Learning enterprisey Java



  • I may have a Java job in the pipeline (long story) and if I do get it, I need to get up to speed on enterprisey Java. I've mainly worked in C++, Delphi and C# and as such I haven't been exposed to all the different Java (what sham I callit) frameworks/platforms/whatnot like struts, Hibernate, Tomcat etc. I have done some work in Java previously so I know the basics and I was also tasked with maintaining a J2EE invoice application at a previous job so I've seen a fair bit of fairly advanced Java. I have, however, not written too much of it.

    Sorry for the rambling, but my question then is: can anyone recommend some good books that might get me fairly up to speed? They don't have to be basic since I have worked as a developer for a few years and I know all the basic constructs etc, but rather something that's about getting from basic/intermediate to erm.. enterprisey.

    If I do land the job I will probably be able to dedicate about a month or so on my own (full time since I'm a freelancer and choose my own schedule :) to hone my skillz.

     Anyhoo, all help is good help! The best suggestions get awarded a PaulaBean.

     



  •  It depends entirely on what technologies they actually use.  A JSF book does you no good if they don't use it.



  • @bstorer said:

     It depends entirely on what technologies they actually use.  A JSF book does you no good if they don't use it.

    Good question. I know that their main product is a mammoth CMS/workflow management/wiki/facebook for enterprise webapp running on top of Oracle. That's basically all I know. I know it was a shot in the dark anyhow. So, any good Java books in general then?

     

    Thanks!



  • @scandoman said:

    Good question. I know that their main product is a mammoth CMS/workflow management/wiki/facebook for enterprise webapp running on top of Oracle. That's basically all I know. I know it was a shot in the dark anyhow. So, any good Java books in general then?

    Thanks!

     

    The Spring Framework is pretty ubiquitous, so it's worth reading up on. Rod Johnson, who created the framework, wrote a book called "Expert One-on-One J2EE Design and Development" which is a few years old but might be worth reading.

    As for presentation frameworks, as bstorer pointed out there are literally hundreds. If you can find out which one you will be using than you will be able to focus your efforts - it would probably be a waste otherwise.

    It might be worthwhile reading up on 'standard' J2EE though. All Java web frameworks are built on top of it to some degree and getting a feel for the plumbing (how Servlets, web.xml and the like work) will stand you in good stead.


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