This is some serious overheating.



  •  Screenie this time!

     On the other hand, from a different program ...

     

    I knew Canada was cold, but this is a little ridiculous.

     

     Both from my old computer. Very simple explanation:
    Only one temperature sensor.



  • Second one looks like a classical signed / unsigned problem in comparison to the first.



  •  Well, my XP box was extremely fussy about some things. It kept killing the video drivers about every time I installed a Windows Update, and sometimes the drivers would crash in the middle of something (not even something intensive like games, but something like surfing the internet) and turn the screen a whole bunch of funky colors. And I thought it may have been overheating which is why I checked those two programs. And apparently, my computer had melted into a puddle of silicon goop without me noticing.

     

    I've gotten rid of it now. Happily.



  •  Unconnected sensor inputs tend to have weird values, usually a large negative or positive number.

    The program obviously doesn't know the sensor setup on your computer, since it has a -12V supply showing -1.58V and your +3.3V  is way out of spec. if it is labelled right.



  •  Well, my motherboard was a weird one. When I looked it up it apparently only had one sensor and both IDE and SATA in it. Can't remember the exact model, though. The computer was from 2006 and the manufacturer is now bankrupt or something. 



  •  Since when is it unusual to have IDE and SATA on the same motherboard? Surely not in 2006 where SATA was still transitional technology, and even today any decent mobo has at least 1x floppy and 1x IDE connector. Macs, laptops and small factor PCs don't count :-p

     If you want a RWTF, check out some transitional mobos having both AGP and PCI Express slots, or those having modified "almost " AGP compatible slots like AGR etc.



  • I wonder how many different socket types have been put on one motherboard?

    My epox dual-socket-a board at home has: AGP 2/4x (the old voltage so it won't accept a 4/8x card), 3x 5V pci (two of which don't work properly), 2x 3.3V pci-x (one of which also doesn't work properly). It has 2x ide (ATA 100) + 1x floppy for storage, anda 4x sata pci card. The onboard non-working intel ethernet socket (100 Mbit pci ethernet card replaces it, but it won't accept a gigabit card) and only having usb 1.1 just tops it off.

    It's the most bust motherboard ever, but it's been my fileserver for five years now o.O.

    I've seen a board with a modem riser, an agp socket, pci sockets and an isa socket. Anyone able to beat four types of expansion card socket?



  • @C4I_Officer said:

     Since when is it unusual to have IDE and SATA on the same motherboard? Surely not in 2006 where SATA was still transitional technology, and even today any decent mobo has at least 1x floppy and 1x IDE connector. Macs, laptops and small factor PCs don't count :-p

     

     Well the part I found weird is that it was half and half.



  •  Well, I have an Asus K8V-X Socket 754 mobo from 2005, that one has just two SATA channels and two IDE connectors. Considering that most HDs and CD-ROMs on sale back then were IDE, it made sense. SATA HDs were the "new rage" so to speak, but non-IDE optical drives wouldn't become mainstream for some good 3-4 years yet. Plus new IDE HDs in non-diminutive capacities were still made, so there was no incentive to pepper the board with SATA connectors (also a chipset limitation).

    More slots? Hmm... I have worked on many Slot 1 and Socket 370 mobos with AGP, PCI and ISA slots plus modem riser. A few rare ones had an Adaptec onboard IDE controller with a grand total of FOUR onboard IDE connectors(!), two "normal" and two "UDMA-66" ones, plus some had dual SDRAM PC-100/133 and DDR-1 memory slots, and some older Pentium-1 class ones had dual 72-pin and SDRAM PC-66/100 slots. A particularly freakish mobo even allowed for mixed 72-pin and SDRAM operation!

    I also have a couple of Pentium-1 class mobos with a COAST connector (Cache-on-a-stick) that looks like a Slot 1 socket, and one with dual AT and ATX power connectors. Sure you can't beat that mobo that had a vacuum tube socket for its onboard sound, though... maybe a modem with a mechanical ringer.



  • @C4I_Officer said:

    A particularly freakish mobo even allowed for mixed 72-pin and SDRAM operation!
    Oh, god. More recent than that were system boards that allowed one to use either PC133 SDRAM or DDR SDRAM. On one model I saw, in order to switch from one to the other, you had to adjust a huge bank of 60+ jumpers. I tried to find a picture of it, but my Google-fu is failing me.



  • @snover said:

    Oh, god. More recent than that were system boards that allowed one to use either PC133 SDRAM or DDR SDRAM.

    I had one of those.  It was actually quite useful.  When my DDR stick went tits-up, I just swapped in a spare PC133 I had lying around while I waited for the new DDR I ordered to arrive.  This feature spared me 3 horrifically bleak days of interacting with humanity.  They should have put that on the box.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @snover said:

    Oh, god. More recent than that were system boards that allowed one to use either PC133 SDRAM or DDR SDRAM.

    I had one of those.  It was actually quite useful.  When my DDR stick went tits-up, I just swapped in a spare PC133 I had lying around while I waited for the new DDR I ordered to arrive.  This feature spared me 3 horrifically bleak days of interacting with humanity.  They should have put that on the box.

     

    Instead you spent the three days trying to get the huge bank of jumpers right?



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @snover said:

    Oh, god. More recent than that were system boards that allowed one to use either PC133 SDRAM or DDR SDRAM.

    I had one of those.  It was actually quite useful.  When my DDR stick went tits-up, I just swapped in a spare PC133 I had lying around while I waited for the new DDR I ordered to arrive.  This feature spared me 3 horrifically bleak days of interacting with humanity.  They should have put that on the box.

     

    Instead you spent the three days trying to get the huge bank of jumpers right?

    It wasn't the one with jumpers; it just automagically recognized whichever RAM slots were in use.  The ease-of-use allowed me to regain productivity immediately; within minutes I was back to ignoring my coding assignments and scouring the Internet for videos of cartoon characters having sex.  They should have put that on the box.



  •  Hey, I found a picture this time!




  •  @morbiuswilters said:

    They should have put that on the box.

    I feel a strong inclincation to produce part of the design for this fantastical box.



  • @snover said:

     Hey, I found a picture this time!
     

    Man, computer electronics pictures make me warm inside. :)



  • @C4I_Officer said:

    some older Pentium-1 class ones had dual 72-pin and SDRAM PC-66/100 slots.
    I have one of these somewhere - it has 4 72-pin and two 168-pin RAM sockets (also includes both AT and ATX power connectors). Has an IBM 5x86 233MHz CPU on it. I have no idea where I got it though.@snover said:
    On one model I saw, in order to switch from one to the other, you had to adjust a huge bank of 60+ jumpers.
    Had one of these, too, but sold it.



  • @dhromed said:

    Man, computer electronics pictures make me warm inside. :)

    And we're still making fun of furries.



  • @snover said:

     Hey, I found a picture this time!

     

    Is that a PCI-e x4 slot at the top left? If so, does a video card actually fit there? Seems like it would be practically flush with the bottom of the case.



  • @Someone You Know said:

    @snover said:

     Hey, I found a picture this time!

     

    Is that a PCI-e x4 slot at the top left? If so, does a video card actually fit there? Seems like it would be practically flush with the bottom of the case.

    No.



  • Actually, it's a CNR socket, not an AMR socket. There's also ACR sockets. Yes, they're stupid and I'm glad they're dead.



  • @Thief^ said:

    Actually, it's a CNR socket, not an AMR socket. There's also ACR sockets. Yes, they're stupid and I'm glad they're dead.

    I know.  I just figured it was easier to link to the AMR article since they're all about the same.



  • I'm still not really sure why they ever used them. The devices that used the cards were normally PCI bus chips anyway, so it would have been relatively simple to make a full blown pci card. Or just license someone else's and rebrand it as yours. etc etc.



  • @Thief^ said:

    I'm still not really sure why they ever used them. The devices that used the cards were normally PCI bus chips anyway, so it would have been relatively simple to make a full blown pci card. Or just license someone else's and rebrand it as yours. etc etc.

    AMR cards usually have no processing on-board, but offload that to the chipset.  The components that needed FCC certification were put on a separate card.  I'm pretty sure AMR cards won't necessarily work across chipsets/manufacturers, so it's not a universal slot like PCI and needed its own slot.



  • I meant that the onboard chips normally were pci chips, so they might as well have put them (plus the components from the AMR card) onto a full-blown pci card.

    Or just licensed an already-certified PCI card from someone else. Would probably have been cheaper than getting their own AMR card certified, and paying for the onboard components on every board.



  • @Thief^ said:

    I meant that the onboard chips normally were pci chips, so they might as well have put them (plus the components from the AMR card) onto a full-blown pci card.

    Or just licensed an already-certified PCI card from someone else. Would probably have been cheaper than getting their own AMR card certified, and paying for the onboard components on every board.

    I think it was cheaper to use the integrated motherboard components rather than having them on a separate card.   A lot of those AMR cards were god awful quality and off-loaded the processing to the CPU and chipset, which must have saved some money.  Otherwise, they surely would have just included a PCI card.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.