Who cares what they call it.



  • The table name is Hungarian, so perfectly normal. The column names are.. well...

    sp_help Tértivevény

    Column_name Type Computed Length
    TértivevényID int no 4
    DocumentID int no 4
    36921,504949537 varchar no 50
    25955.5 bit no 1
    15493.3 datetime no 8
    3537.83 int no 4
    29314.7 int no 4
    10644.3 varchar no 255
    22616.4 datetime no 8
    5776.03 datetime no 8
    RagszamComputed varchar yes 10

    there are a couple of other similar tables and the data contained is perfectly normal and I'd have thought easy to give a decent column name to...



  • Wow! Why do people DO that? I WTF'd out loud when I saw this.



  • I didn't even know those were legal column names. What the bloody hell. That's even worse than the Int1, Int2, Varchar1 and DateTime1 columns that I encounter more often than I should.



  • ???   Did the data dictionary catch fire or something?  What database is this?



  • I just like the word "Ragszam"



  • @toth said:

    That's even worse than the Int1
    But with these, you get something even cooler; a column with a double for a name that can only hold an integer. There's something poetic in that.



  • I would bet those column names actually represent something - policy numbers or sections of the by-laws. I've seen that used before. The other possibility is that it's been through an obfuscating tool of some kind. This is interesting, but I don't think it's as much of a WTF as Column1, column2, etc... which is what I what expect to see, even in Hungarian, if these column names were simply random. I'd love to know more about this and how it got to be this way. There's a story behind this one.



  • Iain,

    I think you are in the running for best first post.

    I like Ragszam.  With ketchup. 



  • @TarquinWJ said:

    @toth said:
    That's even worse than the Int1
    But with these, you get something even cooler; a column with a double for a name that can only hold an integer. There's something poetic in that.

    The column is just being humble. It could store a double, but it doesn't want to show off.



  • @jasmine2501 said:

    The other possibility is that it's been through an obfuscating tool of some kind.

    Which is why they left "DocumentID" readable.

    No, my guess is somebody started typing in column names and values in SQL Server, thinking it would work like Excel, then got confused and left it that way.



  •  I don't think that's the right way to do Hungarian Notation.



  • @DCRoss said:

     I don't think that's the right way to do Hungarian Notation.

     

    How did it take ten posts before someone made this joke?



  • For anyone interested, the table name (in English) is 'Return Receipt,' according to Mr and Mrs Google's translation tools.



  • @Cad Delworth said:

    For anyone interested, the table name (in English) is 'Return Receipt,' according to Mr and Mrs Google's translation tools.
     

    Unfortunately, the same tools tell us that "Ragszam" just means..."Ragszam".



  • Google suggests "Rasizam" for "Ragzsam"; "Rasizam" translates to "Racism" in Croatian...



  • "Rag szám" translates to "suffix number". "Rag" on its own translates to "affix".



  • @dabean said:

    "Rag szám" translates to "suffix number". "Rag" on its own translates to "affix".
     

    Then if they're gonna camelcase it, it should have been "RagSzam", not "Ragszam".

    Guy I worked with once got a spec written entirely in Portuguese.  Fortunately it was mostly tables of numbers and data-types, so he didn't really need to understand what the words meant, except that one column, whose values were small integers, was headed "Tam".

    Got out a Portuguese-English dictionary and couldn't find a word "Tam", but the closest thing alphabetically was "tamanduá", which was the Portuguese word for "anteater".  Local running joke became "what's the anteater of the user-defined data?"

     



  • @da Doctah said:

    Guy I worked with once got a spec written entirely in Portuguese.  Fortunately it was mostly tables of numbers and data-types, so he didn't really need to understand what the words meant, except that one column, whose values were small integers, was headed "Tam".

    Got out a Portuguese-English dictionary and couldn't find a word "Tam", but the closest thing alphabetically was "tamanduá", which was the Portuguese word for "anteater".  Local running joke became "what's the anteater of the user-defined data?"

    I'd say it was probably Tamanho, size.



  • @Zecc said:

    I'd say it was probably Tamanho, size.


    You think?
    @da Doctah said:
    Filed under: For those waiting for the other shoe to drop, "tam" is short for "tamanho" (size)



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    @Zecc said:
    I'd say it was probably Tamanho, size.

    You think?
    @da Doctah said:
    Filed under: For those waiting for the other shoe to drop, "tam" is short for "tamanho" (size)
    I'll wait for Alex to delete all the tags again, and then deny everything.



  • @Zecc said:

    @Scarlet Manuka said:

    @Zecc said:
    I'd say it was probably Tamanho, size.

    You think?
    @da Doctah said:
    Filed under: For those waiting for the other shoe to drop, "tam" is short for "tamanho" (size)
    I'll wait for Alex to delete all the tags again, and then deny everything.

    He shouldn't just delete the tags. But he should replace them all with <tag deleted> so that people reading this thread in the near future know that something was there



  • @da Doctah said:

    @dabean said:

    "Rag szám" translates to "suffix number". "Rag" on its own translates to "affix".
     

    Then if they're gonna camelcase it, it should have been "RagSzam", not "Ragszam".

    I think the lack of camel casing is the least of their problems.



  • @The_Assimilator said:

    @da Doctah said:

    @dabean said:

    "Rag szám" translates to "suffix number". "Rag" on its own translates to "affix".
     

    Then if they're gonna camelcase it, it should have been "RagSzam", not "Ragszam".

    I think the lack of camel casing is the least of their problems.

    36921,504949537 is clearly CamelCased.


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