Intel Buying Mcafee for $7B?





  • Clearly they didn't read this book. It sounds like a bad idea, even at a 60% discount, never mind a 60% premium.

    Sell your Intel stock.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

     Read the topic as "Intel Buying Mcafee for $78?"

     

    I am dissapoint.



  • @arty said:

    WTF?

    Yah I'm stumped by this one. The only thing I can think of is getting users to install AppUp alongside McAfee? But surely they could ink a deal for that without buying the company outright.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Yah I'm stumped by this one. The only thing I can think of is getting users to install AppUp alongside McAfee?
     

    Now its not just going to be the stupid little 'intel inside' sticker on new machines but a 'protected by McAfee' one as well.



  • Maybe they have some idea to integrate hardware based heuristic anti-virus directly into their chipsets or cpu's?

     

    I used to carry a hardware anti-virus product around where I used to work, a lead pipe about 2' long and 2" in diameter. Whenever one of our "manager" types asked me to clean their infected machines, I would threaten to use it on them or forward their browser history to their spouse, their choice.  Rarely had to clean the same machine twice.



  • @locallunatic said:

    Filed under: How do I put quotes around protected inside of quotes?

     

    In traditional U.S. punctuation rules, you use double quotes for the outermost level, single quotes for an inner level. If you're using single quotes at the outer level, double-quote the inner level.

    Sorta like JavaScript, I guess.



  • @Someone You Know said:

    In traditional U.S. punctuation rules, you use double quotes for the outermost level, single quotes for an inner level. If you're using single quotes at the outer level, double-quote the inner level.

    Sorta like JavaScript, I guess.

    I do it the other way 'round in my JavaScript. I like the single-quotes. Probably because I also deal with a lot of SQL and SQL has boners for single-quotes.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Someone You Know said:

    In traditional U.S. punctuation rules, you use double quotes for the outermost level, single quotes for an inner level. If you're using single quotes at the outer level, double-quote the inner level.

    Sorta like JavaScript, I guess.

    I do it the other way 'round in my JavaScript. I like the single-quotes. Probably because I also deal with a lot of SQL and SQL has boners for single-quotes.

     

    I do too, actually. In my case it's just because (on a U.S. keyboard, at least) it takes marginally less effort to type a single quote than a double quote.



  • @Someone You Know said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    @Someone You Know said:

    In traditional U.S. punctuation rules, you use double quotes for the outermost level, single quotes for an inner level. If you're using single quotes at the outer level, double-quote the inner level.

    Sorta like JavaScript, I guess.

    I do it the other way 'round in my JavaScript. I like the single-quotes. Probably because I also deal with a lot of SQL and SQL has boners for single-quotes.

     

    I do too, actually. In my case it's just because (on a U.S. keyboard, at least) it takes marginally less effort to type a single quote than a double quote.

     

    With a little practice and fat fingers I'm sure you could get rid of that extra work.



  • $78 is closer to what they are worth.

     



  • @Weng said:

     Read the topic as "Intel Buying Mcafee for $78?"

     

    Me too.  I need a bigger font.



  • @Medezark said:

    I used to carry a hardware anti-virus product around where I used to work, a lead pipe about 2' long and 2" in diameter. Whenever one of our "manager" types asked me to clean their infected machines, I would threaten to use it on them or forward their browser history to their spouse, their choice.  Rarely had to clean the same machine twice.

    I went with the 'name and shame' option at one job. The company had been burned by an outside IT firm that padded hours and intentionally broke things, so we negotiated a non-standard contract. They'd pay the equivalent of 10 hours a week for any week where I spent that or less working to keep me 'on call, but my pay would be capped at the equivalent of 20 hours per week unless it was a project approved in writing. I wasn't required to appear in the office so long as nothing was broken and when something did break, any time the same day was fine. And the employees were a dream; It only took one two hour session with all of them at once to cure what little bad behavior they had in the past. No Bonzai-Buddy, no viruses pretending to be a bowling game, nothing. The second month there I worked two hours swapping a dead printer and making sure the the tape backups were working properly, and got paid for forty.

    Eventually they hired a new salesman. This guy spent five hours a day browsing porn, looking for a second mistress, and playing warez games. Even with a decent virus scanner this guy would hose his machine in under a week, and I was getting sick of it. So, as a 'warning to other users', after I cleaned his machine the third time I forwarded the juicy bits from browser history as well as a list of what I removed to the sales and secretarial staff. The company was small and my visits were infrequent, so when the email went out everyone knew instantly who had been naughty. He got fired not long after that. (The evangelical Christian owner was not pleased with him.)

    At another place, I went with instant gratification name and shame. I installed a proxy server and kept the log scrolling by in a terminal. When I caught someone doing anything super bad I'd send a popup message to the entire office.

    "Warning! Network access to http://www.xxxhorselove.com detected from MachineName. Please notify your Administrator." sure gets everyone talking and looking over their cube walls, I'll tell you. 

     



  • @Medezark said:

    Maybe they have some idea to integrate hardware based heuristic anti-virus directly into their chipsets or cpu's?
     

    Fuck, I'm never buying intel chips again.



  • @The article said:

    “Perhaps the most troubling part of the McAfee deal is the prospect that they will mismanage their new division into irrelevance,” Jaquith writes.

    Frankly, I'd call that a win.

    But the prospect of McAfee software embedded on the chip with [b]no way to get it off[/b] certainly isn't one that encourages me to buy an Intel chip next time I upgrade.



  • @Weng said:

     Read the topic as "Intel Buying Mcafee for $78?"

     

    I am dissapoint.

     

    I read is just as "$7B", and expected some kind of a screenshot/photo showing "$7B" as a price (7B being 123 in decimal). Then I realized that "B" stands for billions. Then I went "oh wait...".



  • McAfee is practically malware itself now, always trying to worm its way onto people's systems as "free security scans" with tiny little checkboxes embedded into the installers of other programs.  If Intel is actually trying to say that this is an acquisition worth paying a 60% premium for, I can only assume that the executives are shorting their own stock and that this is a deliberate ploy to cripple the company.



  • @Aaron said:

    McAfee is practically malware itself now, always trying to worm its way onto people's systems as "free security scans" with tiny little checkboxes embedded into the installers of other programs.  If Intel is actually trying to say that this is an acquisition worth paying a 60% premium for, I can only assume that the executives are shorting their own stock and that this is a deliberate ploy to cripple the company.

     

    Ditto for Symantec. 

    If they imbed that bloatware (McAfee) into their chips, I will become a lifelong fan of AMD. 



  • @NoOneImportant said:

    Even with a decent virus scanner this guy would hose his machine in under a week, and I was getting sick of it.

    How about making the users non-administrators? Or that was Windows 98?



  • @Weng said:

     Read the topic as "Intel Buying Mcafee for $78?"

     

    I am dissapoint.



    I keep reading this news as "McCafe".



  •  Actually, you have just revealed the next plans of intel; they'll buy Starbucks on the premise that if you have a PC, you also need lots of coffee. Lots of synergy there.



  •  @b-redeker said:

    Sun's next!<input name="ctl00$ctl00$bcr$bcr$ctl00$PostList$ctl22$ctl23$ctl01" id="ctl00_ctl00_bcr_bcr_ctl00_PostList_ctl22_ctl23_ctl01_State" value="value:Filed%20under%3A%20%3Ca%20href%3D%22%2Ftags%2FSun_2700_s%2Bnext_2100_%2Fdefault.aspx%22%20rel%3D%22tag%22%3ESun's%20next!%3C%2Fa%3E" type="hidden">

    Too late!



  • @b-redeker said:

     Actually, you have just revealed the next plans of intel; they'll buy Starbucks on the premise that if you have a PC, you also need lots of coffee. Lots of synergy there.

    Sorry I can't cite this, I saw it on Google Reader's public list:

    Intel CEO: "My computer's running slow. Could someone get me McAfee?"
    Intel Peon: "On it, boss!"

    (...)

    Intel Peon: "I got McAfee, boss."
    Intel CEO: "Cool! What version?"
    Intel Peon: "Version?"



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Sorry I can't cite this, I saw it on Google Reader's public list:

    Original:

    Intel CEO: "We need antivirus, can someone buy me McAfee?"
    Few hours later: "Done."
    "Great, which version?"
    "Version ... ?"

    (from http://twitter.com/adrianmw75/status/21579292721)



  • Makes perfect sense. Install McAfee and you'll think you need to upgrade your processor. All they have to do to make money is give the damn thing away free.



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    But the prospect of McAfee software embedded on the chip with no way to get it off certainly isn't one that encourages me to buy an Intel chip next time I upgrade.

    OMG hai guyz i kno computer werdz!!!!

    McAfee embedded on the processorszzzz lulzcopter!!!

    & i kno bold tag 2

    i have a doormat that says "Welcome 127.0.0.1" and i wear a binary watch!!!

    this whole script kiddie, nerds are cool culture drives me nuts. Real nerds are busy doing things, not spending their lives spewing a non-stop fountain of words they read on slashdot while looking for other people that hate "M$" and "crApple" (see i can do it too!) as much as they do.

    having no friends and being socially inept does not make you smart. Go back to playing madden 2k10 (or whatever sports game you like) alone. If you couldn't convince the cheerleaders, jocks, stoners, cowboys, goths, emo kids, vamps, and hipsters they you were one of them (which in truth only requires dressing like them and standing near them) then you wont be able to convince the "nerds" either (that actually requires knowledge beyond which bands to pretend to like).



  • ???



  • @chikinpotpi said:

    @Scarlet Manuka said:
    But the prospect of McAfee software embedded on the chip with no way to get it off certainly isn't one that encourages me to buy an Intel chip next time I upgrade.

    OMG hai guyz i kno computer werdz!!!!

    McAfee embedded on the processorszzzz lulzcopter!!!

    & i kno bold tag 2

    i have a doormat that says "Welcome 127.0.0.1" and i wear a binary watch!!!

    this whole script kiddie, nerds are cool culture drives me nuts. Real nerds are busy doing things, not spending their lives spewing a non-stop fountain of words they read on slashdot while looking for other people that hate "M$" and "crApple" (see i can do it too!) as much as they do.

    having no friends and being socially inept does not make you smart. Go back to playing madden 2k10 (or whatever sports game you like) alone. If you couldn't convince the cheerleaders, jocks, stoners, cowboys, goths, emo kids, vamps, and hipsters they you were one of them (which in truth only requires dressing like them and standing near them) then you wont be able to convince the "nerds" either (that actually requires knowledge beyond which bands to pretend to like).

    Your entirely baseless and utterly ridiculous rant has brought tears of joy to my eyes.



  • @chikinpotpi said:

    @Scarlet Manuka said:
    But the prospect of McAfee software embedded on the chip with no way to get it off certainly isn't one that encourages me to buy an Intel chip next time I upgrade.

    OMG hai guyz i kno computer werdz!!!!

    McAfee embedded on the processorszzzz lulzcopter!!!

    & i kno bold tag 2

    i have a doormat that says "Welcome 127.0.0.1" and i wear a binary watch!!!

    this whole script kiddie, nerds are cool culture drives me nuts. Real nerds are busy doing things, not spending their lives spewing a non-stop fountain of words they read on slashdot while looking for other people that hate "M$" and "crApple" (see i can do it too!) as much as they do.

    Way to read the context guy.



  • @Lingerance said:

    @chikinpotpi said:
    @Scarlet Manuka said:
    But the prospect of McAfee software embedded on the chip with no way to get it off certainly isn't one that encourages me to buy an Intel chip next time I upgrade.

    OMG hai guyz i kno computer werdz!!!!

    McAfee embedded on the processorszzzz lulzcopter!!!

    & i kno bold tag 2

    i have a doormat that says "Welcome 127.0.0.1" and i wear a binary watch!!!

    this whole script kiddie, nerds are cool culture drives me nuts. Real nerds are busy doing things, not spending their lives spewing a non-stop fountain of words they read on slashdot while looking for other people that hate "M$" and "crApple" (see i can do it too!) as much as they do.

    Way to read the context guy.

    I can actually kind of slightly get what he's talking about, which is that Slashdot-type people will take any press release and immediately assume it portends doom in the worst way possible:

    Press Release: J.C. Penney to use RFID tags for inventory control

    First Slashdot Post: This means that the news is going to start a "underpants skidmark watch" using RFID tags from your JC Penney underwear purchase combined with the ubiquous RFID-reading devices like credit card scanners in grocery stories, and every night it'll feature your photo and tell all your girlfriends exactly how disgusting you are!! And when you try to microwave the underwear to remove the RFID tags your dog will die of radiation poisoning!!!!

    The problem with this little rant is:
    1) It assumes everybody here is exactly like people at Slashdot, which isn't true. Thank God.
    2) It's ridiculously overblown, when the original post is actually pretty down-to-Earth.



  • @chikinpotpi said:

    @Scarlet Manuka said:
    But the prospect of McAfee software embedded on the chip with no way to get it off certainly isn't one that encourages me to buy an Intel chip next time I upgrade.
    OMG hai guyz i kno computer werdz!!!!
    McAfee embedded on the processorszzzz lulzcopter!!!
    & i kno bold tag 2
    i have a doormat that says "Welcome 127.0.0.1" and i wear a binary watch!!!

    this whole script kiddie, nerds are cool culture drives me nuts. Real nerds are busy doing things, not spending their lives spewing a non-stop fountain of words they read on slashdot while looking for other people that hate "M$" and "crApple" (see i can do it too!) as much as they do.

    having no friends and being socially inept does not make you smart. Go back to playing madden 2k10 (or whatever sports game you like) alone. If you couldn't convince the cheerleaders, jocks, stoners, cowboys, goths, emo kids, vamps, and hipsters they you were one of them (which in truth only requires dressing like them and standing near them) then you wont be able to convince the "nerds" either (that actually requires knowledge beyond which bands to pretend to like).

    For the record, I am busy doing things (perhaps unlike you, I have a job, for which I am fairly well paid) - although the things I am doing are sufficiently boring that I am taking time out from doing them to post here, also - and don't read slashdot or own any "geeky" merchandise. Nor do I particularly hate Microsoft, or Apple, though there are certainly things each could do better, as there are for any company. I run Windows at home because I don't see any particular benefit to running anything else, given that I mainly use the computer for games and web.

    Also, in case you're not aware, a "prospect" is something which may eventuate, not something that is certain. I don't think it's unreasonable to say that the acquisition naturally produces the prospect of McAfee software embedded on Intel chips, since according to the article this is Intel's own contention ("Intel’s notion that security should be baked into silicon rather than bolted on as an application"). I also don't think it's unreasonable to say that McAfee software, lately, seems to be a festering pile of crap that produces as many or more problems than it solves. If you disagree, of course, we can discuss the point.

    Also, you seem to think I am in high school, which has not been true for a little over 20 years. When I was in high school, I spent most of my free time in the library, not trying to socialise with anybody else. (Did you know that it's possible to have friends, even if you like going to the library? It turns out that some other people like going to the library too, and you can often be friends with them. As long as you don't talk too loudly when you're in the library with them, of course. Though if you're playing chess in the library chess rooms, it is naturally acceptable to say "check" or "checkmate" at the appropriate times, and even to make a little conversation; that's why the chess rooms have soundproofed doors.)

    I skipped all my school social events in favour of staying home and reading, except for the graduation after-party, which I felt I should attend. I'd still rather stay home and read a book than go to a party, but my wife makes me go sometimes 🙂 Oh, and I'm not a fan of sports games, though I do play them on the Wii (which, before you mock me, I won as a door prize at an Oracle "training" seminar which, as is often the case, turned out to be about 15% training and 85% sales pitch). Even if I did like sports games, I wouldn't buy any of the Madden series as I have little knowledge of and no interest in American football.



  • @arty said:

    WTF?

    Right. Who would think they'll be worth as much as the '{' char?



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    Also, in case you're not aware, a "prospect" is something which may eventuate,

    To save everybody else a few seconds, "eventuate" is actually a word.

    And Scarlet Manuka is being extraordinarily defensive to a post pretty much everybody on this board has been mocking. So... I guess he hit close to the target, eh! You Madden-playing, binary watch-wearing Slashdot reader!

    Or something.

    @Scarlet Manuka said:

    I skipped all my school social events in favour of staying home and reading,

    Actually the more I read of this, the sadder it gets. At least Madden is played with a couple friends over, drinking beer...



  • @blakeyrat said:

    At least Madden is played with a couple friends over, drinking beer...
     

    BOOM!!



  • Yeah, I know I put a lot of effort into that post. But I assure you it was only as an alternative to doing some work. 😃

    Also, I don't like beer, so that's another reason not to play Madden. Apparently.

    Of course the main reason I couldn't have played Madden in highschool, even if I'd wanted to and it had been available in Australia, is that I finished highschool in 1989, at which time it apparently existed only on the Apple ][, and I didn't have one of those. For most of my highschool period the only computer games I played were on one of the old Z80-based micros.



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    Of course the main reason I couldn't have played Madden in highschool, even if I'd wanted to and it had been available in Australia, is that I finished highschool in 1989, at which time it apparently existed only on the Apple ][, and I didn't have one of those. For most of my highschool period the only computer games I played were on one of the old Z80-based micros.

    Yes, because obviously it's impossible for people to buy video games once they leave high school.

    Seriously, WTF? I think you're an alien trying, and failing, to blend in with human society. Don't like beer? From Australia? None of those adds up!

    I mean, I'm trying to call you a loser here and you're over there obsessing over square pixels. Christ, man. You make me feel a lot better about my pathetic-ass life.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    my pathetic-ass life.
     

    This is true.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Scarlet Manuka said:
    Of course the main reason I couldn't have played Madden [b]in highschool[/b], even if I'd wanted to and it had been available in Australia, is that I finished highschool in 1989, at which time it apparently existed only on the Apple ][, and I didn't have one of those. For most of my highschool period the only computer games I played were on one of the old Z80-based micros.
    Yes, because obviously it's impossible for people to buy video games once they leave high school.

    Seriously, WTF? I think you're an alien trying, and failing, to blend in with human society. Don't like beer? From Australia? None of those adds up!

    I mean, I'm trying to call you a loser here and you're over there obsessing over square pixels. Christ, man. You make me feel a lot better about my pathetic-ass life.

    BTRBFY. The larger points about why I'm not interested in Madden I have made in an earlier post.

    I assure you, there are in fact people in Australia, here and there. I... I have no defense for not liking beer; I just don't. I'm sorry. You can have mine, if you like; it's not as if I was going to drink it anyway.



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    @Scarlet Manuka said:
    Of course the main reason I couldn't have played Madden in highschool, even if I'd wanted to and it had been available in Australia, is that I finished highschool in 1989, at which time it apparently existed only on the Apple ][, and I didn't have one of those. For most of my highschool period the only computer games I played were on one of the old Z80-based micros.
    Yes, because obviously it's impossible for people to buy video games once they leave high school.

    Seriously, WTF? I think you're an alien trying, and failing, to blend in with human society. Don't like beer? From Australia? None of those adds up!

    I mean, I'm trying to call you a loser here and you're over there obsessing over square pixels. Christ, man. You make me feel a lot better about my pathetic-ass life.

    BTRBFY. The larger points about why I'm not interested in Madden I have made in an earlier post.

    I assure you, there are in fact people in Australia, here and there. I... I have no defense for not liking beer; I just don't. I'm sorry. You can have mine, if you like; it's not as if I was going to drink it anyway.

    You realize that even with the bold Blakeyrat's point about not playing since HS is still valid right?


  • @Lingerance said:

    You realize that even with the bold Blakeyrat's point about not playing since HS is still valid right?

    I think the most disturbing part is that he doesn't like beer.



  •  There was Madden in/before 1989?



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    I assure you, there are in fact people in Australia, here and there. I... I have no defense for not liking beer; I just don't. I'm sorry. You can have mine, if you like; it's not as if I was going to drink it anyway.
    Are you a kangaroo in that case? Because I always thought that Aussies had to get their minimum daily dosage of beer or they turned into kangaroos.



  •  They turn into a yabby.

    And after thatm they turn into coconut crabs.



  • @davedavenotdavemaybedave said:

    Are you a kangaroo in that case? Because I always thought that Aussies had to get their minimum daily dosage of beer or they turned into kangaroos.

    Oh, I'm on supplements to prevent that. Isn't science wonderful?



  • @Scarlet Manuka said:

    @davedavenotdavemaybedave said:
    Are you a kangaroo in that case? Because I always thought that Aussies had to get their minimum daily dosage of beer or they turned into kangaroos.

    Oh, I'm on supplements to prevent that. Isn't science wonderful?

    The alien pod-person has some conception of "humor." Fascinating.



  • @dhromed said:

    coconut crabs
    ARE FUCKING AWESOME.

    What would you do if you went out your front door and saw this?




  • @belgariontheking said:

    @dhromed said:

    coconut crabs
    ARE FUCKING AWESOME.

    What would you do if you went out your front door and saw this?


    Start a big-ass pot of water boiling.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @belgariontheking said:

    @dhromed said:

    coconut crabs
    ARE FUCKING AWESOME.

    What would you do if you went out your front door and saw this?


    Start a big-ass pot of water boiling.

     

    I was thinking the same thing. I did a google search for 'coconut crab' and found a web site which included this:

     

    The Coconut Crab lives almost exclusively on small tropical islands.

    ...my first thought was, "...and what do they eat if there aren't any islands available?"



  • @PeriSoft said:

    ...my first thought was, "...and what do they eat if there aren't any islands available?"
     

    Pretty sure they can adapt to the mainland.



  • @dhromed said:

    @PeriSoft said:

    ...my first thought was, "...and what do they eat if there aren't any islands available?"
     

    Pretty sure they can adapt to the mainland.

     

    Actually, although Coconut Crabs have been known to eat peninsulars when desparate, there is no record of them eating a continental landmass.


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