I will wait for the sequel Example 9 hour 59.987 Remote Content: an example of 60 frames per second.



  • @delta534 said:

    Eh, I will wait for the sequel Example 9 hour 59.987 Remote Content: an example of 60 frames per second.
    Except that would be 59.94



  • Ugh, this brings back unpleasant memories of video syncing at the animation studio I used to work at. NTSC is an annoying format, they tried to cram 30 frames per second into a 60Hz signal but didn't quite make it. Instead, they have 29.97 frames and each frame is actually made up of two interlaced fields. So not only is it a wacky rate, it's a horrible picture to edit.

    When you're converting pure 24 fps footage to NTSC, you can do a pulldown to get 23.976, but some editors like final cut pro like to call that 29.98. However, if you use effects software that's frame-accurate, inputting 29.98 as the frame rate will start to drift slightly compared to the actual 29.976 footage and audio will go out of sync. It's ridiculous. I remember having to always always remember to check if editors were using 29.98 fps and then use 29.976 in After Effects (or whatever) to make sure it didn't drift.

    The fact that HD actually has pure 24 fps is a god-sent, but we had to deliver both HD and SD footage most of the time, hence the nightmare. While we never had to use it, it bugged me that they kept interlacing in the HD spec. In all cases, interlacing is simply a means to reduce the data rate by sending every other line (half the image) rather than the entire image at once.

    And now you know (GI JOE)



  • @Soviut said:

    The fact that HD actually has pure 24 fps is a god-sent

    Good/terrible story. I've always been curious about why such a relatively low frame-rate was chosen for HD. Without invoking XKCD links from anyone, do you have any insight as to why 24 was agreed to be ideal instead of something more like twice that value? I can't imagine that there isn't enough bandwidth in this day and age, but I very well may be underestimating it.



  • @Soviut said:

    When you're converting pure 24 fps footage to NTSC, you can do a pulldown to get 23.976, but some editors like final cut pro like to call that 29.98. However, if you use effects software that's frame-accurate, inputting 29.98 as the frame rate will start to drift slightly compared to the actual 29.976 footage and audio will go out of sync. It's ridiculous. I remember having to always always remember to check if editors were using 29.98 fps and then use 29.976 in After Effects (or whatever) to make sure it didn't drift.
     

    I would think that would be a common enough problem for an app like final cut pro to consider.

    In fact, I'd even think they'd have some kind of pre-set "24 fps to NTSC" option.



  • @Xyro said:

    @Soviut said:
    The fact that HD actually has pure 24 fps is a god-sent

    Good/terrible story. I've always been curious about why such a relatively low frame-rate was chosen for HD. Without invoking XKCD links from anyone, do you have any insight as to why 24 was agreed to be ideal instead of something more like twice that value? I can't imagine that there isn't enough bandwidth in this day and age, but I very well may be underestimating it.

    Movies are filmed at 24 full frames/second. Most hdtv's support several framerates besides 24fps.



  • @Xyro said:

    I've always been curious about why such a relatively low frame-rate was chosen for HD.
     

    Because it's just fine for movies. Even games are fine and playable at 24fps (though obv you really want 30+), and recorded motion picture is not nearly as demanding as games. So, 24.



  • @Soviut said:

    Ugh, this brings back unpleasant memories of video syncing at the animation studio I used to work at
     

    By any chance, was it Anchor Bay, who mudged up the fps on the Reboot Season 4 DVD:

    @Wikipedia, who else? said:

    It was improperly mastered as the 25 fps source material was treated as 24 fps film speed material, meaning 3:2 pulldown
    flags were encoded into the MPEG stream, which resulted in the video
    playing back 4.096% slower and all the voices sounding deeper.



  • The actual frame rates should be 24000/1001 and 30000/1001.



  • @Lorne Kates said:

    @Soviut said:

    Ugh, this brings back unpleasant memories of video syncing at the animation studio I used to work at
     

    By any chance, was it Anchor Bay, who mudged up the fps on the Reboot Season 4 DVD:

    @Wikipedia, who else? said:

    It was improperly mastered as the 25 fps source material was treated as 24 fps film speed material, meaning 3:2 pulldown
    flags were encoded into the MPEG stream, which resulted in the video
    playing back 4.096% slower and all the voices sounding deeper.

    That's not usually a mistake. That's often done intentionally, especially during broadcast, because you can fit in 4% more commercials. I'm not joking. It's a really common thing to do in Europe, and it's not at all surprising to see it done as a quick/cheap way to convert to DVD for that market.

    I work on FCP, and all I can say is that we have to deal with a lot of legacy BS. And when I say legacy, I don't mean supporting DOS stuff from the 80s. I mean supporting decisions based on hardware from the 1950s. It sucks, but we don't have any choice. Most people in the industry don't understand this stuff (myself included at times), so it's entirely possible we get some of it wrong. Please file bugs if it affects your work.



  • If you search for "Example" in the title box, you find many more, including megaseries with multiple episodes!



  • @dcardani said:

    @Lorne Kates said:

    @Soviut said:

    Ugh, this brings back unpleasant memories of video syncing at the animation studio I used to work at
     

    By any chance, was it Anchor Bay, who mudged up the fps on the Reboot Season 4 DVD:

    @Wikipedia, who else? said:

    It was improperly mastered as the 25 fps source material was treated as 24 fps film speed material, meaning 3:2 pulldown
    flags were encoded into the MPEG stream, which resulted in the video
    playing back 4.096% slower and all the voices sounding deeper.

    That's not usually a mistake. That's often done intentionally, especially during broadcast, because you can fit in 4% more commercials.

     

    Wouldn't you want to run it 4% faster, instead of slower?

     



  •  This motion picture has been formatted to fit your screen, edited for content, time-compressed to fit the available scheduling slot, translated into Urdu, and ultimately replaced by "Chairman of the Board", starring Carrot Top.



  • The real WTF being that we continiously develop new and awesome technology and step one of deploying it is tying its hands and hampering it down with restrictions and firmware to make it conform to standards that are 60+ years old.

     


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