Drinking warm water instead of cold



  • I have ayurveda book that recommend drinking warm water or room temp water after and during meals.
    This will aid process of digestion to faciliate smooth bowel movement.

    Do you guys drink water? How much each day? What temperature?



  • @Nagesh said:

    I have ayurveda book that recommend drinking warm water or room temp water after and during meals.
    This will aid process of digestion to faciliate smooth bowel movement.

    Do you guys drink water? How much each day? What temperature?

    I drink my water almost scalding hot. Hot enough that I need a ceramic mug to hold it. To flavor it, I let the water run though a bundle of ground coffee beans wrapped in filter paper. My company actually has a machine here that does it automatically, it's pretty slick.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    I drink my water almost scalding hot. Hot enough that I need a ceramic mug to hold it. To flavor it, I let the water run though a bundle of ground coffee beans wrapped in filter paper. My company actually has a machine here that does it automatically, it's pretty slick.
    Yeah, but the bowel movements that it facilitates aren't exactly smooth.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Nagesh said:
    I have ayurveda book that recommend drinking warm water or room temp water after and during meals.
    This will aid process of digestion to faciliate smooth bowel movement.

    Do you guys drink water? How much each day? What temperature?

    I drink my water almost scalding hot. Hot enough that I need a ceramic mug to hold it. To flavor it, I let the water run though a bundle of ground coffee beans wrapped in filter paper. My company actually has a machine here that does it automatically, it's pretty slick.

    We have coffee machine too, but drinking too much cofee causes Insomina and constipation.

    I know I have been a constipated insomniac on most weekdays.



  • @Nagesh said:

    I have ayurveda book that recommend drinking warm water or room temp water after and during meals. This will aid process of digestion to faciliate smooth bowel movement. Do you guys drink water? How much each day? What temperature?

    I live in a very hot and humid country so I'll always prefer rough bowel movements to warm water



  • @serguey123 said:

    @Nagesh said:

    I have ayurveda book that recommend drinking warm water or room temp water after and during meals. This will aid process of digestion to faciliate smooth bowel movement. Do you guys drink water? How much each day? What temperature?

    I live in a very hot and humid country so I'll always prefer rough bowel movements to warm water

    The climate of andhra pradesh is similar to place you're currently living.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    I only drink water directly when I'm racing - which is a severe heatstroke-and-dehydration risk - and in those situations I adhere to the 1 case of bottled water (about 3 gallons) per person per day rule - essentially I fnish one bottle and immediately pick up the next. In the car itself, a 120oz hydration bladder goes in with the driver, and had damn well better come out at least half empty 2 hours later. Any less literally is risking dehydration under those conditions. As for temperature, as close to freezing as is practical - it helps knock down core body temperature and ward off heatstroke. Despite doing the exact opposite of your recommendations, I STILL don't have any problems taking a crap.

     

    During normal life, on the other hand, all my water comes to me by way of coffee and soda.



  • @Weng said:

    I only drink water directly when I'm racing - which is a severe heatstroke-and-dehydration risk - and in those situations I adhere to the 1 case of bottled water (about 3 gallons) per person per day rule - essentially I fnish one bottle and immediately pick up the next. In the car itself, a 120oz hydration bladder goes in with the driver, and had damn well better come out at least half empty 2 hours later. Any less literally is risking dehydration under those conditions. As for temperature, as close to freezing as is practical - it helps knock down core body temperature and ward off heatstroke. Despite doing the exact opposite of your recommendations, I STILL don't have any problems taking a crap.

     

    During normal life, on the other hand, all my water comes to me by way of coffee and soda.

    What kidn of racing? Do you need to take toilet breaks?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

     @Nagesh said:

    What kidn of racing? Do you need to take toilet breaks?

    This kind.

    Infineon 24 Hours of Lemons, 3-26-11 – 10:35
    — CaliforniaAdventurer

    Endurance racing for shitty cars. There's between 14 and 24 hours of racing each weekend - you have to rotate between a minimum of 4 drivers for safety reasons. Almost everyone does a driver change whenever they need fuel - so roughly every 2 hours. Bathroom breaks before then? Hahaha no. Iron bladder for you. Though when you're actually in the car, you tend to be sweating so much that urination is WAY down on your body's list of things to do with water - you're wrapped in 3-5 layers of insulative material, wearing a giant helmet, with an ambient outside temperature of 90F+, with all kinds of radiant heat coming off the engine and exhaust. There's only minimal airflow to cool you down because of the helmet and its fireproofing features.

    When you're not in the car, toilet breaks are pretty damned frequent.



  • @Weng said:

    In the car itself, a 120oz hydration bladder goes in with the driver, and had damn well better come out at least half empty 2 hours later

    120oz is about 3.5 litres according to google (I thought an ounce was a unit of weight? You learn something every day). I usually drink about 2 litres a day just sitting around the office. I do piss like a stallion though. Sitting in zircon makes you thirsty, but you don't sweat much.



  • @Zemm said:

    120oz is about 3.5 litres according to google (I thought an ounce was a unit of weight? You learn something every day).

    Those ounces are actually fluid ounces (fl oz), although 1 fl oz = 1 oz when you're measuring water, hence the misleading saying, "A pint is a pound the world round." Which is only true if you're not using British pints, which are 20fl oz, not 16fl oz, as American pints are.

    A pint is defined as an eighth of a gallon. Apparently, the Americans based their pint on the wine gallon, and the British later redefined a gallon to be 10 pounds of distilled water.



  • @Zemm said:

    @Weng said:
    In the car itself, a 120oz hydration bladder goes in with the driver, and had damn well better come out at least half empty 2 hours later

    120oz is about 3.5 litres according to google (I thought an ounce was a unit of weight? You learn something every day). I usually drink about 2 litres a day just sitting around the office. I do piss like a stallion though. Sitting in zircon makes you thirsty, but you don't sweat much.

    We get more mileage out of our beautiful measurement system by recycling measures. That's why ounce is both weight and volume, and that's why pound is both weight and force. See? It's more efficient than metric.



  • Pound: NOt just unit of measure, but also lots of things.



  • @Nagesh said:

    Pound: NOt just unit of measure, but also lots of things.

    Ex: CPound



  •  @Zemm said:

    120oz is about 3.5 litres according to google (I thought an ounce was a unit of weight? You learn something every day)

    Not directed directly at you, but a more general rant: How can it be 2011 and "technical" people be unaware of various commonly-used measurement systems? (Yes, the US system counts as "common".) Here in the US, even though we don't commonly use SI, we are actually taught SI (and the British gallon) in school (at least as an engineer).  Is it really the case that predominantly SI-countries don't teach the other systems?



  • @Nagesh said:

    drinking too much cofee causes constipation
    Clearly you're drinking the wrong kind of coffee. Try frappé on an empty stomach. Laxatives have nothing on it.

    @too_many_usernames said:

    How can it be 2011 and "technical" people be unaware of various commonly-used measurement systems?
    Some of us just don't care any more. I mean come one, short tons and long tons? Really?



  • @DOA said:

    Some of us just don't care any more.

    I think I rest my case.



  • @too_many_usernames said:

    @DOA said:

    Some of us just don't care any more.

    I think I rest my case.

    Most of the countries that are "holier than thou" about using metric don't use metric for everything. In fact, you can pretty much tell how much metric a country actually uses based on how much they brag about it... the more bragging there is, the more likely they're still measuring speed in miles per hour, or liquids in pints and gallons, or weight of people in "stones".

    I also find it funny with pro-metric people use arguments that are demonstrably false. For example, that using our own system hurts the economy... yeah! You guys keep on bailing out Greece and Iceland, and make sure to tell us how bad our economy's doing!



  • @blakeyrat said:

    I also find it funny with pro-metric people use arguments that are demonstrably false. For example, that using our own system hurts the economy... yeah! You guys keep on bailing out Greece and Iceland, and make sure to tell us how bad our economy's doing!

    Yeah, that seems like a pretty silly contention. Of all the things fucking up the US economy, not using the metric system has to be somewhere after the threat of John Edwards going to Supercuts.

    Of course, most arguments from the metrically enamored seem pretty silly.



  • @too_many_usernames said:

    Not directed directly at you, but a more general rant: How can it be 2011 and "technical" people be unaware of various commonly-used measurement systems?
     

    You learn what you use.

    @too_many_usernames said:

    Here in the US, even though we don't commonly use SI, we are actually taught SI (and the British gallon) in school (at least as an engineer)

    I think only as an engineer or similarly highly educated person.

    I would be  surprised if US middle school and community college had anything to say about SI except "hey, it exists".

    @too_many_usernames said:

    Is it really the case that predominantly SI-countries don't teach the other systems.
     

    Yes.



  • @dhromed said:

    I would be  surprised if US middle school and community college had anything to say about SI except "hey, it exists".

    Actually, it's probably taught as much or more as non-SI units in school. Certainly in my daughter's elementary school. And that's not too different than what I remember. It's supposed to have been our official system since the 70's. There are lots of things that you can buy that are measured in, e.g., liters.



  • @DOA said:

    I mean come one, short tons and long tons? Really?
     

    Yep. It's true bullshit.

    I can't speak for other European countries, but here in Dutchland we have pounds and ounces. It's just that they're used colloquially only, and are precisely 500 and 100 grams, respectively.

     

    PS
    As a reminder to Americans: there exist pretty vast cultural differences
    between Euro nations. Remember that. I personally don't think it's
    approriate (yet) to lump it all together and call it Europe. I hope this changes over the next five decades, but language barriers are far more powerful than the squiggly lines on a map.



  • @boomzilla said:

    It's supposed to have been our official system since the 70's. There are lots of things that you can buy that are measured in, e.g., liters.
     

    Ah, but what kind of litres? 😉


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @dhromed said:

    I would be  surprised if US middle school and community college had anything to say about SI except "hey, it exists".
    My middle school was STRICTLY SI, as was high school. In college I avoided taking classes that had units in them smaller than an AU. Why do I still use the bastard US system? Because all the units are so handy in size. They represent useful quantities of things. In SI, virtually all the common units are small enough that you need a frakking crapton of them, or large enough thaat you need a fraction, otherwise you need to use stupid off-label units like 'decimeters'  which will leave most audiences with a look on their face like you just said 'gigagallons'



  • @dhromed said:

    @boomzilla said:
    There are lots of things that you can buy that are measured in, e.g., liters.

    Ah, but what kind of litres? 😉

    I've never noticed any kind of litres, but the liters are carbonated, mostly.



  • @dhromed said:

    I can't speak for other European countries, but here in Dutchland we have pounds and ounces. It's just that they're used colloquially only, and are precisely 500 and 100 grams, respectively.
     

     TRWTF: "How many ounces in a pound?"  "Five."



  • @serguey123 said:

    Ex: CPound

     

    A software librarian once asked me if we used "C Number."  Good times.



  • @too_many_usernames said:

     @Zemm said:

    120oz is about 3.5 litres according to google (I thought an ounce was a unit of weight? You learn something every day)

    Not directed directly at you, but a more general rant: How can it be 2011 and "technical" people be unaware of various commonly-used measurement systems? (Yes, the US system counts as "common".) Here in the US, even though we don't commonly use SI, we are actually taught SI (and the British gallon) in school (at least as an engineer).  Is it really the case that predominantly SI-countries don't teach the other systems?

    I was having a slight jab at using "oz" instead of "fl oz". I have an old housewives' cookbook that uses those units. I don't really remember learning about non-metric measurements at school, other than "they exist". For example I still don't know how many feet in a mile or pounds in a stone (or even how many rods to the hogshead my car gets), and would have to look it up if it were required. I went to catholic schools and they did teach about other religions; the entire measurement system debate is on the same order. 🙂

    Australia has been fully metric since the early 1970s, at least officially, which was well before I was born. When my son was born his weight was recorded as 4.32kg. Tell people this and some will gasp. Tell them 9lb 8oz and more people will gasp. He was a big boy. The (now) grandmothers knew their babies in the "old money" so one still has to convert for them. People still generally refer to one's height in feet/inches but weight is always in kilograms. I was in Japan two years ago and a common question to me was "nan senti" - "how many centimetres" because I am 200cm tall, so I guess Japan never really used feet/inches.

    It's still weird to me to use "120oz", since it is like an improper fraction. Should really use a bigger unit, as the next biggest unit is only 16oz. Reminds me of an old 1250mL drink bottles that quickly became to 1.25L. There are still 600mL and 2L bottles though. I did engineering too. It was a laugh that civil engineers used millimetres (who mostly worked on things many metres long) and the mechanical engineers worked in metres, where things were often less than 1m.

    did you also learn about other "common" non-US non-SI units of measurement? The only one I can think of is tatami. Or the various beer glass sizes 😉 mmm schooner of carlton draught (no, I do not want a pot of gold, I might be a Queenslander but that doesn't mean I like XXXX)



  • @Zemm said:

    I don't really remember learning about non-metric measurements at school, other than "they exist". For example I still don't know how many feet in a mile or pounds in a stone (or even how many rods to the hogshead my car gets), and would have to look it up if it were required.

    I went through public school in the good ol' USA, and never learned our system of measurement. Well, that's not true... we spent maybe a week on it, and never reviewed it. Whereas metric we spent months on and reviewed every year.

    Either:

    1) The teachers were projecting-- "oh everybody knows what a pound is, but nobody knows these newfangled grams, so we better teach grams more!"

    2) Or they genuinely thought the US was going to go metric any day now. But by the mid-80s, was anybody even still taking about it? My impression is that the metric conversion died in the late-70s.



  • This is worth a look: http://chiefio.wordpress.com/2009/06/13/making-an-english-foot/

    As a pendulum becomes of lesser swing, it becomes more consistent, so modern pendulum clocks use a very short swing. It also becomes longer by a little bit. This is also why the commercial “seconds pendulum clocks” have a pendulum longer than a yard (a bit over 39 inches) and approaching a meter. To some extent, the move from a yard, to a seconds clock pendulum, to the meter can be seen as changing the length of the swing of the pendulum from an easy to observe by hand and eye rather large 84 degrees of arc, to something much much smaller, but more consistent and precise.

    The article makes a decent case for Imperial units as a whole being designed/suitable for ease of approximation, where metric was designed/has become useful for accurate (scientific) measurement and exact calculation.



  • @intertravel said:

    The article makes a decent case for Imperial units as a whole being designed/suitable for ease of approximation, where metric was designed/has become useful for accurate (scientific) measurement and exact calculation.

    That's pretty common-knowledge, right? Both liters and meters seem extremely inconvenient. A person shouldn't need 2 places of decimal points to roughly describe their height.

    Edit: you also have to remember that:
    1) Our ancestors weren't stupid
    2) The US customary system (and imperial system on which its based) was in competition with many other systems during its entire lifetime and lasted the longest
    3) Metric has a huge "it's not the British system" that fueled its adoption, much like how OS X and Linux adoption is fueled primarily by "it's not Microsoft"

    I guess what I don't get is why asian countries that were never really colonized, like China and Japan, switched so readily to metric.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @intertravel said:
    The article makes a decent case for Imperial units as a whole being designed/suitable for ease of approximation, where metric was designed/has become useful for accurate (scientific) measurement and exact calculation.

    That's pretty common-knowledge, right? Both liters and meters seem extremely inconvenient. A person shouldn't need 2 places of decimal points to roughly describe their height.

    I'd say it's more common-sense than common knowledge. (Attempted jokelet involving pedantry about hyphenation removed for failure to be funny.) I don't know if you read the article I linked to, but the point I was drawing from it is not the main point - I thought it was interesting to see more about the way in which yards make sense precisely because we don't really learn about this stuff - which would be knowledge - so much as work it out for ourselves - common-sense.

    @blakeyrat said:

    3) Metric has a huge "it's not the British system" that fueled its adoption, much like how OS X and Linux adoption is fueled primarily by "it's not Microsoft"

    I guess what I don't get is why asian countries that were never really colonized, like China and Japan, switched so readily to metric.

    You're slightly mischaracterising things there - no doubt because metric fanboys have pushed a view that never really existed - and that mischaracterisation goes a long way to explaining your lack of understanding. When the metric system was invented, the intention was not to get away from old 'British' practices, but away from old unscientific schemes of measurement which just happened to be British (and French, and so-on) in favour of standardised, accurate scientific measuring standards. They were seen as a part of the Enlightenment, just as much as growing awareness of things like human rights, or as scientific thought itself pushed out alchemy. It's only because metric became associated with Napoleon that it was opposed in England, really. Otherwise, if you're an isolated country joining the modern world, the chances are you need to change your systems of measurement to fit in - so you might as well go for the more modern-seeming metric system, particularly if industrial/scientific activity is a main driver of the change.

    Ultimately, it's an argument about whether a hammer is better than a screwdriver. Pick the right tool for the job.



  • @intertravel said:

    common-sense.
     

    Nothing so senseless as common sense.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @intertravel said:
    The article makes a decent case for Imperial units as a whole being designed/suitable for ease of approximation, where metric was designed/has become useful for accurate (scientific) measurement and exact calculation.

    That's pretty common-knowledge, right? Both liters and meters seem extremely inconvenient. A person shouldn't need 2 places of decimal points to roughly describe their height.

    But you do exactly the same in Imperial units. Some who is 1 meter and 78 centimers is 5 foot 10 inches. There is not much difference in precision between 1.85m and 5"10'
    The whole "Imperial units are closer to real life" arguments always makes me laugh. Why would 1 liter of milk not be real life?



  • @bjolling said:

    But you do exactly the same in Imperial units. Some who is 1 meter and 78 centimers is 5 foot 10 inches.

    You do realize that 1.85 has two places of decimal points, while 5'10" has zero, right? You seem to have utterly missed my point.

    @bjolling said:

    The whole "Imperial units are closer to real life" arguments always makes me laugh. Why would 1 liter of milk not be real life?

    Because cows give exactly one gallon at a time.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @bjolling said:
    But you do exactly the same in Imperial units. Some who is 1 meter and 78 centimers is 5 foot 10 inches.

    You do realize that 1.85 has two places of decimal points, while 5'10" has zero, right? You seem to have utterly missed my point.

    Nope - I answered in the spirit of your remark. When someone asks my height, I will say I'm "one meter eighty five", just like you'd say "I'm five foot ten". Nobody cares that in writing "one" and "eighty five" is separated by a dot and "five" and "ten" are separate by the ' symbol

    @blakeyrat said:

    @bjolling said:
    The whole "Imperial units are closer to real life" arguments always makes me laugh. Why would 1 liter of milk not be real life?

    Because cows give exactly one gallon at a time.

    That's strange. A healthy European cow gives exactly 30 liters a day which is about 7,92 gallons. I'd say 30 liters is more real life since 7.92 gallons uses two decimal points 🙂



  • @blakeyrat said:

    You do realize that 1.85 has two places of decimal points, while 5'10" has zero, right?
     

    In that case 185cm has no decimal points! Better to use one unit than two, especially when there are different amounts in the units (12 inches in a foot, 3 foot in a yard, 22 yards in a chain, 10 chains in a furlong, 8 furlongs in a mile, 3 miles in a league - got all that from wikipedia)

    @blakeyrat said:

    Because cows give exactly one gallon at a time.
    )

    Do cows in the UK give ~25% more milk than US cows? My biggest problem is the different amounts for the same name, depending in which country you are and what you are talking about. What is heavier, a pound of feathers or a pound of gold? The feathers of course, being 454 grams, where a pound of gold weighs 373 grams!


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