Android alarm WTF



  •  I have an Android 1.5phone and when I set the alarm I get a message "This alarm is set for 8 hours and 31 minutes from now" (for example). However when I set my alarm yesterday, it said "This alarm is set for 8 hours and 60 minutes from now".



  • Is there a leap second due?



  • 9 hours (OK 8 hours and 60 minutes) sleep!!! What are you, some kind of King?



  • @DaveyDaveDave said:

    9 hours (OK 8 hours and 60 minutes) sleep!!! What are you, some kind of King?

    At what point did he say he sets his alarm at the instant of sleep? Besides, 9 hours isn't that excessive. Teenagers can manage up to 14-15 easily.



  • TRWTF is using Android 1.5



  • @Cypher87 said:

    TRWTF is using Android 1.5

    The Real WTF is that Samsung doesn't provide any updates to that phone (Galaxy)



  • @pbean said:

    @Cypher87 said:

    TRWTF is using Android 1.5

    The Real WTF is that Samsung doesn't provide any updates to that phone (Galaxy)

    I bought an Android phone recently.

    Prepare for rant.

    The number of phones that ship with older versions of Android and aren't upgradeable is incredible. Just finding one that was both a good form-factor and ran Android 2.2 was a challenge. But it's worth it to get an open phone, right?

    Ah, but that's the problem. ATT installed a bunch of junk on the phone I didn't want, but hey it's Android, I'll just format it and re-install the software from scratch like I would with a Windows machine.

    Nope! Despite all the noise Android fans make about how "open" their phone is, if you want to delete certain programs, you *still* need to root the phone, just like you would with an iPhone. (Even after rooting it, I can't seem to get rid of the gmail app which I don't use at all.) Open my ass. And the website with the rooting instructions is some forum filled with the worst instructions in the universe, making far too many assumptions about the user, leaving out tons of steps, and completely glossing over extremely important points. Took hours.

    That all said, I'm still really happy with the phone, since it has a much better camera and better battery life than my iPhone (but only *after* deleting the ATT stuff.) There's a lot of usability gripes, Google badly needs to hire some UI people to work on Android, but all-in-all I'm happy I bought it.



  • @Flatline said:

    Teenagers can manage up to 14-15 easily.

    Yes, the good old days.

    Wake up at 14:00, eat, watch TV, go out smoke weed, drink beer, eat, play some PS, more weed, eat, more beer, get in trouble, last joint, eat, go to bed. Sleep 14 hours. Repeat



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Open my ass.
    I'd rather not.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Nope! Despite all the noise Android fans make about how "open" their phone is, if you want to delete certain programs, you still need to root the phone, just like you would with an iPhone.

    So you bought a locked phone, and expected it not to be locked?



  • @Faxmachinen said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    Nope! Despite all the noise Android fans make about how "open" their phone is, if you want to delete certain programs, you still need to root the phone, just like you would with an iPhone.

    So you bought a locked phone, and expected it not to be locked?

    More like, "for months, I've been hearing Android mouthpieces telling me how great and flexible and unlocked their phones are, then when I bought one I found out they were all locked."

    So yes, you're right: I bought a locked phone and expected it not to be locked, because from what the Android fan-boys were telling me I didn't even know there was such a thing as a "locked" Android phone.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @Faxmachinen said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    Nope! Despite all the noise Android fans make about how "open" their phone is, if you want to delete certain programs, you still need to root the phone, just like you would with an iPhone.

    So you bought a locked phone, and expected it not to be locked?

    More like, "for months, I've been hearing Android mouthpieces telling me how great and flexible and unlocked their phones are, then when I bought one I found out they were all locked."

    So yes, you're right: I bought a locked phone and expected it not to be locked, because from what the Android fan-boys were telling me I didn't even know there was such a thing as a "locked" Android phone.

     

    So ... you bought something because fanboys said it was perfect, and it didn't occur to you to do any actual research before picking a product.

    That's still your fault, not Android's.

    BTW, when people say Android is great because it's an open platform, they're generally referring to the fact that anyone can release apps for it, in contrast to iOS where Apple have all kinds of arbitrary restrictions in place and the goalposts are constantly shifting.



  • @Iago said:

    So ... you bought something because fanboys said it was perfect, and it didn't occur to you to do any actual research before picking a product.

    Well some of the fanboys were friends of mine who follow phones a lot more closely than I do, so I asked them for advice.

    @Iago said:

    That's still your fault, not Android's.

    Duh? Jesus shit.

    Did I ever say it was Android's fault? Fuck, did I even say I disliked Android?

    You're a worse fanboy than my useless friends. Look, why not wait until I actually *say* I hate Android before you do the fanboy thing and jump down my throat, k?



  • adb shell pm list packages -f

    Each app is on a separate line. The package name and apk location are delimited by a equal sign or something. I may have the wrong switch, but I don't think so. For example:

    /system/app/packagename.apk=com.companyname.packagename
    
    adb remount
    adb shell rm -rf /system/app/packagename.apk
    adb shell pm uninstall com.companyname.packagename
    

    I'm not in the mood to plug in my N1 to get the package name and apk information right now, but that should fix you up.
    Fixed the line break issue. -- Ling



  • @blakeyrat said:

    So yes, you're right: I bought a locked phone and expected it not to be locked, because from what the Android fan-boys were telling me I didn't even know there was such a thing as a "locked" Android phone.

    For a lot of purposes there isn't.

    On Apple you have to pay to become a developer and obtain the official SDKs. On Android, the SDK is provided free of charge to anyone who wants it.
    On Apple you have to put your application in iTunes App Store for other people to use it (or jailbreak your phone with all the risks that incurs). On Android you just untick the "Only use the android market" option in your settings, throw the APK onto your phone and run it to install.

    On a growing number of Android phones, you can just reflash the recovery via fastboot and create your own variation of the Android OS with your own customised Kernel. 

    So, compared to the iPhone, the Android platform is far more open, hence why people state so.



  • I have an htc droid phone, and the alarm clock only vibrates i cant get it to actually make noise, and ive set it to do that?



  • @RickiSonia said:

    I have an htc droid phone, and the alarm clock only vibrates i cant get it to actually make noise, and ive set it to do that?

    Droid 1 owner here. Biggest among my few gripes about the OS is that very very little is actually documented anywhere. The only way to find out how half the phone works is to just play with it. For instance, the OS actually has five (possibly more) volume settings: Alarm, Call, Ringer, Navigation, Media. Call can only be adjusted during a call, Media can only be adjusted when a program has opened the media API. Navigation is adjusted anytime Google Navigation is the active app, overriding the Media volume. (So if you have music playing in the background and Navigator open, like I do on roadtrips, the volume buttons do basically nothing. Big oversight IMO.) Otherwise, the volume buttons adjust the Ringer volume. To adjust your Alarm volume, you have to go select an alarm, go into the ringtone selection dialog, and THEN the volume buttons adjust the alarm volume. Nowhere do they actually explain this to you.

     Btw, when talking about phones, "Droid" only refers to a branding done by Verizon. There's about a dozen phones that have that branding, about half and half made by HTC and Motorola. "HTC Droid" could be any of six very different phones.


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