Birthdate entry - not so unusual...



  • ... but somewhat amusing, nonetheless.

    Birthdate WTF



  •  Would that be 256 years ago?



  • @TGV said:

     Would that be 256 years ago?


    1753 is the first full year after Britain (and by extension, the American colonies) adopted the Gregorian calendar. Because of this, it's the first year that can be represented as a DateTime in SQL Server.



  • @Carnildo said:

    @TGV said:

     Would that be 256 years ago?


    1753 is the first full year after Britain (and by extension, the American colonies) adopted the Gregorian calendar. Because of this, it's the first year that can be represented as a DateTime in SQL Server.
     




  • @Carnildo said:

    @TGV said:

     Would that be 256 years ago?


    1753 is the first full year after Britain (and by extension, the American colonies) adopted the Gregorian calendar. Because of this, it's the first year that can be represented as a DateTime in SQL Server.

    And that is 256 years ago. LET'S CELEBRATE the 0.25 kyear anniversary of a wise decision by the British to adopt a foreign standard. It'll take presumable the remaining .75 kyears before they'll adopt SI units, but ok, let's not rush things.



  • @TGV said:

    And that is 256 years ago. LET'S CELEBRATE the 0.25 kyear anniversary of a wise decision by the British to adopt a foreign standard. It'll take presumable the remaining .75 kyears before they'll adopt SI units, but ok, let's not rush things.

    Speaking of units, shouldn't that be 0.25 Kiyear anniversary?



  • @TGV said:

    And that is 256 years ago. LET'S CELEBRATE the 0.25 kyear anniversary
    kiYear shirley?



  • @TGV said:

    @Carnildo said:

    @TGV said:

     Would that be 256 years ago?


    1753 is the first full year after Britain (and by extension, the American colonies) adopted the Gregorian calendar. Because of this, it's the first year that can be represented as a DateTime in SQL Server.

    And that is 256 years ago. LET'S CELEBRATE the 0.25 kyear anniversary of a wise decision by the British to adopt a foreign standard. It'll take presumable the remaining .75 kyears before they'll adopt SI units, but ok, let's not rush things.

    Um, we do use SI for most things, except transport mileage, fuel quantity, and of course beer. You must be thinking of another English-speaking country.



  • @SenTree said:

    Um, we do use SI for most things, except transport mileage, fuel quantity, and of course beer.
    Did you mean fuel efficiency? (mpg) I've never used a petrol station that delivers in gallons here since I've started driving.

    @SenTree said:

    You must be thinking of another English-speaking country.
    Well I was thinking that myself in my last reply, since I'd recently been to another English speaking country, and found myself having to mentally convert the TV Weather reports (and the hotel room thermostat) into Celcius.



  • @PJH said:

    @SenTree said:

    Um, we do use SI for most things, except transport mileage, fuel quantity, and of course beer.
    Did you mean fuel efficiency? (mpg) I've never used a petrol station that delivers in gallons here since I've started driving.

    Damn this senility ! I should have noticed, especially since I filled up the car last night. Of course, when I started driving, we did use gallons.



  • @SenTree said:

    Um, we do use SI for most things, except transport mileage, fuel quantity, and of course beer. You must be thinking of another English-speaking country.

     

    I was thinking of Wales. No, ok, bad joke, but distance (miles, yards, feet, inches, furlong), weight (ounce, lbs, stone), volume (pint, fluid ounce, Jordan cup size), are still in common use, innit? That most packaging also contains a metric quantity was probably enforced by the European Community (French and Germans, good heavens) and is ignored with a stiff upper lip. But last time I ordered a pint of lager, the landlord charged me two shilling and tuppance.



  • @PJH said:

    found myself having to mentally convert the TV Weather reports (and the hotel room thermostat) into Celcius.

    I gave up on that. I know that 50 is chilly, 60 so so, 70 normal, 80 warm, 90 hot, 100 fucking hot.

     



  • @alegr said:

    I gave up on that. I know that 50 is chilly, 60 so so, 70 normal, 80 warm, 90 hot, 100 fucking hot.

     In other words, you're fluent. Fluent speakers of a second language don't translate between language in their head, they just comprehend the other language natively. Sounds like you've achieved native comprehension of Fahrenheit. Bravo.

     



  • @alegr said:

    @PJH said:

    found myself having to mentally convert the TV Weather reports (and the hotel room thermostat) into Celcius.

    I gave up on that. I know that 50 is chilly, 60 so so, 70 normal, 80 warm, 90 hot, 100 fucking hot.

     

    The way to remember the Fahrenheit scale is that 0 is fucking cold, 100 is fucking hot, and 50 is the dividing point between "wear extra clothes when exercising" and "take off extra clothes when exercising".


  •  In metric parts of Yurop we use number of liters per 100km to describe fuel efficiency. I know it lacks in elegance, but once you know that 5 is great, 8 is so-so and 15 is "you must be driving a Hummer", it's not as bad as it looks. On the other hand, the MPG is completely unknown here, and I can't tell whether 55MPG is ok or not without having to convert it to l/km.

     



  • @PJH said:

    @SenTree said:

    Um, we do use SI for most things, except transport mileage, fuel quantity, and of course beer.
    Did you mean fuel efficiency? (mpg) I've never used a petrol station that delivers in gallons here since I've started driving.

    @SenTree said:

    You must be thinking of another English-speaking country.
    Well I was thinking that myself in my last reply, since I'd recently been to another English speaking country, and found myself having to mentally convert the TV Weather reports (and the hotel room thermostat) into Celcius.

     

    Unless I am mistaken, Celsius is a metric measurement.  The SI measurement for temperature is Kelvin.



  • @tster said:

    Unless I am mistaken, Celsius is a metric measurement.  The SI measurement for temperature is Kelvin.
    That doesn't matter a lot since the degrees Celsius and the Kelvin are on the same scale. So a temperature difference of 10 °C is the same as a temperature difference of 10K. For all energy calculations where you have a temperature as the driving force, you never need to convert between the two (adding or subtracting 273,15)



  • @Kiss me I'm Polish said:

    On the other hand, the MPG is completely unknown here, and I can't tell whether 55MPG is ok or not without having to convert it to l/km.
     

    For me the bigger problem with the "gallon" is the fact that US and UK gallons are different (and a few other imperial vs US versions of old units) and it isn't always immediately apparent which one was used.


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