Digital Music



  • I describe myself as a musically retarded guy, since I know nearly nothing about music theory. I am, however, very keen to learn. Having just finished Guitar Hero World Tour on Hard also made me wish to evolve to the next level.

    So I bought a real electric guitar, and I intend to enroll in a music school of some sort. I'll reach my own personal nirvana if I ever learn how to play Knights of Cydonia.

    One of my musically inclined pals, though, criticizes my instrument of choice. My guitar is an iAxe393, from Behringer. This guitar has a USB output, and you can use a PC or Mac for an amp and effects (it has a regular output just like any other guitar too). To my untrained ears, it sounds ok for a begginer's guitar, though not as good as other guitars that are just as cheap (it cost me 117 dollars).

    According to my friend, the USB output "kills" the experience of playing a string instrument because they are analogic. While we agree on the physics involved, I don't have enough acoustic resolution in my inner ears to know whether the sound of a string is being treated by a computer or not prior to coming out of the speakers.

    So, TDWTF, my question is: does it really matter if you're plugging your guitar on a PC? Is outputting your signal to a PC worse, because it eliminates a fundamental aspect of the guitar? Is it better, since you have more control over filters and tuning? Or do you think it's neither, but just another way to play?



  • [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]

    I describe myself as a musically retarded guy, since I know nearly nothing about music theory. I am, however, very keen to learn. Having just finished Guitar Hero World Tour on Hard also made me wish to evolve to the next level.

    So I bought a real electric guitar, and I intend to enroll in a music school of some sort. I'll reach my own personal nirvana if I ever learn how to play Knights of Cydonia.

    One of my musically inclined pals, though, criticizes my instrument of choice. My guitar is an iAxe393, from Behringer. This guitar has a USB output, and you can use a PC or Mac for an amp and effects (it has a regular output just like any other guitar too). To my untrained ears, it sounds ok for a begginer's guitar, though not as good as other guitars that are just as cheap (it cost me 117 dollars).

    According to my friend, the USB output "kills" the experience of playing a string instrument because they are analogic. While we agree on the physics involved, I don't have enough acoustic resolution in my inner ears to know whether the sound of a string is being treated by a computer or not prior to coming out of the speakers.

    So, TDWTF, my question is: does it really matter if you're plugging your guitar on a PC? Is outputting your signal to a PC worse, because it eliminates a fundamental aspect of the guitar? Is it better, since you have more control over filters and tuning? Or do you think it's neither, but just another way to play?

    [/quote]

    If you thought IT was full of annoying little geeks, go take a hike to harmony-central, thegearpage, etc, and ask this same question there. I bet your friend probably dwells around those places.

    The USB "kills" the analog experience?. So you don't even know how to play and your buddy is already polluting you with the "Quest for tone"?

    So what did your friend suggest instead of using USB? did he recomend to get a pocket Pod or a 5W Tube Amp?.

    If you want to connect to the computer I would reccomend to get a cheap analgo to digital interface (POD STUDIO GX) or even better forget the computer and just get a Pocket POD or similar. Plug your guitar and start wanking unearthly annoying noises from hell.

    In any case, whatever you do, please, for everyones sake, ALWAYS use headphones.

     

     



  • Agree with Fatdog, music geeks are the worst scum of the earth. Also the richest perhaps, not sure. Who else is buying all those gold plated cables?

    Anyway, I would say that you should just learn to play and have fun.  Other people can worry about the sound not being good enough.

    Also headphones. Next to the fact that you won't annoy your neighbours, it is probably cheaper to buy reasonably good sounding headphones then to buy a hifi set and all the crap to loop it to your computer.



  • [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]According to my friend, the USB output "kills" the experience of playing a string instrument because they are analogic. [/quote] 

    Ask the same question on hydrogenaudio.com and sit back as the wisdom enters your brain.

     +1 headphones. You don't want to subject the people around you to your atonal destruction of music as we know it.



  • Truth be told, I bought the iAxe more because of the possibility of plugging headphones directly to it than anything else.

    Thank you guys. And yeah, amongst the geeks I walk with, a handful of them are also musicians. I know how fierce a flame can be started if someone says something heretic close to one of them.



  • @fatdog said:

    If you thought IT was full of annoying little geeks, go take a hike to
    harmony-central, thegearpage, etc, and ask this same question there.
    I'd reccomend a visit to Denon's site. They have some awesome CAT5 cables for sale, along with other audiophile stuff. I seem to recall (and I'm sure someone will post links) to an Amazon review of similar cables.



  • [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]

    Having just finished Guitar Hero World Tour on Hard also made me wish to evolve to the next level.

    So I bought a real electric guitar, and I intend to enroll in a music school of some sort.

    [/quote] Funny, I did it the other way around. About 10 years ago I started playing the bass guitar but then I got married, moved to another city and lost contact with the members of my band. So I recently started playing Guitar Hero Metallica. I'm currently also in Hard mode but I can tell you: playing Metallica on a real guitar is a lot more difficult than in Guitar Hero. But Guitar Hero is a lot more fun 🙂 It basically offers the same thrill for less effort


  • @bjolling said:

    But Guitar Hero is a lot more fun 🙂 It basically offers the same thrill for less effort

    Really? more fun? You get high and drunk while playing Guitar hero? People (real people) roar and jump and mosh and sing your songs? And afterwards an ugly but busty blue haired chick gives you a blowjob and let's you cum on her mouth?

    Does she then stalk you for years?



  • @fatdog said:

    You get high and drunk while playing Guitar hero?

    Well, why not?  How else are you going to make it through a boring-ass game where you pathetically pretend to play an instrument?

     

    @fatdog said:

    People (real people) roar and jump and mosh and sing your songs?

    Do enough drugs, and you'll think they are.  And isn't escaping from harsh reality really what drugs and video games are all about?  Fuck reality.

     

    @fatdog said:

    And afterwards an ugly but busty blue haired chick gives you a blowjob and let's you cum on her mouth?

    What about an ugly but busty (and mini-nuke-obsessed) blue headed sketch?

     

    @fatdog said:

    Does she then stalk you for years?

    You should have just fucked her.  The disappointment afterwards will have her running for the exit.



  • @bjolling said:

    Funny, I did it the other way around. About 10 years ago I started playing the bass guitar but then I got married, moved to another city and lost contact with the members of my band. So I recently started playing Guitar Hero Metallica. I'm currently also in Hard mode but I can tell you: playing Metallica on a real guitar is a lot more difficult than in Guitar Hero. But Guitar Hero is a lot more fun 🙂 It basically offers the same thrill for less effort
    You should have become a roadie instead.  If its a smaller tour (2000 capacity or less) I easily make more than the band members.  When it comes to girls there are plenty to go around.  And they will often give you their "resume" so to speak.  On Larger tours its harder for the groupies to get access to the bands so they often end up going through a roadie first.  If anyones interested I'll start a thread and share some old road stories. 



  • @morbiuswilters said:

     

    @fatdog said:

    Does she then stalk you for years?

    You should have just fucked her.  The disappointment afterwards will have her running for the exit.

    Genious! They should teach that on Rock and Roll College.

     

    @galgorah said:

    If anyones interested I'll start a thread and share some old road stories. 

    Mmmm.. nope. Not really. IMO. Unless your stories involve a great deal of Spinal Tap moments, you better keep it to yourself, or go to harmony-central.

    I mean, who wants to hear to "The Roadie Stories"? You could have made more money and get more ass (dick) than the musicians, but you still are The Roadie. As in the guy that carries stuffs, picks up cables, slips on vomit, and breaks his back with the halfstacks. There is no glamour or glory on that. It's just a job.

    Do they tell stories about the water boy on the football team?
    Do they make movies about the soldier who writes letters to dead meat's moms?
    Does the guy who rents the tuxedo for the Prom King gets a shot at a story?
    Do you remember the name of any of Tony Montana's bodyguards?

     



  • @fatdog said:

    Mmmm.. nope. Not really. IMO. Unless your stories involve a great deal of Spinal Tap moments, you better keep it to yourself, or go to harmony-central.

    Every tour has spinal tap moments.  Thats what made the movie funny.

     

    @fatdog said:

    I mean, who wants to hear to "The Roadie Stories"? You could have made more money and get more ass (dick) than the musicians, but you still are The Roadie. As in the guy that carries stuffs, picks up cables, slips on vomit, and breaks his back with the halfstacks. There is no glamour or glory on that. It's just a job.

     They make books, movies, and even video games about roadie life.  For most musicians it's no picnic either, many of them also work as roadies for other bands.  It's only on the real high end tours that this changes.  We all get sick together, deal with the long hours together, etc Also I work as a tour manager so I'm more akin to the coach of a football team than to the waterboy. And no I don't break my back with halfstacks.  Thats what local crew are for.  They help the back line techs bring in the gear and usually take the real heavy items. 

     



  • @galgorah said:

    Bla bla bla

    You are still a roadie.

    No one remembers a roadie.

    Only roadies read or watch movies about roadies, that's like golf movies and fishing on TV (who the fuck plays a videogame about roadies? Do they have florist video games too?)

    Roadies are nobodies

    Roadies are the anonymous unsung heroes of rock and roll (without the glory or glamour of firemen, medics and soldiers.)

    Roadies are only a level above "local opening bands".

    Also it seems that roadies don't have sense of humour, or was that the Road Manager in you talking?



  • @fatdog said:

    You are still a roadie.
    No one remembers a roadie.
    not true. Every city I go to people remember my name.  Many of whom want to buy us drinks, talk for a while, etc.

     @fatdog said:


    Only roadies read or watch movies about roadies, that's like golf movies and fishing on TV (who the fuck plays a videogame about roadies? Do they have florist video games too?)
    Also not true.  Many people aspire, for some strange reason, to live the roadie life.  While I do agree that most of the public at a show only vaguely realizes we're there, People often ask us questions about the job. 

    @fatdog said:

    Roadies are nobodies
    Again Not true.  We Keep the entertainment machine running.  You wouldn't have the quality of show without us.  We know many many people in the entertainment industry.  And are very much appreciated for our work.  And While things do change depending on if its an arena tour, mid level (large club) tour, or a small travel in a van tour, The whole traveling show is basically family.

    @fatdog said:

    Roadies are the anonymous unsung heroes of rock and roll (without the glory or glamour of firemen, medics and soldiers.)
      Do a search on amazon for roadie and you will find lots of memoirs.  Also Brutal legend is a video game who main character is a roadie.

     @fatdog said:

    Roadies are only a level above "local opening bands".
    very incorrect.  Roadies are family, as in everyone else on the tour.  if a touring support band fucks up then myself or one of my roadies gets to chew them out.  basically it works like this.  headliner and their crew own the venue. Then down the line (as I specify). In the rider (which each promoter signs) it states that I have final say on all matters relating to the event (except for things like hall fees, ticket price, etc which are negotiated in the contract).   

    @fatdog said:


    Also it seems that roadies don't have sense of humour, or was that the Road Manager in you talking?

    TM most likely. 



  • @galgorah said:

    I work as a tour manager
     

    Isn't that a busy job? How do you have time for TDWTF shit?



  • @dhromed said:

    @galgorah said:

    I work as a tour manager
     

    Isn't that a busy job? How do you have time for TDWTF shit?

    It is. But I only tour 3 months out of the year and I only do the north american circuit.  The other 9 I have my day job as code monkey.  This way I can balance home life with touring.  I'm lucky enough to work for a company thats understanding enough to give me 3 months (unpaid) leave each year.  I used to tour relentlessly, but with my responsibilities It becomes hard to tour 9 or more months out of the year. It's a compromise 🙂


  • Now that's pretty cool.

    When I "tour", I mean walking around the wasteland, looking for lootz.



  • @galgorah said:

     Every city I go to people remember my name.  Many of whom want to buy us drinks, talk for a while, etc.
     

    Cool, so the memory of the great Roadie whose blood greased the rock and roll machine won't be forgotten. Good for you!

    @galgorah said:

    Many people aspire, for some strange reason, to live the roadie life.  While I do agree that most of the public at a show only vaguely realizes we're there, People often ask us questions about the job. 
     

    Yes I guess you listen to kid say stuff like:
    "Daddy, when I grow up I want to be a roadie"
    "Daddy, when I grow up I want to be a volleyball referee"
    "Daddy, when I grow up I want to be a city bus driver"
    "Daddy, when I grow up I want to be a hooker"
    "Daddy, when I grow up I want to be a consultant"

    @galgorah said:

    We Keep the entertainment machine running. 

    Answer 1: With blood, sweat and tears. Go Soldiers of Rock!
    Answer 2: I thought beer, sex and other drugs was what kept the entertainment machine running.


    @galgorah said:

    You wouldn't have the quality of show without us. 

    Sure, and you wouldn't have quality circus shows without the guys that feeds the elephant and cleans it's shit.

    @galgorah said:

    We know many many people in the entertainment industry.  And are very much appreciated for our work.  And While things do change depending on if its an arena tour, mid level (large club) tour, or a small travel in a van tour, The whole traveling show is basically family.

    Like the Carnies and Renaissance Fairs.

    @galgorah said:

    Do a search on amazon for roadie and you will find lots of memoirs. 

    Memoirs only read mainly by other Roadies. Just like this site is only read mostly by programmers, geeks and closeted fat vegan homosexuals.

    @galgorah said:

    Also Brutal legend is a video game who main character is a roadie.

    All right, and your point is? I mean did that game ever came out? Also, the main character might be a Roadie, but the game it's not about roadies, it's a guy fighting. You could make a game about a nurse, that goes into another dimension to kill giant bacteria, but I wouldn't call it a Nurse Game.

    @galgorah said:

    Roadies are family, as in everyone else on the tour.  if a touring support band fucks up then myself or one of my roadies gets to chew them out.  basically it works like this.  headliner and their crew own the venue. Then down the line (as I specify). In the rider (which each promoter signs) it states that I have final say on all matters relating to the event (except for things like hall fees, ticket price, etc which are negotiated in the contract).  

    Dude, I've been teasing you, but you are way to uptight about this. I know what a roadie does. I've worked as a Roadie, and I've been on the road as musician too. And Roadies are nobodies. Sure we all have drinks and drugs and dirty sex, and become friends and during the tour we are like a family (incestuous disfunctional one). Sure without roadies the show falls apart (not completely true in small bars tours), But the only moment of glory is when you are onstage making music. The rest is just a job.

    And sorry but nobody remember roadies, as nobody remember programmers, or nurses, or the waterboy. They might remember you on a town because you are friendly or whatever. But noone is going to ask your autograph, no one is going to have a picture of you on their room, nobody is going to come to you 15 years after a show and narrate you exactly how you played a show, that you had forgotten long ago. While in another Country where you have never been before, no one is going to recognize you on a bar and buy you beers for the rest of the night.
    You'll might have great memories, and great life experience (if that), but you will never have glory. Glory is for the ones onstage, the ones that get remembered. You are just a roadie. And roadies are nobody. (unless you start a blog and a twitter page).

    Also, dude, try to grow a sense of humour, at least you are not a drummer. (are you?).



  • @galgorah said:

    Also Brutal legend is a video game who main character is a roadie.
    I knew you were going to go here, but I hoped you wouldn't.  By your logic, plumber is the most notable profession of all, because, y'know, Mario.  But at the end of the day, a plumber's occupation still involves cleaning out shit pipes.



  • @fatdog said:

    Just like this site is only read mostly by programmers, geeks and closeted fat vegan homosexuals.
     

    HEY.

    I am not vegan!

     

     

    I am not fat either.



  • @dhromed said:

    I am not vegan!

    Admitting your problem is the first step to recovery.



  • @fatdog said:

    And sorry but nobody remember roadies, as nobody remember programmers
    That's not entirely true.  People remember computer programmers who threaten to make us their bitch, and invite us to suck it down.  This explains the posting strategy of morbiuswilters.



  • @bstorer said:

    @fatdog said:

    And sorry but nobody remember roadies, as nobody remember programmers
    That's not entirely true.  People remember computer programmers who threaten to make us their bitch, and invite us to suck it down.  This explains the posting strategy of morbiuswilters.

    Dying with slightly more prestige than a roadie..  now there's a feather for my cap.



  • [quote user="Renan "C#" Sousa"]

     does it really matter if you're plugging your guitar on a PC?[/quote] 

    I prefer a real amp, but at this early stage for you, it's irrelevant.   The iAxe393 is a cheap piece of crap, but that's also irrelevant.  Right now the most important thing is learning how to play.  Have fun.



  • I have often heard a nasty buzzing noise from audio devices connected via USBee.


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