Dell Power supply



  • I saw a nice screen yesterday. The owner of that laptop had a broken Dell power supply. He bought a No-Name power supply (labeled "GPS"). As the power cord did not fit into the laptop he soldered the original cable to the new supply.

    The laptop starts and the following appeared

    [URL=http://img192.imageshack.us/i/dellpowersupply.jpg/][IMG]http://img192.imageshack.us/img192/9674/dellpowersupply.jpg[/IMG][/URL]

    Uploaded with [URL=http://imageshack.us]ImageShack.us[/URL]

    The battery does not charge but the machine is working...



  • And the WTF is ... that the computer is actually able to communicate with the power supply?
    Or that "$brand sucks, here's a random thing with $brand"?

    Hm, maybe the WTF has been removed due to the crisis...



  • Standard Dell behavior, yeah... when there's no data link to the supply (yes, TRWTF is existance of such) it's not charging, even if the power feed is good enough to power up.



  • This sounds like the sort of shit Epson (used to?) pull with their printers - if you don't use Epson approved cartridge refills, the performance of the printer is sub-optimal (to the point of usually refusing to recognise the cartridges, thus not printing.)



  • I started to get this same damned message from my 18 month old Dell laptop using the power supply that came with the stupid thing.

    The battery used to charge anyway. 

    6 months later, I stopped getting the message, but the battery only holds a charge for 15 seconds.



  • @bannedfromcoding said:

    Standard Dell behavior, yeah... when there's no data link to the supply (yes, TRWTF is existance of such) it's not charging, even if the power feed is good enough to power up.
    I wouldn't call it so much of a wtf.  I'd rather the hardware talking with the batteries than the batteries exploding for having dumb controller logic. And it's not like there is a standard to lion battery design*.  Between the alternatives of not monitoring the battery and not letting it charge, the latter is much safer.



  • @hallo.amt said:

    As the power cord did not fit into the laptop he soldered the original cable to the new supply.

    Maybe that should've been a hint that he should stop being a cheapass bastard and buy a proper (i.e. Dell) replacement power supply.



  •  TRWTF(tm) is that he's using his GPS as a laptop power supply.



  • @Xyro said:

    @bannedfromcoding said:

    Standard Dell behavior, yeah... when there's no data link to the supply (yes, TRWTF is existance of such) it's not charging, even if the power feed is good enough to power up.
    I wouldn't call it so much of a wtf.  I'd rather the hardware talking with the batteries than the batteries exploding for having dumb controller logic. And it's not like there is a standard to lion battery design*.  Between the alternatives of not monitoring the battery and not letting it charge, the latter is much safer.


    What about having that in the batter Module which knows its batter much Beter than the Power supply ?



  • Power supplies are Not that complicated, you can take a cheapo as a spare. Usually without problems. At least that was my belief and it worked quite well with my laptop. The original supply semmed quite cheap.



  • @hallo.amt said:

    What about having that in the batter Module which knows its batter much Beter than the Power supply ?

    I think the hardware is having a hard time talking with the keyboard. Or the user.



  • I've gotten no-name power supplies for Dell laptops before, you just have to find one that markets itself as compatible with your existing one.

    Of course, there are sometimes other setbacks, such as one I used for a while that had a power cord that was only like a foot long.



  • @The_Assimilator said:

    @hallo.amt said:

    As the power cord did not fit into the laptop he soldered the original cable to the new supply.

    Maybe that should've been a hint that he should stop being a cheapass bastard and buy a proper (i.e. Dell) replacement power supply.

    Bingo.  What, is Dell supposed to support any shitty power supply you plug in?  I suppose the same people complaining about this would be okay after the batteries explode and burn their nuts off?  What happens if the shitty power supply fries the laptop?  Should Dell have to provide a replacement?  I mean, the user can just claim they were using the original power supply.



  • @MiffTheFox said:

    Of course, there are sometimes other setbacks, such as one I used for a while that had a power cord that was only like a foot long
     

     So, you can get them for $5 at Subway?

     

    <sorry>



  • For a moment there, I thought your laptop was asking you to reset the power supply.

    "The power supply isn't communicating. Please turn it off and on again."

     



  • I suppose the same people complaining about this would be okay after the batteries explode and burn their nuts off?

    The power regulator and charge circuit are built into the laptop and more often nowadays the battery itself. The job of the PSU is to supply up to X watts at Y volts. Within reason, even a highly incompatible charger should work to a degree. You'd have to plug it into a much bigger charger to get the ampage required to heat up the machine enough to blow up a battery, and internal fuses should prevent it from getting into that state anyway. You will not blow up your batteries or burn your nuts off with a knock-off charger. You might blow a fuse or the power management IC though.

    I've been using a no-name PSU for my Eee now for a year without problems. If you can charge these things off the terribly unstable power given out by a cigarette lighter socket, you honestly think a duff PSU could mess things up?



  • Seems pretty smart to me.  My new Dell laptop will work on the charger from the previous laptop, but it pops up a message saying it would prefer to have a 90W supply and the battery will take longer to charge.

    A bigger WTF is my Blackberry.  It won't charge off USB unless it can talk to the USB hub and confirm that it's allowed to draw power.  It won't charge off the wall charger that came with the phone and it won't charge from a laptop unless the laptop has Vista or the Blackberry software installed.  This behaviour changed during the phone's life because it used to work off any supply with a compatible plug - something got updated in the firmware without my knowlege.  Other people in the office with the same Blackberry have the same problem starting at the same time.

    I recently came across some circuit diagrams that will persuade an iPod to charge off a "dumb" USB supply.  Depending on the iPod model, there were 4 different configurations of resistors to hold the data lines high or low to suit the preferences of that model.  Is Apple trying to prevent you from using an older charger on your new iPod?



  •  @nexekho said:

    The job of the PSU is to supply up to X watts at Y volts.

     

    I thought that the job of the PSU was to supply Dell with $X dollars every Y months, something which a third-party charger is incapable of doing.  It's only natural that Dell would build in protections against the user circumventing the primary purpose of all of their hardware.

     



  • @Qwerty said:

     changed during the phone's life because it used to work off any supply with a compatible plug - something got updated in the firmware without my knowlege.  Other people in the office with the same Blackberry have the same problem starting at the same time.

    I recently came across some circuit diagrams that will persuade an iPod to charge off a "dumb" USB supply.  Depending on the iPod model, there were 4 different configurations of resistors to hold the data lines high or low to suit the preferences of that model.  Is Apple trying to prevent you from using an older charger on your new iPod?

    Yes. An older charger for an iPod would give out 12V. Newer iPod chargers give out 5V. With a flat battery, an iPod can cause some PCs to freeze or reset whe plugged in, hence why they now ask if they can draw X amount of current and only draw that amount. You can work around it by pretending to be a 5V wall charger.

    Its the same with my phone - if I plug it into the PC, it will be max 400mA, but if I plug it into a "dumb" wall charger it'll do nothing. If I plug it into the provided wall charger, it can draw upto 1A. Shorting the 5th and 4th pins in the USB connector also lets it work from a "dumb" power supply. 



  • @hallo.amt said:

    What about having that in the batter Module which knows its batter much Beter than the Power supply ?
     

    The batter module - that's the one for making pancakes, right?


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