Very heavy packaging



  •  i bought this nettop:

    http://www.monclick.it/schede/prodotto.asp?codice=92.NVEYZ.INN

     And I noticed a strange thing about its weight...


    Translation.

    Weight without packaging: 0.3 kg

    Weight with packaging: 16 kg

    When I took it home it barely reached 2 kg.



  • Eh. Sounds like someone just mistyped 1,6 kg.



  • Call the seller and complain.  The miserly bastards probably sent it to you in a cheap cardboard box instead of the 3/4" plate steel case it should've come in.



  • @vyznev said:

    Call the seller and complain.  The miserly bastards probably sent it to you in a cheap cardboard box instead of the 3/4" plate steel case it should've come in.
    Dammit, international shipping guidelines require such objects to be encased in lead plate for a reason.



  •  It was encased in ice.



  • @dhromed said:

     It was encased in ice.

    The simplest solutions are often the best.



  • Just the standard "round up to the next multiple of 16" method of calculating weights so they can screw you on shipping charges.



  • When I tried to view the image, it gave me one of those scamware popups (Antispy Live Scam).



  • @BlueKnot said:

    @dhromed said:

     It was encased in ice.

    The simplest solutions are often the best.
    If "encased in ice" is now a simple solution, I think I want off of this planet.



  • @bstorer said:

    If "encased in ice" is now a simple solution, I think I want off of this planet.

    Are you saying that the planet itself has shown us high technology with its packaging of various (usually dead) creatures in ice and then moving them around, usually with glacial slowness?  Because if that's true, then I'm apparently confused at the concept of high tech.

    Of course, if one lives near the equator, sufficient quantities of ice may not be readily available at any time - it's more of a polar packaging solution.



  • @Vempele said:

    When I tried to view the image, it gave me one of those scamware popups (Antispy Live Scam).

     

     

    Sorry for this, I'm using adblock and I don't see anything except the relevant page.



  • @tgape said:

    Are you saying that the planet itself has shown us high technology with its packaging of various (usually dead) creatures in ice and then moving them around, usually with glacial slowness?  Because if that's true, then I'm apparently confused at the concept of high tech.
    On a semi-serious note, I actually would regard that as high tech.  While it may be simple for nature to do, we lack the ability or technology to accomplish it.



  • @bstorer said:

    @tgape said:

    Are you saying that the planet itself has shown us high technology with its packaging of various (usually dead) creatures in ice and then moving them around, usually with glacial slowness?  Because if that's true, then I'm apparently confused at the concept of high tech.
    On a semi-serious note, I actually would regard that as high tech.  While it may be simple for nature to do, we lack the ability or technology to accomplish it.

    It depends on where you live.  If you live in Alaska, Canada, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway, Scandinavia, or Siberia, most of the year, it's quite easy to leverage nature's gifts to accomplish this.  Admittedly, as mentioned, nature's methods perform the transport portion rather slowly, and one generally doesn't have much control over where or when the product arrives at its destination.  However, it's not too difficult to pick up the product after it has been packaged, put it on a truck, and ship it - hopefully before the ice fully melts, otherwise the whole 'encasing in ice' part of the process was rather useless.

    Of course, thanks to the work of Ben Franklin, Michael Faraday, Willis Carrier and, more recently, whoever came up with 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, we actually *do* have the technology to pull this off anywhere on the planet.  Not, admittedly, in a manner as energy-efficient as one might like.

    But, considering that Ben Franklin was able to, at least in theory, pull this off, I wouldn't exactly say it is "high" technology even for Nairobi (random place where it's really hot most of the time).


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