Www.zdnet.com doesn't want me to read it?



  • So, in my rounds across the interwebs i opened www.zdnet.com only to be almost immediately greeted by an ie pop-up warning that the page was requesting to close the window.

    This has been happening sporadically since Thursday, and as it does not happen on every visit to the page, I suspect that some randomly loaded advertisement is to blame.

    the WTF?  A Flash Ad that is so self concious that it wants to shut down IE before you can read it.



  • Maybe it's trying to do a popup, then close that one (for whatever reason), but the script's window reference instead points to the main window object due to a popup blocker and/or limited access to the location bar and the window object.



  •  The real wtf is that you're using IE. ;)



  • Fortunately, not my WTF.



  • @Medezark said:

    Fortunately, not my WTF.

    I accuse you of lying.

    And TRWTF is that anyone still visits ZDNet, I thought its traffic dropped to insignificant at the end of the dotcom bubble like the other 50 million news/tech sites. I see it's now owned by CBS.



  • @The_Assimilator said:

    @Medezark said:
    Fortunately, not my WTF.

    I accuse you of lying.

    And TRWTF is that anyone still visits ZDNet, I thought its traffic dropped to insignificant at the end of the dotcom bubble like the other 50 million news/tech sites. I see it's now owned by CBS.

    No, not my wtf.using IE.  IE is the only browser my company allows.  As for visiting ZDNet, there's a "green" blog I like to visit and inject common sense into, especially when they have posts about how wonderful giant wind or wave energy farms are in relation to climate change.  Sure, go ahead and steal energy from the Gulf Stream. . . . . THAT'S not going to change the climate one bit.



  • @Medezark said:

    No, not my wtf.using IE.  IE is the only browser my company allows.  As for visiting ZDNet, there's a "green" blog I like to visit and inject common sense into, especially when they have posts about how wonderful giant wind or wave energy farms are in relation to climate change.  Sure, go ahead and steal energy from the Gulf Stream. . . . . THAT'S not going to change the climate one bit.

    Must... let... go...

    Ah, I can't. You're an idiot if you think anything on the scale of a few windfarms or tidal generators can influence the gulf stream in any way. They're idiots if they believe windfarms or tidal generators can replace coal/oil/nuclear plants for creating base load.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Medezark said:
    No, not my wtf.using IE.  IE is the only browser my company allows.  As for visiting ZDNet, there's a "green" blog I like to visit and inject common sense into, especially when they have posts about how wonderful giant wind or wave energy farms are in relation to climate change.  Sure, go ahead and steal energy from the Gulf Stream. . . . . THAT'S not going to change the climate one bit.

    Must... let... go...

    Ah, I can't. You're an idiot if you think anything on the scale of a few windfarms or tidal generators can influence the gulf stream in any way. They're idiots if they believe windfarms or tidal generators can replace coal/oil/nuclear plants for creating base load.

    Ah, but I'm not thinking of the small, isolated wind farms and tdal generators. I'm thinking of the mega-massive project's that get bandied about.

    But what's a handful? What's the total energy and how much are we planning to extract from it? And what percentage of extracted energy is a lot or a little.



  • @Medezark said:

    Sure, go ahead and steal energy from the Gulf Stream. . . . . THAT'S not going to change the climate one bit.
     

    Total world's demand is about 1% of the stream's estimated energy content, though I admit that supposing we could easily tap into it, who knows what the effects would be of tapping even a percent of a percent of its momentum.



  • @Medezark said:

    Ah, but I'm not thinking of the small, isolated wind farms and tdal generators. I'm thinking of the mega-massive project's that get bandied about.

    But what's a handful? What's the total energy and how much are we planning to extract from it? And what percentage of extracted energy is a lot or a little.

    Well, then it's moot. Mega-massive projects would be useless because, as I said above, they can't create base load.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    the solution is car-sized nuclear piles like in Fallout 3<input name="ctl00$ctl00$bcr$bcr$ctl00$PostList$ctl08$ctl23$ctl01" id="ctl00_ctl00_bcr_bcr_ctl00_PostList_ctl08_ctl23_ctl01_State" value="value:Filed%20under%3A%20%3Ca%20href%3D%22%2Ftags%2F_2900_%2Fdefault.aspx%22%20rel%3D%22tag%22%3E)%3C%2Fa%3E%2C%20%3Ca%20href%3D%22%2Ftags%2Fthe%2Bsolution%2Bis%2Bcar-sized%2Bnuclear%2Bpiles%2Blike%2Bin%2BFallout%2B3%2Fdefault.aspx%22%20rel%3D%22tag%22%3Ethe%20solution%20is%20car-sized%20nuclear%20piles%20like%20in%20Fallout%203%3C%2Fa%3E" type="hidden">
     

    YEASSSHHH



  • Not strictly true that mega-renewables can't handle base load. When the day comes that we can adequately harness tidal energy, we'll have so much to play with that inefficiencies in storage (through pumped hydro schemes, for example) won't matter.



  • @The_Assimilator said:

    @Medezark said:
    Fortunately, not my WTF.

    I accuse you of lying.

    And TRWTF is that anyone still visits ZDNet, I thought its traffic dropped to insignificant at the end of the dotcom bubble like the other 50 million news/tech sites. I see it's now owned by CBS.

    zdnet.com is just a bunch of opinion pieces. It used to have news. So I'm now reading news.CNET.com...which is also turning into a bunch of opinion pieces (so-called "blogs", which used to be "weblogs" which used to be diaries). Anyone know where a person can get real tech news?



  • @SilentRunner said:

    zdnet.com is just a bunch of opinion pieces. It used to have news. So I'm now reading news.CNET.com...which is also turning into a bunch of opinion pieces (so-called "blogs", which used to be "weblogs" which used to be diaries). Anyone know where a person can get real tech news?

     

    As the broad in the dishwashing liquid commercial used to say, "you're soaking in it".



  • I wonder which has a greater effect: adding a few tens of PPM of carbon dioxide (all that the AGW scientists say are needed for OMG ARMAGEDDON) or disrupting 1% of the gulf stream.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @SilentRunner said:

    zdnet.com is just a bunch of opinion pieces. It used to have news. So I'm now reading news.CNET.com...which is also turning into a bunch of opinion pieces (so-called "blogs", which used to be "weblogs" which used to be diaries). Anyone know where a person can get real tech news?
    TheRegister. Sure, it's exceptionally snarky news, and a few writers have pet hates, but on the whole (especially once you get off the front page) it's about as good as you can get if you want tech news beyond "OMFG NEW IPHONE!!!!!" (It helps that El Reg is blackballed by Apple PR for daring to be snarky about the original iPhone, it's hype machine, and its remarkable shortcomings)



  •  Wired?

    Techcrunch?

     

    I really don't do this kind of website so I'm just namin' names.



  • @SilentRunner said:

    @The_Assimilator said:

    @Medezark said:
    Fortunately, not my WTF.

    I accuse you of lying.

    And TRWTF is that anyone still visits ZDNet, I thought its traffic dropped to insignificant at the end of the dotcom bubble like the other 50 million news/tech sites. I see it's now owned by CBS.

    zdnet.com is just a bunch of opinion pieces. It used to have news. So I'm now reading news.CNET.com...which is also turning into a bunch of opinion pieces (so-called "blogs", which used to be "weblogs" which used to be diaries). Anyone know where a person can get real tech news?

     

    Some people like Ars Technica.



  • Ars Technica is good

     



  •  tech news ? no problem, just ask.

     >>> here.


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