WTFs in all walks of life



  • ... in particular a guy on my wife's nursing course (many years ago) she was telling us about the other day.

    1: When attending to a bed-bound person's eliminatory needs, he sat her down on a commode which he placed on top of the bedsheets.

    2: Gave a patient their entire supply of pills for the day in one go rather than "two every six hours" or whatever.

    3: When asked to heat up some blood for a transfusion, he emptied it all out of the bag into a saucepan and put it on the stove.

    The last mistake was the one which caused the dismissal of this student nurse, as well it might.



    We think we've got problems.



  • @Matt Westwood said:

    When asked to heat up some blood for a transfusion, he emptied it all out of the bag into a saucepan and put it on the stove.
    Idiot. Should have let it coagulate and then fry, not roast.



  •  @Matt Westwood said:

    3: When asked to heat up some blood for a transfusion, he emptied it all out of the bag into a saucepan and put it on the stove.
    Was the Microwave broken?



  • @Matt Westwood said:

    When asked to heat up some blood for a transfusion, he emptied it all out of the bag into a saucepan and put it on the stove.
     

    At first I was incredulous, but then I remembered back in college I was roommates with a nursing student who just might have done something like this. Was his name Martin, by any chance?



  • @Zecc said:

    @Matt Westwood said:

    When asked to heat up some blood for a transfusion, he emptied it all out of the bag into a saucepan and put it on the stove.
    Idiot. Should have let it coagulate and then fry, not roast.

     

    How do you roast in a saucepan on a stove?



  • Not Martin, his name was Ian, apparently.

    Oh yes, and here's another one: when he was told to wash the false teeth of all the elderly patients on the ward, he put them all in the same bucket at once, and nobody had a record of whose teeth belonged to whom.



  • @Mole said:

     @Matt Westwood said:

    3: When asked to heat up some blood for a transfusion, he emptied it all out of the bag into a saucepan and put it on the stove.
    Was the Microwave broken?

    He'd wandered round for half an hour looking for a skewer so he could spit-roast it, but gave up and went the saucepan route.

    No, but seriously, apparently he cost the hospital five grand with that little escapade.

    I confess that this story actually distresses me more than I would have expected.



  • @Matt Westwood said:

    Not Martin, his name was Ian, apparently.

    Oh yes, and here's another one: when he was told to wash the false teeth of all the elderly patients on the ward, he put them all in the same bucket at once, and nobody had a record of whose teeth belonged to whom.


    I sense an awkward Cinderella type situation ensuing...



  • @Zemm said:

    @Zecc said:

    @Matt Westwood said:

    When asked to heat up some blood for a transfusion, he emptied it all out of the bag into a saucepan and put it on the stove.
    Idiot. Should have let it coagulate and then fry, not roast.

     

    How do you roast in a saucepan on a stove?

    I initially read that as "in a stove" rather than "on a stove". My mistake.

    You see, when thinking in English, I call the enclosed part a stove, while the top part with the burners I call a cooker.



  • @Zecc said:

    @Zemm said:

    @Zecc said:

    @Matt Westwood said:

    When asked to heat up some blood for a transfusion, he emptied it all out of the bag into a saucepan and put it on the stove.
    Idiot. Should have let it coagulate and then fry, not roast.

     

    How do you roast in a saucepan on a stove?

    I initially read that as "in a stove" rather than "on a stove". My mistake.

    You see, when thinking in English, I call the enclosed part a stove, while the top part with the burners I call a cooker.

    That would be an oven. In colloquial usage, a cooker/stove can refer to the hob - bit with the burners - or to the whole shebang where oven and hob are built into one unit.



  • @intertravel said:

    That would be an oven. In colloquial usage, a cooker/stove can refer to the hob - bit with the burners - or to the whole shebang where oven and hob are built into one unit.

    I call it a "flurf." As in, "please put those kittens in the flurf and turn on the gas, we need something to weigh down that tarp."



  • @Zecc said:

    @Matt Westwood said:

    When asked to heat up some blood for a transfusion, he emptied it all out of the bag into a saucepan and put it on the stove.
    Idiot. Should have let it coagulate and then fry, not roast.

    Receipe for halal???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????



  •  @Matt Westwood said:

    Not Martin, his name was Ian, apparently.

    Oh yes, and here's another one: when he was told to wash the false teeth of all the elderly patients on the ward, he put them all in the same bucket at once, and nobody had a record of whose teeth belonged to whom.

    Hey, I'll bite.  Someone that lacking in common sense would never have made it out of nursing school.  You have to be at least a little intelligent to figure out how to study for all the tests they throw at you.  



  •  @dogbrags said:

     @Matt Westwood said:

    Not Martin, his name was Ian, apparently.

    Oh yes, and here's another one: when he was told to wash the false teeth of all the elderly patients on the ward, he put them all in the same bucket at once, and nobody had a record of whose teeth belonged to whom.

    Hey, I'll bite.  Someone that lacking in common sense would never have made it out of nursing school.  You have to be at least a little intelligent to figure out how to study for all the tests they throw at you.  

    Intelligence and common sense are not the same thing.  A lot of the most intelligent people I know, lack common sense in some situations. 



  • @DescentJS said:

    Intelligence and common sense are not the same thing.  A lot of the most intelligent people I know, lack common sense in some situations. 
     

    I would argue that a degree in nursing (as with anything else that involves the safety of human life, like pilots, firefighters, police, etc.) require both.



  • @Matt Westwood said:

    Oh yes, and here's another one: when he was told to wash the false teeth of all the elderly patients on the ward, he put them all in the same bucket at once, and nobody had a record of whose teeth belonged to whom.
     

    Fortunately, I keep my false teeth numbered for just such an occasion.

     BTW, giving all the day's pills to a patient at one time could easily kill the patient (depending on the drugs, of course), so why was he even given a chance after that?



  • @jetcitywoman said:

    BTW, giving all the day's pills to a patient at one time could easily kill the patient (depending on the drugs, of course), so why was he even given a chance after that?
     

    I question whether "all the day's pills at one time" means he had them swallow all of them at once or just "here's your pills, take one now, another at noon, another a dinner time, and one more right before you settle down for the night".  Depending upon the patient that second option might actually work, but given the number of patients with defective memories, bad understanding skills, and just plain orneriness, I suspect the admins would still frown on it.



  • @DescentJS said:

    Intelligence and common sense are not the same thing.  A lot of the most intelligent people I know, lack common sense in some situations. 
     

    Nothing quite as senseless as common sense.

     

    I was looking for a way to write down the things I invent when messing with my bass, and mused to my musician friend that I might--very easily!-- put some lines on paper and print them out.

    "Or, you could but a fat stack of music paper."

    "Oh. Right."



  • @dogbrags said:

    Hey, I'll bite.  Someone that lacking in common sense would never have made it out of nursing school.  You have to be at least a little intelligent to figure out how to study for all the tests they throw at you.
     

    Oh I could tell you some things about a (then-student-) nurse who lived near her when they were at uni! The consensus is that they just let her pass (barely).


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