Read/Write windows file metadata



  •  Is it possible to read/write metadata stored in files under the windows
    os? (The data you can reach by right clicking a file in Windows and
    choosing properties)?






  • In fact the (currently) first match looks suspiciously like your post.



  •  At what point did this place become a f***ing help forum?



  • @seconddevil said:

     At what point did this place become a f***ing help forum?

    http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/19.aspx



  •  My bad. I take it back



  • @PJH said:

    @seconddevil said:

     At what point did this place become a f***ing help forum?

    http://forums.thedailywtf.com/forums/19.aspx

    This place, however, is not that forum.



  • What I really found funny is that noone realised that the OP wasn't actually asking a legitimate question, he was attempting to pose SPAM as a question. Re read the OP and notice the link under the question, which completely unrelated to the question.



  • @Hitsuji said:

    What I really found funny is that noone realised that the OP wasn't actually asking a legitimate question, he was attempting to pose SPAM as a question. Re read the OP and notice the link under the question, which completely unrelated to the question.
     

    The link in OP's signature has been removed. If it reappears, OP will be banned.

     

    BTW, thread moved to "Coding Related Help & Questions".



  • @Hitsuji said:

    What I really found funny is that noone realised that the OP wasn't actually asking a legitimate question, he was attempting to pose SPAM as a question. Re read the OP and notice the link under the question, which completely unrelated to the question.

    That's unfortunate because I was looking forward to the replies. I only know it's stored in a separate stream in the filesystem. I suppose Google will help me if I ever need to access it



  • @bjolling said:

    @Hitsuji said:

    What I really found funny is that noone realised that the OP wasn't actually asking a legitimate question, he was attempting to pose SPAM as a question. Re read the OP and notice the link under the question, which completely unrelated to the question.

    That's unfortunate because I was looking forward to the replies. I only know it's stored in a separate stream in the filesystem. I suppose Google will help me if I ever need to access it

     

     

    An Alternate Data Stream by the name of DocumentSummaryInformation; there are some other alternate streams that are common, like "ZoneIdentifier... and if course $DATA, where the standard file data goes.

     

    Oh... but the question was how to access it... that's a tad more difficult.The "Easy" way is with Vista or later's FindFirstStreamW and FindNextStreamW functions; with older NT OS's you need to resort to either BackupRead, or, when backup privileges aren't available, NTQueryInformationFile.

     

     



  • @ammoQ said:

    @Hitsuji said:

    What I really found funny is that noone realised that the OP wasn't actually asking a legitimate question, he was attempting to pose SPAM as a question. Re read the OP and notice the link under the question, which completely unrelated to the question.
     

    The link in OP's signature has been removed. If it reappears, OP will be banned.

     

    BTW, thread moved to "Coding Related Help & Questions".

    Well, the signature has reappeared...



  • @bjolling said:

    Well, the signature has reappeared...
     

    OP banned & renamed



  • @bjolling said:

    @Hitsuji said:

    What I really found funny is that noone realised that the OP wasn't actually asking a legitimate question, he was attempting to pose SPAM as a question. Re read the OP and notice the link under the question, which completely unrelated to the question.

    That's unfortunate because I was looking forward to the replies. I only know it's stored in a separate stream in the filesystem. I suppose Google will help me if I ever need to access it

     

    Some file formats (mp3, doc, docx, etc.) specify a means to save metadata within the file instead of in an alternate stream.  Microsoft recommends doing this when defining new file formats so as to avoid relying on the filesystem supporting alternate streams.  


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