Apparently Opera/TDWTF Have No Style?



  • Was browsing during some downtime yesterday and came across this:





  • It's a duplicate attribute, there's a style at the start of the tag too.



  •  So you can't have the same attribute twice on an XML element. That's not a WTF.



  • The WTF lies in the fact that it's never happened before, despite visiting many pages that break the rule. Hell, I'm even guilty of this occasionally when testing pages before publishing them, that's why I always run through a validator or something, but I've never had Opera just up and refuse to display the page altogether, it's just ignored it in the past. Maybe it's something they've recently added/updated, but either way I don't have any special settings and a normal user would WTF at that, so it's a WTF on Opera's part for not just hiding it or something.



  • @Valarnin said:

    The WTF lies in the fact that it's never happened before, despite visiting many pages that break the rule. Hell, I'm even guilty of this occasionally when testing pages before publishing them, that's why I always run through a validator or something, but I've never had Opera just up and refuse to display the page altogether, it's just ignored it in the past. Maybe it's something they've recently added/updated, but either way I don't have any special settings and a normal user would WTF at that, so it's a WTF on Opera's part for not just hiding it or something.

    Both Opera & Firefox throw that error if page is served as application/xhtml+xml or text/xml. That enables "strict" XHTML mode (page has to be well-formed XML, period), text/html ignores some parse errors. IE8 will ask user to save the file with application/xhtml+xml and with applicaction/xml, it actually simply starts eating 100% of CPU (or well, 25% with dual core + HT)...expect if you have already visited the page when it was in text/html mode. Then it simply parses page like HTML.



  • Opera shows this message when the server serves the page with a content type of application/xhtml+xml, but not when it serves the page with a content type of text/html

    since old IEs won't render application/xhtml+xml at all, it is not used a lot, and you won't see this message often.

    [edit: was too slow. ignore this post...]



  • @Buzer said:

    @Valarnin said:
    The WTF lies in the fact that it's never happened before, despite visiting many pages that break the rule. Hell, I'm even guilty of this occasionally when testing pages before publishing them, that's why I always run through a validator or something, but I've never had Opera just up and refuse to display the page altogether, it's just ignored it in the past. Maybe it's something they've recently added/updated, but either way I don't have any special settings and a normal user would WTF at that, so it's a WTF on Opera's part for not just hiding it or something.

    Both Opera & Firefox throw that error if page is served as application/xhtml+xml or text/xml. That enables "strict" XHTML mode (page has to be well-formed XML, period), text/html ignores some parse errors. IE8 will ask user to save the file with application/xhtml+xml and with applicaction/xml, it actually simply starts eating 100% of CPU (or well, 25% with dual core + HT)...expect if you have already visited the page when it was in text/html mode. Then it simply parses page like HTML.



    Ahh, thanks for the info. I take it TDWTF recent switched over their content-type header?

  • Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election

    That's actually one of the most intelligible error messages I've ever seen. It tells you what happened (XML parsing failed), why (well-formedness constraint; unique attribute definition), where (style="padding:5px;"), what specification it's following (http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-xml/#uniquattspec), and offers you the option to load the page anyway (Reparse document as HTML).



  • @joe.edwards said:

    That's actually one of the most intelligible error messages I've ever seen. It tells you what happened (XML parsing failed), why (well-formedness constraint; unique attribute definition), where (style="padding:5px;"), what specification it's following (http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-xml/#uniquattspec), and offers you the option to load the page anyway (Reparse document as HTML).





    One of the many reasons I love Opera, however is it really something to display to an end-user? If your average Joe Schmoe was browsing and saw that, what would they do?



    ===EDIT===



    Perhaps a setting in View>Developer Tools, or just log it to the error console?



    On a side note, Opera's Error Console shows 18 CSS warnings and 33 CSS errors for this page.



  • @Valarnin said:

    Filed under: We have assumed control., Attention all planets of the Solar Federation, We have assumed control.., We have assumed control...
     

    I saw them in concert last year and it was probably the best concert I've ever been to.



  • @Valarnin said:

    Ahh, thanks for the info. I take it TDWTF recent switched over their content-type header?

    They may have changed it as a test at some point as currently the page is served as text/html. I don't remember ever getting that error on TDWTF (or any non-test/-development page)

    @Valarnin said:
    One of the many reasons I love Opera, however is it really something to display to an end-user? If your average Joe Schmoe was browsing and saw that, what would they do?

    ===EDIT===

    Perhaps a setting in View>Developer Tools, or just log it to the error console?

    The reason why it's done like that is most likely so that developer is pretty much forced to fix it (as good portion of the users will keep getting the error message (=at least FF & Opera, I haven't tested IE9, Chrome & Safari)) and one day maybe a good majority of relevant websites are finally XML compatible.

    Also, the developer has to specifically serve page with non-default (I don't think it's default on any language/webserver?) content type, so they are likely to understand what it actually means.



  • @Buzer said:

    and one day maybe a good majority of relevant websites are finally XML compatible.

    That will never happen. Nor should it.


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