But setup ate my memory!



  • I just tried to install Ubuntu 10.4 on an old laptop (166MHz, 64MB RAM). The (text mode) installer aborted because:

    kernel: [ 1546.625217] Out of memory: kill process 17861 (debootstrap) score 74 or a child
    kernel: [ 1546.625268] Killed process 18557 (ar)
    debootstrap: zcat: error inflating
    debootstrap: tar: short read

    I guess I need more swap space. Am I TRWTF for recycling old hardware?



  • https://help.ubuntu.com/10.04/installation-guide/i386/minimum-hardware-reqts.html

    You're right on the border of having barely enough RAM and having not enough RAM. Maybe you have 64MB and the installer needs 64MiB?



  • @fatbull said:

    I just tried to install Ubuntu 10.4 on an old laptop (166MHz, 64MB RAM). The (text mode) installer aborted because:

    kernel: [ 1546.625217] Out of memory: kill process 17861 (debootstrap) score 74 or a child
    kernel: [ 1546.625268] Killed process 18557 (ar)
    debootstrap: zcat: error inflating
    debootstrap: tar: short read

    I guess I need more swap space. Am I TRWTF for recycling old hardware?

     

    Old hardware, no.  Old horses that passed their racing days 6 years ago and should've just been shot for glue by now, yes.



  •  Try another small linux distro, there are lots of them that even load a X environment.



  • @fatbull said:

    Am I TRWTF for recycling old hardware?

     

    No. But trying to do it with Ubuntu, yes you are. I am running Zenwalk (good developer environment) on a 10-year-old Thinkpad, and it works OK (for work purposes - surfing, docs, email). Mind you, it's a big brutal machine compared to yours (500 MHz and 256 MB). So try Damn Small, Crunchbang, Puppy, or MiniNo.



  •  Damn small linux requires too much memory. Last time i tried it, it wouldn't install on a 2MB RAM computer! It required at least 4MB!



  • @tchize said:

     Damn small linux requires too much memory. Last time i tried it, it wouldn't install on a 2MB RAM computer! It required at least 4MB!

    What a hog. I suppose the "damn small" part is hipsterically ironic. 640kB should be enough for every system.



  • I don't know the command to kill a process, so I guess I would have had to settle for the child sacrifice to fix this one. Thankfully, there's a school nearby.



  • @GreyWolf said:

    @fatbull said:
    Am I TRWTF for recycling old hardware?
    No. But trying to do it with Ubuntu, yes you are.

    Damn!

    The laptop has been working as a minimal web and file server since around 2004; a poor man's home NAS if you want to put it this way. It was running Debian Etch just fine until its harddisk died this week, so I thought I could install Ubuntu (server edition) instead. Perhaps I really should replace it with something new.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @fatbull said:

    The laptop has been working as a minimal web and file server since around 2004; a poor man's home NAS if you want to put it this way. It was running Debian Etch just fine until its harddisk died this week, so I thought I could install Ubuntu (server edition) instead. Perhaps I really should replace it with something new.

    Just put Debian back on it. Why the hell do you need Ubanto on a server anyway? Hell, what does someone who's been using Linux since 2004 need with Ubanto anyway?



  • @Weng said:

    Hell, what does someone who's been using Linux since 2004 need with Ubanto anyway?
     

    I've been using Linux since 1998 and use Ubuntu as my primary OS at home. More for the laziness than anything else! (It Just Works™)



  • @Kiss me I'm Polish said:

    I suppose the "damn small" part is hipsterically ironic. 640kB should be enough for every system.
     

    For that (and pre-80386 Intels), there's ELKS, but it seems to have been dead since about 2003.



  • @Zemm said:

    @Weng said:

    Hell, what does someone who's been using Linux since 2004 need with Ubanto anyway?
     

    I've been using Linux since 1998 and use Ubuntu as my primary OS at home. More for the laziness than anything else! (It Just Works™)

     

    At least for the linux user definition of "Just Works".



  • @DescentJS said:

    @Zemm said:
    I've been using Linux since 1998 and use Ubuntu as my primary OS at home. More for the laziness than anything else! (It Just Works™)
    At least for the linux user definition of "Just Works".
    I was recently seting up a dual-boot XP/Ubuntu system for my kids, and Ubuntu worked better than XP (and yes, I realise XP is quite old now so it's not a strictly fair comparison). In particular, XP couldn't see the network card, so I had to boot into Ubuntu to download the XP drivers. At the time my own system was down with a defunct power supply, otherwise I could just have used that.


    Ubuntu also got the sound card working properly straight away; I had to download and install (and figure out the weird-arse interface for) the XP drivers to get it working in XP.


    In short, the linux user definition of "Just Works" is the same as the windows user definition. It's not 2004 any more.



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    In short, the linux user definition of "Just Works" is the same as the windows user definition. It's not 2004 any more.

     

    You're right, it's not 2004 anymore. So why are you using a OS from 2002?



  • @DescentJS said:

    @Zemm said:

    @Weng said:

    Hell, what does someone who's been using Linux since 2004 need with Ubanto anyway?
     

    I've been using Linux since 1998 and use Ubuntu as my primary OS at home. More for the laziness than anything else! (It Just Works™)

     

    At least for the linux user definition of "Just Works".

     

    It's much easier than looking around warez sites for Windows. 😛 And then around other sites for the drivers.

     



  • @BC_Programmer said:

    You're right, it's not 2004 anymore. So why are you using a OS from 2002?

    Because in 2004 I was using an OS from 1998.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Scarlet Manuka said:

    I was recently seting up a dual-boot XP/Ubuntu system for my kids, and Ubuntu worked better than XP (and yes, I realise XP is quite old now so it's not a strictly fair comparison). In particular, XP couldn't see the network card, so I had to boot into Ubuntu to download the XP drivers. At the time my own system was down with a defunct power supply, otherwise I could just have used that.


    Ubuntu also got the sound card working properly straight away; I had to download and install (and figure out the weird-arse interface for) the XP drivers to get it working in XP.


    In short, the linux user definition of "Just Works" is the same as the windows user definition. It's not 2004 any more.

    I know it's fucking impossible for most people who use this particular argument to wrap their head around, but the hardware you had problems with is [b]significantly newer than XP[/b]

    It is also significantly OLDER than the current release of Ubuntu.

    Driver authors cannot predict the future. Service packs do not include drivers because they would be insanely huge to virtually no benefit.Now, if you'd compared Windows 7 and a current Ubuntu release, you'd find that for all reasonable consumer configurations, both of them have identical hardware compatability (except for the dozens of correct-but-obscure configurations Linux does not properly support no matter the flavor)



  • Did you miss the bit of my post where I said "yes, I realise XP is quite old now"?


    I didn't expect XP to predict the future. I wasn't surprised that I needed to download some drivers (it's just a pain when it's the network card drivers you need to download). My point wasn't really about XP at all.

    My point was in fact the same point you're making: that both Linux and Windows "Just Work" on pretty much any normal hardware configuration, and that people like [b]DescentJS[/b] who think that the Linux user experience usually involves hardware issues need to stop living in the past. I probably did not make this explicit enough in my earlier post; sorry.



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    My point was in fact the same point you're making: that both Linux and Windows "Just Work" on pretty much any normal hardware configuration, and that people like DescentJS who think that the Linux user experience usually involves hardware issues need to stop living in the past.

    The problem is, we've all had hardware issues in Linux like LAST YEAR.

    The secondary problem is, if you grill Linux users who claim to have no hardware problems, it usually turns out they do but they've worked around them. (Maybe even not consciously.) Fictional conversation:

    Me: "So I tried Ubuntu on my HP1000tx tablet PC, and it doesn't work at all."
    Lunix: "Weird! I have the same box and it works fine!"
    Me: "What did you do to get sleep mode working?"
    Lunix: "Oh. I just don't use sleep mode, because it'll crash when you try to wake it."
    Me: "Ok. What did you do to get the volume keys and CD/DVD controls on the keyboard working?"
    Lunix: "I never use those."
    Me: "Oook, how do you get it to recognize a projector plugged into the VGA port? It doesn't seem to work without a reboot..."
    Lunix: "Who uses a tablet PC to do presentations? I sure don't!"
    Me: "Sigh. Fine. How did you get the touchscreen working? I'd like to use handwriting input like I did in Vista."
    Lunix: "Oh I just use it as a laptop."

    Linux users are like PC gamers: they're definition of "everything works" is hilarious different from everybody else's definition.

    And now, apropos of nothing, here's a weird bug I found in Chrome today.


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