Just in case...



  • Wunderground's temperature chart scaling for this past March in Kugluktuk, Nunavut covers all the bases.









    (Don't bother asking why I'm looking at the weather history for Kugluktuk, Nunavut. It's just a thing.)



  • Is the WTF that the only place in the universe where the temperature drops below absolute zero is Darlington station?



  • They have a fairly constant measuring equipment. It is always 0 degrees fahrenheit.

    I only wonder when they expect to reach -10000 degrees.



  • @PeriSoft said:

    (Don't bother asking why I'm looking at the weather history for Kugluktuk, Nunavut. It's just a thing.)
     

    I will ask.

    What kind of thing?



  • @TheRider said:

    I only wonder when they expect to reach -10000 degrees.
    You're misreading the scale. It goes down to 1000 degrees F. You see, when temperatures drop below absolute zero, there's a tipping point at which temperatures run out of characters, and temperatures become positive again. It's like a signed integer error, only it happens with thermodynamics. That tipping point occurs just below -9999 degrees in the Fahrenheit scale, and -5572 degrees in the Celsius scale. This is a theoretical rule of thermodynamics, that will be proven this winter when Hell freezes over again, as it does every year.



  • @dhromed said:

    @PeriSoft said:

    (Don't bother asking why I'm looking at the weather history for Kugluktuk, Nunavut. It's just a thing.)
     

    I will ask.

    What kind of thing?

    Dude, monitoring the temperature of cold places is hot!

    I bet it's around minus 50 Celisius right now over Lake Vostok.



  • @TarquinWJ said:

    @TheRider said:
    I only wonder when they expect to reach -10000 degrees.
    You're misreading the scale. It goes down to 1000 degrees F. You see, when temperatures drop below absolute zero, there's a tipping point at which temperatures run out of characters, and temperatures become positive again. It's like a signed integer error, only it happens with thermodynamics. That tipping point occurs just below -9999 degrees in the Fahrenheit scale, and -5572 degrees in the Celsius scale. This is a theoretical rule of thermodynamics, that will be proven this winter when Hell freezes over again, as it does every year.
    I'm not sure if you were implying actualy physics knowledge, but just in case anyone is curious, there is a sort of "wrap around" temperature in extreme systems:  [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_temperature[/url].  In short, you can add so much entropy to a system that adding any more heat actually causes the system to become more ordered instead of less.  It's kind of interesting.

    You may now go about your WTF.



  • [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]@dhromed said:

    @PeriSoft said:

    (Don't bother asking why I'm looking at the weather history for Kugluktuk, Nunavut. It's just a thing.)
     

    I will ask.

    What kind of thing?

    Dude, monitoring the temperature of cold places is hot!

    I bet it's around minus 50 Celisius right now over Lake Vostok.

    [/quote] 

     <3

    Seriously, though: -50 at Vostok? It'll hit -50 in midsummer! Right now it's more like -75.

    Yeah, the temperature thing started when I was pissed off at how cold it was in the beginning of March, so I decided to look at the temperatures of places that are even colder so I'd feel better about it. Kugluktuk was the coldest place I could find. Irkutsk, Russia gets colder in the winter, but it's pretty warm in the summer; Tromso, Norway only gets up to about 58f in the summer but pretty much never goes much below freezing in the winter, either. It's like LA, but 20 degrees f colder.

    It's actually kind of interesting; some places like Irkutsk have absurdly wild temperature swings (high of 95f one day, high of 48f the next), some are pretty much the same temperature all year (Puerto Rico), and some are normal - which means, of course, that they have weather patterns like where I live.

    Vostok Station is pretty absurd, though, as its wikipedia climate bar graph demonstrates. Not only is the air temperature hitting -100f on a regular basis during the winter, but it's usually windy to boot. Wind chill of -135? Better get your chapstick...



  • @PeriSoft said:

    Vostok Station is pretty absurd, though, as its wikipedia climate bar graph demonstrates. Not only is the air temperature hitting -100f on a regular basis during the winter, but it's usually windy to boot. Wind chill of -135? Better get your chapstick...

    From Wikipedia:  "Acclimatization to such conditions can take from a week to two months and is accompanied by headaches, eye twitches, ear pains, nose bleeds, perceived suffocation, sudden rises in blood pressure, loss of sleep, reduced appetite, vomiting, joint and muscle pain, arthritis, and weight loss".

     I had the same problems when i first starting posting here.



  • I don't like that there is F and C, Hg and hPa, mph and km/h, but there is no scale for wind direction in radians.



  • @Abdiel said:

    I don't like that there is F and C, Hg and hPa, mph and km/h, but there is no scale for wind direction in radians.


    Did you want imperial radians or metric radians?



  • @RTapeLoadingError said:

    Is the WTF that the only place in the universe where the temperature drops below absolute zero is Darlington station?

     

    All UK railway stations are designed to be colder than the surrounding area. In Darlington's case, it was probably built on a Viking burial mound. Either that or it's a portal to some hideous other dimension[1]. And it's best not to ask about Bristol Parkway.

     [1] try the 11:35 to Middlesbrough. That should cover it.



  • @El_Heffe said:

    From Wikipedia:  "Acclimatization to such conditions can take from a week to two months and is accompanied by headaches, eye twitches, ear pains, nose bleeds, perceived suffocation, sudden rises in blood pressure, loss of sleep, reduced appetite, vomiting, joint and muscle pain, arthritis, and weight loss".
     

    That sounds pretty much similar to altitude sickness

    any one or more of the following symptoms, may indicate altitude
    sickness:

     

    So possibly it has something to do with being unable to bind oxygen at those extreme temperatures.



  • @b-redeker said:

    @El_Heffe said:

    From Wikipedia:  "Acclimatization to such conditions can take from a week to two months and is accompanied by headaches, eye twitches, ear pains, nose bleeds, perceived suffocation, sudden rises in blood pressure, loss of sleep, reduced appetite, vomiting, joint and muscle pain, arthritis, and weight loss".
     

    That sounds pretty much similar to altitude sickness

    any one or more of the following symptoms, may indicate altitude
    sickness:

     

    So possibly it has something to do with being unable to bind oxygen at those extreme temperatures.

    Or maybe is has to do with oxygen not getting to your tissues because your blood has turned into red ice.

    In the brazillian station in the south pole, people once used a refrigerator as a heater. Due to its thermal insulation it was hotter than the living room. There were also stories about making ice cream by leaving milk shake on the kitchen table.



  • [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]In the brazillian station in the south pole, people once used a refrigerator as a heater. Due to its thermal insulation it was hotter than the living room. There were also stories about making ice cream by leaving milk shake on the kitchen table.[/quote] 

    There's a Brazilian fastfood restaurant at the South Pole? Cool, I want to go there!


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