Lynn-Queue



  • So our resident PMP came to me this afternoon to suggest that the project I'm working on could benefit from some 'Lynn-Queue'. When I gave him the standard 'WTF are you talking about?' look, he went so far as to tell me that, as a developer, I really should be up to speed on 'Lynn-Queue' at this point and that he's going to recommend to my boss that I get some training.




    Turns out he read about LINQ in a magazine and decided that we needed some, without knowing (caring?) where it was used or why. Idiot. I'm pretty sure I read a Dilbert once regarding the dangers of management types getting their hands on trade magazines.



  • Reminds me of a middle-management loon at my last job who consistently referred to the .NET Framework as "www.microsoft.net".

    A little learning is a dangerous thing.



  •  Would have been funnier if you were a Java shop :)



  • @Someone You Know said:

    Reminds me of a middle-management loon at my last job who consistently referred to the .NET Framework as "www.microsoft.net".
     

    You know, when I get stuff like that, I mail 'em back and say that it's .Net, with a two sentence explanation.

    It works, you know. I got a total interwep n00b who was in sales here to understand the basics of lol, lolz, lal, lals, -z0r and zomg.

     

    And then there's the guy who refers to underscore as underscure because apparently he can't handle more than one class of vowel in a word. He's very competent, so I let him get away with it.



  •  Just add "using System.Linq;" and tell him you're already using it. 

    What's a PMP?





  •  Did you, with a straight face, ask what colour LINQ you should use?



  • @Zecc said:

    @DOA said:
    What's a PMP?
    Someone who procures customers for whores?
    A project manager? Sheesh, just say project manager. Everyone's a "Professional" there days.



  • @DOA said:

    A project manager? Sheesh, just say project manager. Everyone's a "Professional" there days.
     

    A project manager penis.



  • @DOA said:

    @Zecc said:

    @DOA said:
    What's a PMP?
    Someone who procures customers for whores?
    A project manager? Sheesh, just say project manager. Everyone's a "Professional" there days.

    Sorry, referring to him as PMP was a feeble attempt at irony, since the 'professional' was challenging my level of dev skill because I don't know about 'lynn-queue'. Also, his email signature and even the nameplate on his cube say PMP. I think he's compensating for something.



  • @DOA said:

    A project manager? Sheesh, just say project manager. Everyone's a "Professional" there days.
    Except that they have an association and exams and everything just like a big boy's qualification.



  • @Smitty said:

    So our resident PMP came to me this afternoon to suggest that the project I'm working on could benefit from some 'Lynn-Queue'. When I gave him the standard 'WTF are you talking about?' look, he went so far as to tell me that, as a developer, I really should be up to speed on 'Lynn-Queue' at this point and that he's going to recommend to my boss that I get some training.

    Turns out he read about LINQ in a magazine and decided that we needed some, without knowing (caring?) where it was used or why. Idiot. I'm pretty sure I read a Dilbert once regarding the dangers of management types getting their hands on trade magazines.

    Argh.  I do things like that all the time -- pronouncing words/acronyms incorrectly.  For me it's because I've only seen them in print and never actually heard them.  Usually, when corrected I simply slap myself in the forehead and expound on my level of idiocy or ignorance and keep using my own idiosyncratic pronunciation.

    Linux --- I pronounce Line - Uhx, when I have been repeatedly told it's pronounced lihn - ucks.
    SQL --- I pronounce Sequel  when I've been told over and over it should be  essque-el.

    Oracle --- I pronounce "Lousy Pile of Crap, lame excuse for a database thats constantly crashing and slowing to a crawl for no apparent reason ont which we apply increasing numbers of patches and hotfixes that introduce even worse issues".

    Oh, that last one might actually be correct.



  • @Medezark said:

    SQL --- I pronounce Sequel  when I've been told over and over it should be  essque-el.

    A friend of mine pronounces it (tongue-in-cheek) as "Squirrel"

    But what bugs me most is the differences between the pronouncing of US English and the correct way of doing it. USians have a tendency to emphasize the wrong syllable. So for example "details" becomes "d-Tails" rather than "DE-tails".

    Of course it bugs me even more when they muck up foreign words (especially proper names). I was watching TV last night and was cringing at them saying "Bell-em" when the name of the city is "Belém" which has the emphasis on the accented syllable.



  • @dhromed said:

    @Someone You Know said:

    Reminds me of a middle-management loon at my last job who consistently referred to the .NET Framework as "www.microsoft.net".
     

    You know, when I get stuff like that, I mail 'em back and say that it's .Net, with a two sentence explanation.

    It works, you know.

     

    Not in this case. Believe me, it was attempted on more than one occasion.



  • @BillC said:

     Did you, with a straight face, ask what colour LINQ you should use?

     

    [url=http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/1995-11-17/]I think Mauve has the most RAM.[/url]

    (with apologies to Scott Adams)



  • @OzPeter said:

    @Medezark said:
    SQL --- I pronounce Sequel  when I've been told over and over it should be  essque-el.

    A friend of mine pronounces it (tongue-in-cheek) as "Squirrel"

    Since the language is based on SEQUEL, I say calling it sequel is just fine.

    Back when my company was actually fun, and not soul-killing, we went a few months calling SQL "Squirrel." I mean, hell, why not?

    @OzPeter said:

    But what bugs me most is the differences between the pronouncing of US English and the correct way of doing it. USians have a tendency to emphasize the wrong syllable. So for example "details" becomes "d-Tails" rather than "DE-tails".

    Just an FYI, the US is a freakin' LARGE country. We have many, many different accents. I'm in the US, and I've rarely heard "d-Tails." Is that a Texan thing? Or an East Coast thing?

    @OzPeter said:

    Of course it bugs me even more when they muck up foreign words (especially proper names). I was watching TV last night and was cringing at them saying "Bell-em" when the name of the city is "Belém" which has the emphasis on the accented syllable.

    Yah. When Frasier was on the air, set in "Seattle", they mispronounced so many Washington State city names and generally got the geography so freakin' wrong. I remember one episode when he took a call from "ya-KI-ma":

    1) The name of the city of "YAK-ima."

    2) There's no way in hell a radio station in Seattle can reach Yakima without being syndicated. There's this thing called the "Cascade Mountain Range", idiot Hollywood writer, maybe you should look at a freakin' map!

    Also, Twilight takes place in Forks because Stephanie Meyer looked up which town in the continental US had the highest average rainfall, assuming that high rainfall meant constant cloud cover. The Olympic Peninsula, where Forks is located, is a rain forest. It's sunny half the year, and pissing down the other half. You find more consistent cloud cover if you'd gone east to any of the towns at the base of the Cascades, there are towns there that have to refer to a photo to remember what the sun looks like.

    I mean, don't get me wrong: Forks is a fine town and a great place to set a story, and they can use the tourist income, but holy Christ Stephanie Meyer, you fail geography forever.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Christ Stephanie Meyer, you fail
     

    http://theoatmeal.com/story/twilight



  •  @blakeyrat said:

    Nationalist trolling myself

    And also showing a disturbing level of knowledge regarding twilight.



  • @dhromed said:

    And then there's the guy who refers to underscore as underscure because apparently he can't handle more than one class of vowel in a word. He's very competent, so I let him get away with it.

     

    Last place I worked it was "underbar".



  • Knowing what city the book is set in, when he apparently lives in the area, constitutes a disturbing level of knowledge about the books?  I'm from the Seattle area too, and trust me, it's just about impossible to have not picked up at least that much via simple cultural osmosis.  Especially since the movies started coming out.



  • @Mason Wheeler said:

    Knowing what city the book is set in, when he apparently lives in the area, constitutes a disturbing level of knowledge about the books?  I'm from the Seattle area too, and trust me, it's just about impossible to have not picked up at least that much via simple cultural osmosis.  Especially since the movies started coming out.
     

    Fair enough.  I suppose I've picked up weird things with no interest in them because of where I've lived too.



  • @Smitty said:

    Turns out he read about LINQ in a magazine and decided that we needed some, without knowing (caring?) where it was used or why. Idiot. I'm pretty sure I read a Dilbert once regarding the dangers of management types getting their hands on trade magazines.

    I agree it is utterly stupid to suggest something should be used without fully understanding its use (imagine telling a construction contractor he should be using "tapcons" out of the blue.. you'd get laughed at). But that contractor should know what tapcons are and when the correct time to use them is.

    If you are using .net (>2.0) you should know about LINQ (and lambda expressions, which work targeting 2.0 if you are using VS2008). The language integrated query can make source much easier to read. I don't do much DB work these days (ergo I don't use linq to sql) but I do use linq to object and linq to xml and find it much easier to write, read and maintain than equivalent code not using linq (especially if you are familiar with sql). We're moving a project from 2.0 to 3.5 so we can use LINQ.



  • @Smitty said:

    Sorry, referring to him as PMP was a feeble attempt at irony, since the 'professional' was challenging my level of dev skill because I don't know about 'lynn-queue'. Also, his email signature and even the nameplate on his cube say PMP. I think he's compensating for something.

    You see, a PMP's love is very different from that of a square.

     



  • You know what annoys me most? When people refer to INI files as "innies". Sounds so childish and tame for what is actually usually where the deepest, darkest secrets of applications are kept.



  • @Smitty said:

    @DOA said:

    @Zecc said:

    @DOA said:
    What's a PMP?
    Someone who procures customers for whores?
    A project manager? Sheesh, just say project manager. Everyone's a "Professional" there days.

    Sorry, referring to him as PMP was a feeble attempt at irony, since the 'professional' was challenging my level of dev skill because I don't know about 'lynn-queue'. Also, his email signature and even the nameplate on his cube say PMP. I think he's compensating for something.

     

    Pretty sure PMPs are required to list all obtained certifications after their name, for some strange reason.

    Also, everybody I know pronounces it "Sequel."  I haven't heard "Ess Queue Ell" since college.



  • @dubbreak said:

    @Smitty said:
    Turns out he read about LINQ in a magazine and decided that we needed some, without knowing (caring?) where it was used or why. Idiot. I'm pretty sure I read a Dilbert once regarding the dangers of management types getting their hands on trade magazines.

    I agree it is utterly stupid to suggest something should be used without fully understanding its use (imagine telling a construction contractor he should be using "tapcons" out of the blue.. you'd get laughed at). But that contractor should know what tapcons are and when the correct time to use them is.

    If you are using .net (>2.0) you should know about LINQ (and lambda expressions, which work targeting 2.0 if you are using VS2008). The language integrated query can make source much easier to read. I don't do much DB work these days (ergo I don't use linq to sql) but I do use linq to object and linq to xml and find it much easier to write, read and maintain than equivalent code not using linq (especially if you are familiar with sql). We're moving a project from 2.0 to 3.5 so we can use LINQ.

    Is my sarcasm detector failing me completely? The point of the story was not my knowledge of LINQ (and I have a little), but that the PMP is a tool and randomly decided that we needed some 'lynn-queue' simply because it's new and exciting.



  • @ubersoldat said:

     Would have been funnier if you were a Java shop :)

    Was waiting, nay hoping for that other shoe to drop...

    a shame for that would have been HAAAlarious



  • You should also add some xml and a 4 tier layered logic to your app to make it more enterprisey.

    Buzzwords do a lot of damage, next thing he will tell you that they should support cloud computing taking your business to the next level.



  • @nexekho said:

    You know what annoys me most? When people refer to INI files as "innies". Sounds so childish and tame for what is actually usually where the deepest, darkest secrets of applications are kept.
     

    Look, maybe where you're from, vaginas with very small inner labia are a secret taboo, really hush-hush; but I suggest you finally go get your virgin ass some well-deserved nookie.



  • Do I really have to be the one to make a joke about Lynn-Queue being a great addition to C-Pound?



  • And here I was thinking "innies" referred to belly buttons, not vaginas...



  • @topspin said:

    And here I was thinking "innies" referred to belly buttons, not vaginas...

     

    Both.



  • @Smitty said:

    Is my sarcasm detector failing me completely? The point of the story was not my knowledge of LINQ (and I have a little), but that the PMP is a tool and randomly decided that we needed some 'lynn-queue' simply because it's new and exciting.

    Yeah, that was the "point".. but if you have no idea what LINQ is, a PMP is the first one bringing it to your attention and you discarding it just because it came from a PMP.. well that would be TRWTF. Yeah "You should use technology X" is dumb, but bringing up stuff "new stuff" isn't dumb.. it's them trying to be helpful or trying to start small talk.

    I had the ceo of the company ask me about moving to android as a platform for our embedded system because he saw it at a trade show. Big wtf.. there is no point at moving OSes for our stand-alone device, but he just wanted to chat and look like he had some knowledge and insight into what's going on in our sector and check-up to see if I was up-to-speed on what's going on. If some technology has bubbled up to his level and I haven't heard about it, then I'm falling behind.

    Of course catch me or another dev on the wrong day and your situation would have been along the lines of:


    PMPtard: "Project X could benefit from some lynn-queue"

    dev: "Sorry lynn-queue? do you mean link?"

    PMP: "No I mean LYNN QUEUE.. you should really know about this!"

    dev: "You mean language integrated query, spelled L-I-N-Q and pronounced link? Want me to show you the wiki article?"

    PMP: "You say tomayto I say tomahto.. anyhow YES the language integration thing, we need to get on this new technology!"

    dev: "What makes you think we don't use it? Have you looked at the code base? Do you even know what the applications of linq are? What makes you think it should be used on this project IF we aren't using it."

    PMP: "Well you should be using it."

    dev: "Go back to your gantt charts. Some of us have real work to do."



  • Please don't show me an outtie.



  • @dubbreak said:

    Of course catch me or another dev on the wrong day and your situation would have been along the lines of:


    PMPtard: "Project X could benefit from some lynn-queue"

    dev: "Sorry lynn-queue? do you mean link?"

    PMP: "No I mean LYNN QUEUE.. you should really know about this!"

    dev: "You mean language integrated query, spelled L-I-N-Q and pronounced link? Want me to show you the wiki article?"

    PMP: "You say tomayto I say tomahto.. anyhow YES the language integration thing, we need to get on this new technology!"

    dev: "What makes you think we don't use it? Have you looked at the code base? Do you even know what the applications of linq are? What makes you think it should be used on this project IF we aren't using it."

    PMP: "Well you should be using it."

    dev: "Go back to your gantt charts. Some of us have real work to do."

    PMPtard now has a permanent place in my work-bashing vocabulary. Thanks for that. Also, the exchange described above is pretty close to the truth, though the less-than-PC parts were in my head. This guy was a COBOL programmer in the 80s and is currently trying to simultaneously learn VB and convince us of its superiority over C#, which means his technical recommendations are immediately suspect.




    Also, fuck CS for double backspacing when I only press the key once. In fact, fuck CS all around.



  • @Medezark said:

    @Smitty said:

    So our resident PMP came to me this afternoon to suggest that the project I'm working on could benefit from some 'Lynn-Queue'. When I gave him the standard 'WTF are you talking about?' look, he went so far as to tell me that, as a developer, I really should be up to speed on 'Lynn-Queue' at this point and that he's going to recommend to my boss that I get some training.

    Turns out he read about LINQ in a magazine and decided that we needed some, without knowing (caring?) where it was used or why. Idiot. I'm pretty sure I read a Dilbert once regarding the dangers of management types getting their hands on trade magazines.

    Argh.  I do things like that all the time -- pronouncing words/acronyms incorrectly.  For me it's because I've only seen them in print and never actually heard them.  Usually, when corrected I simply slap myself in the forehead and expound on my level of idiocy or ignorance and keep using my own idiosyncratic pronunciation.

    Linux --- I pronounce Line - Uhx, when I have been repeatedly told it's pronounced lihn - ucks.
    SQL --- I pronounce Sequel  when I've been told over and over it should be  essque-el.

    Oracle --- I pronounce "Lousy Pile of Crap, lame excuse for a database thats constantly crashing and slowing to a crawl for no apparent reason ont which we apply increasing numbers of patches and hotfixes that introduce even worse issues".

    Oh, that last one might actually be correct.

     

     

    "sequel" is a perfectly fine pronounciation. And I should know. I'm a DBA. I mean.. a PROFESSIONAL DBA. Respect my authoritah!

     

    And Oracle is actually  pronounced "Lousy Steaming Pile of Crap, lame excuse for a database thats constantly crashing and slowing to a crawl for no apparent reason ont which we apply increasing numbers of patches and hotfixes that introduce even worse issues".



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @OzPeter said:
    @Medezark said:
    SQL --- I pronounce Sequel  when I've been told over and over it should be  essque-el.

    A friend of mine pronounces it (tongue-in-cheek) as "Squirrel"

    Since the language is based on SEQUEL, I say calling it sequel is just fine.

    I bet you can SQL like a pig, boy!



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @OzPeter said:
    @Medezark said:
    SQL --- I pronounce Sequel  when I've been told over and over it should be  essque-el.

    A friend of mine pronounces it (tongue-in-cheek) as "Squirrel"

    Since the language is based on SEQUEL, I say calling it sequel is just fine.

    Since C is based on B I say calling it B is just fine.

    Since VB.NET is based on VB I say calling it VB is just fine.

    Since VB is based on QuickBASIC I say calling it QuickBASIC is just fine.

    Since a calculator is based on an abacus I say calling it an abacus is just fine.



    I'm going to have to disagree.



  • @Medezark said:

    SQL --- I pronounce Sequel  when I've been told over and over it should be  essque-el.

    Seriously? Who pronounces it "ess cue ell"? I've always pronounced it "Sequel".

    Of course, I have been known to call ASP "ahsp", like the snake.



  • @toth said:

    Seriously? Who pronounces it "ess cue ell"? I've always pronounced it "Sequel".

    I do, and so does pretty much everyone I know.

    Then again, I'm in another country. I also pronounce C#, Cê Sharp (it's Portuglish)



  • Yeah, "ess que el" is just a pain to say.

    What I find amusing is the local way of saying abbreviations. in this language, letters don't have names, they just have the sound. So PHP becomes "pa ha pa".

    Speaking of American pronunciation: The name of the metallic element Al has 2 'i' in it. Quit dropping the last one!

    And finally, it's quite random that innies and outies came up today, I'd never heard of the non-belly-button meaning until yesterday, when I stumbled across the idea of labiaplasty. Something is seriously wrong with that!



  • @Mel said:

    in this language, letters don't have names
     

    What Amazon tribe language is that?

    @Mel said:

    Yeah, "ess que el" is just a pain to say.

    Don't be silly. It's no more a pain than 'sequel'.

    @Mel said:

    I stumbled across the idea of labiaplasty. Something is seriously wrong with that!

    Some girls have roast beef.

     



  • @Smitty said:

    @dubbreak said:
    Of course catch me or another dev on the wrong day and your situation would have been along the lines of:

    PMPtard: "Project X could benefit from some lynn-queue"
    dev: "Sorry lynn-queue? do you mean link?"
    PMP: "No I mean LYNN QUEUE.. you should really know about this!"
    dev: "You mean language integrated query, spelled L-I-N-Q and pronounced link? Want me to show you the wiki article?"
    PMP: "You say tomayto I say tomahto.. anyhow YES the language integration thing, we need to get on this new technology!"
    dev: "What makes you think we don't use it? Have you looked at the code base? Do you even know what the applications of linq are? What makes you think it should be used on this project IF we aren't using it."
    PMP: "Well you should be using it."
    dev: "Go back to your gantt charts. Some of us have real work to do."
    PMPtard now has a permanent place in my work-bashing vocabulary. Thanks for that. Also, the exchange described above is pretty close to the truth, though the less-than-PC parts were in my head. This guy was a COBOL programmer in the 80s and is currently trying to simultaneously learn VB and convince us of its superiority over C#, which means his technical recommendations are immediately suspect.

    Also, fuck CS for double backspacing when I only press the key once. In fact, fuck CS all around.

    Yes, i would be suspect of his suggestions as well, considering there is no advantage of one language over the other now that they both target the same CLR.   Except VB doesn't have all the fancy code decorations.



  • @Medezark said:

    @Smitty said:

    @dubbreak said:
    Of course catch me or another dev on the wrong day and your situation would have been along the lines of:

    PMPtard: "Project X could benefit from some lynn-queue"
    dev: "Sorry lynn-queue? do you mean link?"
    PMP: "No I mean LYNN QUEUE.. you should really know about this!"
    dev: "You mean language integrated query, spelled L-I-N-Q and pronounced link? Want me to show you the wiki article?"
    PMP: "You say tomayto I say tomahto.. anyhow YES the language integration thing, we need to get on this new technology!"
    dev: "What makes you think we don't use it? Have you looked at the code base? Do you even know what the applications of linq are? What makes you think it should be used on this project IF we aren't using it."
    PMP: "Well you should be using it."
    dev: "Go back to your gantt charts. Some of us have real work to do."
    PMPtard now has a permanent place in my work-bashing vocabulary. Thanks for that. Also, the exchange described above is pretty close to the truth, though the less-than-PC parts were in my head. This guy was a COBOL programmer in the 80s and is currently trying to simultaneously learn VB and convince us of its superiority over C#, which means his technical recommendations are immediately suspect.

    Also, fuck CS for double backspacing when I only press the key once. In fact, fuck CS all around.

    Yes, i would be suspect of his suggestions as well, considering there is no advantage of one language over the other now that they both target the same CLR.   Except VB doesn't have all the fancy code decorations.

    Yes it does, it just has different decorations.  99.5% of the experience and skill necessary to use the two languages is common, the other 0.5% is unique to the language.  It takes a lot longer to figure out the .Net class library than it does to figure out whether arrays are indexed using "[" or "(".  I still can't think of a rational modern justification for case-sensitivity within a language itself.


  • @Jaime said:

    I still can't think of a rational modern justification for case-sensitivity within a language itself.
     

    Is there a rational modern justification for case-insensitivity? It adds nothing to the usability of a language.

    case-sensitive languages:
    - force people to write consistently. With VB and SQL, you already see that everybody's doing their own thing. That's not good.
    - don't require compilers and interpreters to have some added complexity to look up two arbitrary characters for the same keyword's character. It has to be explicitly added and I personally wouldn't want to waste my time on that if I were writing a compiler.

    I'm assuming you know about these. Why do you consider them not modern and rational?

    case-sensitive languages also:
    - facilitate errors stemming from mistyped case, which is a common typo for the fast typist on the go. Your IDE will catch this, so it's not a significant problem.



  • @Lingerance said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    @OzPeter said:
    @Medezark said:
    SQL --- I pronounce Sequel  when I've been told over and over it should be  essque-el.

    A friend of mine pronounces it (tongue-in-cheek) as "Squirrel"

    Since the language is based on SEQUEL, I say calling it sequel is just fine.

    Since C is based on B I say calling it B is just fine.

    Since VB.NET is based on VB I say calling it VB is just fine.

    Since VB is based on QuickBASIC I say calling it QuickBASIC is just fine.

    Since a calculator is based on an abacus I say calling it an abacus is just fine.



    I'm going to have to disagree.

    Lingerance disagreeing with me? Giving some ridiculous overblown taking-it-to-the-extreme reason?

    SHOCKER!

    (BTW, In what way is a calculator based on an abacus? You might have gone one step too ridiculous.)



  • I've just learned that Autodesk Softimage is supposed to be pronounced SoftiMAHge, like you if you were Frrench, oui?



  • @dhromed said:

    @Jaime said:

    I still can't think of a rational modern justification for case-sensitivity within a language itself.
     

    Is there a rational modern justification for case-insensitivity? It adds nothing to the usability of a language.

    case-sensitive languages:
    - force people to write consistently. With VB and SQL, you already see that everybody's doing their own thing. That's not good.
    - don't require compilers and interpreters to have some added complexity to look up two arbitrary characters for the same keyword's character. It has to be explicitly added and I personally wouldn't want to waste my time on that if I were writing a compiler.

    I'm assuming you know about these. Why do you consider them not modern and rational?

    case-sensitive languages also:
    - facilitate errors stemming from mistyped case, which is a common typo for the fast typist on the go. Your IDE will catch this, so it's not a significant problem.

    Case insensitivity is more human-friendy.  People understand that in written language, case confers meta-information, not information.

    Case sensitivity doesn't enforce consistency any more than case insensitivity.  In both, you can have inconsistencies from one declaration to another, and neither creates inconsistency on reference, however, case insensitive languages do it better.  In VB.Net, if you get the case of a variable wrong, it doesn't underline it as an error, it simply fixes it.  Intellisense also doesn't require the case be correct in order to start helping.

    My "modern" comment was about the compiler having to do case conversion.  Fortunately, it almost never actually happens as the IDE fixes case as you type.  Even when it does, it's not a big deal.  Adding case insensitivity isn't a waste of time, and isn't all that difficult.  I could write an English case normalizer in about five minutes if you asked me to.  This is no more a luxury than allowing you to use language keywords rather than archaic codes like in assembly.



  • @Jaime said:

    Case insensitivity is more human-friendy
    Yet you choose to write in a case sensitive manner. Methinks there is an issue with this.



  • According to my mom, who worked in support at Oracle when it was being developed, it's "sequel".


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