Daily Telegraph 'Pants on the Ground' racist related articles wtf



  • 'Related Articles'..... riiiight.

     



  •  Lame.



  •  Because... there's a racist stereotype that says Greek people like American Idol?



  •  I guess you didn't get the memo that racism is OK now. Harry Reid broke new ground.



  • OMG!!!1!!! LOZL!!! I CANNOT BELEIVE THAT PEOPLE OVERLOOK THE SPILT-PEA PURREE REFERENCE. O MAN, THAT IS SO RACITS!!



  • Notice to Americans: get over yourselves.  Your obsessions are not shared by the rest of the world.  The Daily Telegraph is a British publication.  I deduce from the existance of this thread that there is presumably some racist overtone to the word "chicken" in the USA, but it has no such connotations in Britain.



  • @Iago said:

    Notice to Americans: get over yourselves.  Your obsessions are not shared by the rest of the world.

    It's OK man, we did get over ourselves. We elected a black president. We tolerate racism now. It was only a few years ago when someone would lose their job for racist comments. Now, if you make racist comments, all of a sudden you have a lot of black friends. It's awesome.



  • The connotation is only for fried chicken, not chicken in general. The racist part comes from the stereotype that black people love fried chicken (and watermelon)



  • @bob171123 said:

    We elected a black president. We tolerate racism now.
    I thought Obama was half-white?



  • @Iago said:

    I deduce from the existance of this thread that there is presumably some racist overtone to the word "chicken" in the USA, but it has no such connotations in Britain.
    Google [australia kfc advert pulled] for some 'education.'



    For those that can't be bothered... KFC had to pull an ad only shown on AU televisions, because some people in America decided it was racist. To belabor the point, it was not shown (or at least not intended to be shown - dunno if Fox or whoever has shown it) in the US.



    From the first link at the time of posting:

    The commercial, featuring a white Australian cricket fan offering fried chicken to West Indies supporters, has been pulled from the air in Australia.

    [...]
    The Australian TV commercial was picked up by the US media, including the New York Daily News and Baltimore Sun, and drew heated debate, with some Americans accusing Australians of being racist because it perpetuates a stereotype that African Americans eat a lot of fried chicken.

    I'm quite unsure what to actually think of this....


  • @ObiWayneKenobi said:

    The connotation is only for fried chicken, not chicken in general. The racist part comes from the stereotype that black people love fried chicken (and watermelon)
    I don't understand how it is racist to state the plain fact that black people like fried chicken?   Hell, almost everyone likes fried chicken.



  • @PJH said:

    @bob171123 said:
    We elected a black president. We tolerate racism now.
    I thought Obama was half-white?
     

    I believe the term you're looking for is "light-skinned."



  • @tster said:

    @ObiWayneKenobi said:

    The connotation is only for fried chicken, not chicken in general. The racist part comes from the stereotype that black people love fried chicken (and watermelon)
    I don't understand how it is racist to state the plain fact that black people like fried chicken?   Hell, almost everyone likes fried chicken.

    It's about context and history.  The stereotype of black people liking fried chicken has a history of being used in a negative manner.  I'm hardly a big fan of Political Correctness and I think this country is nuts when it comes to race, although I also think we're a better than we get credit for.  Most nations don't have race problems because they don't have much diversity and when they do, it's often a modern thing, the result of people leaving their native lands to seek out opportunity.  On the other hand, America has a lot of diversity and a troubled history of race relations.  I don't think that's because we're inherently racist or anything, after all the British, Dutch and French were the ones who started the slave trade.  But we ended up having to live with the results and we weren't able to jump straight from racism to equality.  We had a long, hard road where we had to come to terms with race relations.

     

    So why is the stereotype unseemly?  Because it has a history of being associated with racism.  From a purely objective standpoint, that may seem like a silly reason to make a factual observation off-limits, but we society is subjective.  Most people would find it rude and anti-social to make a comment about somebody being overweight or poor or unattractive, no matter how true it might be.  It's simple politeness.  And many blacks find it rude to be told what they like, even if it's meant in a harmless manner.  Like it or not, there is still a lot of baggage in relations between blacks and whites.  It's lessening and it's hardly a problem like it used to be, but it takes time.  I'm fairly young, so the racial sensitivity seems less sensible to me than it does to someone older.  But remember, a mere 45 years ago blacks were still being denied the right to vote in many areas and were being lynched or shot for trying to live their lives.  45 years.  That's within many people's lifetimes.  So, there is still tension and a lot of anger and bad feelings.  And, if black people see that stereotype as being unpleasant and offensive, then I will respect that the best I can.  Because that is the polite thing to do and human relations are often complex and often aren't based as much on pure logic as they are on emotion and history.

     

    That doesn't mean I don't think there are still problems with race.  I think things like affirmative action and the welfare state are harmful in the long run.  I think modern American liberalism is often condescending and paternalistic to blacks, which just strikes me as another form of well-intentioned, but still dead wrong, racism.  Things will change.  Future generations will care less about the sins and the pain of the past.  Being offended by this kind of thing will become uncool and antiquated.  But even with all the progress we've made in 45 years (and it's been a hell of a lot), we still must be mindful that certain truths are better left unsaid.  Of course, it's a complex thing.  Black comedians have been quite successful in turning those pockets of uncomfortable thoughts into laughter.  I think that's a very good sign.  Still, respect is the cornerstone of successful societies and relationships.  Sometimes that means respecting taboos, even if they seem illogical to us.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @tster said:

    @ObiWayneKenobi said:

    The connotation is only for fried chicken, not chicken in general. The racist part comes from the stereotype that black people love fried chicken (and watermelon)
    I don't understand how it is racist to state the plain fact that black people like fried chicken?   Hell, almost everyone likes fried chicken.

    tl;don't care
    Looks like somebody ran out of booze money for the month and has nothing better to do on a Saturday night...



  • @tster said:

    @ObiWayneKenobi said:

    The connotation is only for fried chicken, not chicken in general. The racist part comes from the stereotype that black people love fried chicken (and watermelon)
    I don't understand how it is racist to state the plain fact that black people like fried chicken?   Hell, almost everyone likes fried chicken.

     

    Reminds me of a Dave Chapelle show where he comments on how the restaurant employees knew as soon as he walked through the door that he wanted fried chicken. "All these years, I thought I liked chicken because it was delicious. Turns out I'm genetically predisposed to liking chicken!"



  • @bob171123 said:

    @tster said:

    @ObiWayneKenobi said:

    The connotation is only for fried chicken, not chicken in general. The racist part comes from the stereotype that black people love fried chicken (and watermelon)
    I don't understand how it is racist to state the plain fact that black people like fried chicken?   Hell, almost everyone likes fried chicken.

     

    Reminds me of a Dave Chapelle show where he comments on how the restaurant employees knew as soon as he walked through the door that he wanted fried chicken. "All these years, I thought I liked chicken because it was delicious. Turns out I'm genetically predisposed to liking chicken!"

    It all adds up in the end though.  Turns out chickens are genetically predisposed to taste great!

     



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @tster said:

    @ObiWayneKenobi said:

    The connotation is only for fried chicken, not chicken in general. The racist part comes from the stereotype that black people love fried chicken (and watermelon)
    I don't understand how it is racist to state the plain fact that black people like fried chicken?   Hell, almost everyone likes fried chicken.

    But remember, a mere 45 years ago blacks were still being denied the right to vote in many areas and were being lynched or shot for trying to live their lives.  45 years.  That's within many people's lifetimes.
     

    I think you are pushing the truth a little here.  There weren't many lynchings in the 50s or 60s.  So it's been about 60 years.  Still not a long time, but it is the difference between a 60 year olds remembering lynchings and a 75 year olds remembing them, which makes a bigger difference since the 60 year oldsand still in the workforce in great numbers.



  • @tster said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @tster said:

    @ObiWayneKenobi said:

    The connotation is only for fried chicken, not chicken in general. The racist part comes from the stereotype that black people love fried chicken (and watermelon)
    I don't understand how it is racist to state the plain fact that black people like fried chicken?   Hell, almost everyone likes fried chicken.

    But remember, a mere 45 years ago blacks were still being denied the right to vote in many areas and were being lynched or shot for trying to live their lives.  45 years.  That's within many people's lifetimes.
     

    I think you are pushing the truth a little here.  There weren't many lynchings in the 50s or 60s.  So it's been about 60 years.  Still not a long time, but it is the difference between a 60 year olds remembering lynchings and a 75 year olds remembing them, which makes a bigger difference since the 60 year oldsand still in the workforce in great numbers.

    The point wasn't that there "weren't many" but that there were any at all.  The mid-60s were still very discriminatory.  There was a lot of pushback against integration, targeted killings of black leaders and civil rights leaders, systematic disenfranchisement, mass violence and intimidation.  In 1969 in Cairo, Illinois (somewhat near where I grew up) a black GI on temporary leave from Vietnam was lynched.  In the office of the sheriff.  The deep south was even worse.  It was domestic terrorism and it happened within the lifetimes of my parents.  The battle flag of the CSA still flies over a couple of state capitol buildings.



  • @bstorer said:

    Looks like somebody ran out of booze money for the month and has nothing better to do on a Saturday night...

    That's a racist stereotype.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Like it or not, there is still a lot of baggage in relations between blacks and whites.
    I basically agree with what you said, but I'd also note that there is an industry that has emerged solely to find 'offensive' things to complain about, and keep the specter of racism around.  Many of the guilty here were begun in the Civil Rights era 40-60 (some even more) years ago. 

    It's essentially institutional inertia.  As progress against racism was made, they had to look harder and harder to find racism to fight, otherwise they'd have no reason to exist.  The fact that they've turned their eyes to Australian TV commercials just proves that they don't have enough to do at home.

     Then again, there is the Streisand effect.  In many ways, these groups do more to keep stereotypes alive than actual racists.

     

     



  • @boomzilla said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Like it or not, there is still a lot of baggage in relations between blacks and whites.
    I basically agree with what you said, but I'd also note that there is an industry that has emerged solely to find 'offensive' things to complain about, and keep the specter of racism around.  Many of the guilty here were begun in the Civil Rights era 40-60 (some even more) years ago. 

    It's essentially institutional inertia.  As progress against racism was made, they had to look harder and harder to find racism to fight, otherwise they'd have no reason to exist.  The fact that they've turned their eyes to Australian TV commercials just proves that they don't have enough to do at home.

    Then again, there is the Streisand effect.  In many ways, these groups do more to keep stereotypes alive than actual racists.

    Agreed.  I think it's pretty clear that people like Al Sharpton are race-baiting demagogues who feed conflict to solidify power and wealth for themselves.  Then again, I think most people realize Al Sharpton is a fraud and he does such a great job of being a living parody of racial hucksterism and opening people's eyes, that, ironically, he may do more good than harm.



  • I still don't get it.  Yes, it could be considered racist to suggest that "all black people like fried chicken".  But how is it 'racist' for a "Greek lemon and oregano chicken" recipe to be considered related to an article that happens to be about a black person? Sure, I can't see the connection myself, but I can't see the connection to "Britain's theme parks: a summer guide" either.  Or is that racist too - all those black people without jobs who have time to go theme parks?

    Come to think of it, it is slightly ironic that the recipe in question is for "Greek" chicken - is it not as offensive to imply that all Greek people like lemon and oregano chicken?  (Yes, I realise that is not implied and it doesn't have the same history. I do mean to be ridiculous)



  • @Mel said:

    I still don't get it.  Yes, it could be considered racist to suggest that "all black people like fried chicken".  But how is it 'racist' for a "Greek lemon and oregano chicken" recipe to be considered related to an article that happens to be about a black person? Sure, I can't see the connection myself, but I can't see the connection to "Britain's theme parks: a summer guide" either.  Or is that racist too - all those black people without jobs who have time to go theme parks?

    Come to think of it, it is slightly ironic that the recipe in question is for "Greek" chicken - is it not as offensive to imply that all Greek people like lemon and oregano chicken?  (Yes, I realise that is not implied and it doesn't have the same history. I do mean to be ridiculous)

    I was referring to the fried chicken stereotype.  The lemon and oregano chicken thing was a lame attempt by the OP to make a semi-racial joke.  It falls flat on its face.  Hence my first comment.



  • @Iago said:

    Notice to Americans: get over yourselves.  Your obsessions are not shared by the rest of the world.  The Daily Telegraph is a British publication.  I deduce from the existance of this thread that there is presumably some racist overtone to the word "chicken" in the USA, but it has no such connotations in Britain.

     

    Note to British assholes:

    Don't stereotype all Americans based on one kook's strange idea of "racism." No reasonable American would consider that related article suggestion racist.

    Maybe if it were fried chicken, maybe... but even then still not.



  • @PJH said:

    Google [australia kfc advert pulled] for some 'education.'



    For those that can't be bothered... KFC had to pull an ad only shown on AU televisions, because some people in America decided it was racist. To belabor the point, it was not shown (or at least not intended to be shown - dunno if Fox or whoever has shown it) in the US.



    From the first link at the time of posting:

    The commercial, featuring a white Australian cricket fan offering fried chicken to West Indies supporters, has been pulled from the air in Australia.

    [...]
    The Australian TV commercial was picked up by the US media, including the New York Daily News and Baltimore Sun, and drew heated debate, with some Americans accusing Australians of being racist because it perpetuates a stereotype that African Americans eat a lot of fried chicken.

    I'm quite unsure what to actually think of this....
     

    Australia is full of pussies who won't stand up for themselves? That also explains why their pansy-ass government keeps censoring their internet and not letting Australian adults buy mature video games.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Don't stereotype all Americans based on one kook's strange idea of "racism." No reasonable American would consider that related article suggestion racist.

     

    Agreed.  I had to re-read the OP and the first few responses multiple times before I even figured out where was the sudden jump from a random article suggestion on a lousy TV show to a racism discussion in all of its internet-y glory.

    ...And this right after listening to a wonderful Martin Luther King Jr. tribute on NPR.  sigh



  • @PJH said:

    @Iago said:
    I deduce from the existance of this thread that there is presumably some racist overtone to the word "chicken" in the USA, but it has no such connotations in Britain.
    Google [australia kfc advert pulled] for some 'education.'



    For those that can't be bothered... KFC had to pull an ad only shown on AU televisions, because some people in America decided it was racist. To belabor the point, it was not shown (or at least not intended to be shown - dunno if Fox or whoever has shown it) in the US.



    From the first link at the time of posting:

    The commercial, featuring a white Australian cricket fan offering fried chicken to West Indies supporters, has been pulled from the air in Australia.

    [...]
    The Australian TV commercial was picked up by the US media, including the New York Daily News and Baltimore Sun, and drew heated debate, with some Americans accusing Australians of being racist because it perpetuates a stereotype that African Americans eat a lot of fried chicken.

    I'm quite unsure what to actually think of this....
     

    Considering it was in context - the West Indians were in the country playing cricket and the white guy was distracting the fans from cheering for their team. If the Poms were over it probably would have been the guy distracting the Barmy Army - would that have been "racist"? There are other KFC ads where the same guy attacts a player (using a KFC wrap thing) for his autograph, or buys his friends chicken for helping him concrete his yard (so they can play backyard cricket without getting bindiis in their feet), or even steals food from the guy sitting next to him (he was too busy looking at his KFC food to notice a cricket ball hitting him in the head).

    I think it was worse because of the recent(ish) blackface Red Faces segment on Hey Hey it's Saturday. That incident has created lots of jokes against Harry Connick Jr. :)

     


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.