Eat your own dogfood first...



  • Every so often, I recieve emails from a company called Sitemorse. You can pay them to run checks on your website to make sure it's accessibility-compliant, HTML-standards correct, no missing links, grammatically correct, and all spelled (spelt?) correctly. The quote below is from their latest marketing email... I've highlighted the spelling and grammar mistakes (at least, those I can see myself!)...

    Rather than spending £35,000 twittering, perhaps Lincolnshire should focused on sorting out the complaince, quality and finctionality of thier own site as it was the greatest faller, dropping 254 places, scoring 3.77.

    Perhaps they should run their product on their own literature first before slagging other people off!!



  • @MeesterTurner said:

    Perhaps they should focused on running their prodict on thier own literature first before slagging other poeple off!!

    FTFY.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @MeesterTurner said:

    Perhaps they should run their product on their own literature first before slagging other people off!!
    I find it mildly amusing to search Google for the companies sending me the occasional SEO spam I get, to see how the companies themselves rank.



    It should come as no surprise to anyone here that the results are usually abysmal.



  • @PJH said:

    It should come as no surprise to anyone here that the results are usually abysmal.
    That's because their scams work by getting high ranks for keywords nobody ever searches for. If you search for "genethliacon" (random archaic word I found in a dictionary), the SEO company sites will turn up.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @TarquinWJ said:

    @PJH said:
    It should come as no surprise to anyone here that the results are usually abysmal.
    That's because their scams work by getting high ranks for keywords nobody ever searches for. If you search for "genethliacon" (random archaic word I found in a dictionary), the SEO company sites will turn up.
    Not quite what I meant. The searches I made were usually for the name of the company being spammed (or the domain name of the purported email sender if it wasn't gmail.com,) and the company concerned rarely came top (or even top-10) of those searches.



  • @PJH said:

    The searches I made were usually for the name of the company being spammed (or the domain name of the purported email sender if it wasn't gmail.com,)
    That will never work. They can't optimise for proper words like their own company name, or products they sell. They can only optimise for "genethliacon". Surely you want their help so that your site comes up when someone searches google for "genethliacon" ... right? Right?



  • Pretty sure they made up the word "twittering." What's wrong with "spending £35,000 on Twitter?"



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Pretty sure they made up the word "twittering."

    Pretty sure they didn't. The verb 'to twitter' is older than either of us. What do you think twitter.com got its name from?

    What's wrong with "spending £35,000 on Twitter?"

    Everything? Oh, you meant grammatically? Nothing, I think.



  • @Ilya Ehrenburg said:

    Pretty sure they didn't. The verb 'to twitter' is older than either of us. What do you think twitter.com got its name from?

    Since I've never in my entire life heard the verb "to twitter" in a context other than twitter.com, I assumed they made-up the name.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Since I've never in my entire life heard the verb "to twitter" in a context other than twitter.com, I assumed they made-up the name.
     

    Maybe the word is uncommon in the USA, nevertheless:

    You've never read a book where twittering birds were mentioned? Strange.



  • @Ilya Ehrenburg said:

    You've never read a book where twittering birds were mentioned? Strange.

    No. But dozens with "tweeting" birds.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Ilya Ehrenburg said:
    You've never read a book where twittering birds were mentioned? Strange.

    No. But dozens with "tweeting" birds.


    Really? The verb 'to twitter' is certainly in American dictionaries, e.g. American Heritage.



  • @Cad Delworth said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    @Ilya Ehrenburg said:
    You've never read a book where twittering birds were mentioned? Strange.

    No. But dozens with "tweeting" birds.


    Really? The verb 'to twitter' is certainly in American dictionaries, e.g. American Heritage.

    There's a lot of words in American dictionaries I've never actually heard or seen. There's probably a lot of words in British dictionaries you've never heard or seen.

    So... what's your point?

    If you're trying to position me as some kind of dumb ignorant hick because I hadn't encountered "twitter" before, then ok: I'm a dumb ignorant hick. Do you feel better?



  •  I can't speak for Cad, but I'm just surprised that you've never encountered such an everyday word.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Ilya Ehrenburg said:
    You've never read a book where twittering birds were mentioned? Strange.

    No. But dozens with "tweeting" birds.

     

    I thought that a message sent/posted/whatever through Twitter was known as a "tweet".

    I'm not a Twitter user myself (as it's not available on cassette) so I could be wrong.



  • @RTapeLoadingError said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    @Ilya Ehrenburg said:
    You've never read a book where twittering birds were mentioned? Strange.

    No. But dozens with "tweeting" birds.

     

    I thought that a message sent/posted/whatever through Twitter was known as a "tweet".

    It is. So is the sound birds make. Unless you're Cad Delworth.



  •  I don't know, I've encountered it in books and newspapers before.  Perhaps different generations of writers?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @RTapeLoadingError said:

    I thought that a message sent/posted/whatever through Twitter was known as a "tweet".
    The past tense of "tweet" is "twat"



  • @Weng said:

    The past tense of "tweet" is "twat"

     

    +1 Internets to you, good sir!



  • @Ilya Ehrenburg said:

    @Weng said:

    The past tense of "tweet" is "twat"

     

    +1 Internets to you, good sir!

    This is one of those times where I wish the site had a thumbs up button for posts. I've given the topic its five stars instead.



  • @Weng said:

    @RTapeLoadingError said:

    I thought that a message sent/posted/whatever through Twitter was known as a "tweet".
    The past tense of "tweet" is "twat"

    I thought "twat" was "a person who tweets".

     

     


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