Deadlines


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    It's Tuesday morning. I'm in a meeting with some important people regarding the bring-up timeline for the application I'm "maintaining" (read: Making it work).

    One of them mentions that one division needs their portion by THIS COMING WEEKEND. I hadn't planned on having that portion of the application working for another month and a half.

    A quick phonecall to the director of that division says "Yes, that event is coming up this weekend."

    I then proceed to work 33 of the next 48 hours. It is now Thursday morning and I am roughly 25% done with emergency-hacking the stuff I need. I then call the director of that division to clarify some information. She's been injured in a car accident, and the next person down the chain of command fields my question instead. They answer, and then ask "but why do you care? We're using our old system anyway."

     

    So here I sit - sleep deprived (I didn't sleep Monday into Tuesday either - I'd stayed up and planned to go to bed after the meeting, but that got killed for the hackfest that followed), dirty, hungry (I've not eaten), sweaty (my office hits 90 degrees during the day on cool days - we've had some over-100 days lately), and tired. I don't know who to blame or even what to think. I've accomplished feats of coding that  I hadn't believed possible. I've activated alpha-quality features all over the god damned production system to prepare for this thing. I've compromised security features intentionally. All I could actually think to do was call a friend and say "Beer. Girls. Fried food. Tonight. Make arrangements."

     

     



  • @Weng said:

    All I could actually think to do was call a friend and say "Beer. Girls. Fried food. Tonight. Make arrangements."

     

     

    Looks like a reasonable plan to me.

    Best wishes.



  •  And for Monday morning?  Guns.  Lots of guns.



  •  Wow, that sucks.  I feel for you.

    My problems aren't quite so severe... I got an e-mail yesterday saying "I need you to meet with X tomorrow to take over their production system by this weekend."  It doesn't look too complicated, but I don't want to get my hopes up...



  • TRWTFs are lack of air conditioning and that you've still been making regular posts to the forum.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    TRWTFs are lack of air conditioning and that you've still been making regular posts to the forum.

     

    He needs to keep his (in?)sanity.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    TRWTFs are lack of air conditioning and that you've still been making regular posts to the forum.

    Given the temperature info, I'm going to wager a guess that he's in the Seattle area. Air conditioners here are a waste of money 9/10 years... then the 10th year comes along, and everybody's dying of heat. Larger buildings and most vehicles are taken care of, but single family homes and small offices are usually unbearable.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @blakeyrat said:

    Given the temperature info, I'm going to wager a guess that he's in the Seattle area.
    Baltimore area.

     

    I've actually been posting to the forum MORE often lately - which is a direct result of being attached to my desk with handcuffs and occasionally needing to tab down Visual Studio for a reality check.



  •  No kidding, blakeyrat.  This week has been brutal.  What's worse, my fan died a few weeks ago, so I didn't even have that luxury.



  •  how about suck it up and carry on as you were?



  • @Weng said:

    @blakeyrat said:
    Given the temperature info, I'm going to wager a guess that he's in the Seattle area.
    Baltimore area.

    checks weather.com for Baltimore

     

    Huh, I figured Baltimore would be hotter than that.  I must be a real pussy, though, because even though it rarely tops 80 here I run A/C at home and in the car.  I know there are some people around here who go all summer without A/C in their home but those people are psychotics.



  •  Reminds me of the time a VIP needed a custom script developed by Friday morning.  He told the Department Head who decided that in order to be sure we make the deadline he would subtract one day from the due date, and passed it on to the Development Manager.  He decided that in order to be sure we make the deadline he would subtract one day from the due date, and assigned it to me.  So Tuesday morning I am given a complex task with very vague requirements and it is due the next day.  By the time I get the requirements straightened out, it is 5:00 PM.  So I stay up most of night coding and testing and manage to finish in time to go home and grab a few hours sleep.  I present the script to the VIP at 11:00 am Wednesday, and that is when I find out he did not need it until Friday.

      Yeah, I know it is not a very interesting story, but it still bugs me.

    -  D



  •  The client generaly doesn't know the workload needed for a feature to be implemented. It's you job to say them it's planned for the next two month, it's not possible before because it requires other features which are not yet completed. Better learn to say "no"

     @Weng said:

    All I could actually think to do was call a friend and say "Beer. Girls. Fried food. Tonight. Make arrangements."

     

     Grea idea, putting another deadline to another person that had not planned it :D



  • @Weng said:

    Beer. Girls. Fried food. Fresh food. Tonight. Make arrangements.
     

    FTFY

    A rich meal made by someone else is way more satisfying than greasy fried shit.

    Also, get [1...n] girls to successively apply a lap dance to your person.



  •  I hope that job pays, cause, godamn, I wouldn't tolerate even half of that. And seriously... no AC? It's 2009, wtf are they thinking?



  • @DOA said:

    I hope that job pays
    It does, but they always pay late. [/in-joke]



  • @blakeyrat said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    TRWTFs are lack of air conditioning and that you've still been making regular posts to the forum.

    Given the temperature info, I'm going to wager a guess that he's in the Seattle area. Air conditioners here are a waste of money 9/10 years... then the 10th year comes along, and everybody's dying of heat. Larger buildings and most vehicles are taken care of, but single family homes and small offices are usually unbearable.

     

    He might also be in a building that has air conditioning but really shitty ductwork. Our floor at work always gets shortchanged on the cool air, while down below us it feels like a crisp fall day.  In July.

    Also in the "seasonal WTF" category: my section of the cube farm frequently hits 80-85 degrees in winter.  And this is western New York, which does not exactly have warm winters.  My first winter here I spent way too much time bitching about the heat and was told "it's an old building, this happens."  Ok, fine.  Next winter I find out that facilities keeps the heat around 75 F all winter.

    My theory is, somebody with influence likes it hot all the time and doesn't want to layer up.  Last time I checked, most people don't expect to be nice and toasty wearing short sleeves in January.



  • @DOA said:

    I hope that job pays, cause, godamn, I wouldn't tolerate even half of that. And seriously... no AC? It's 2009, wtf are they thinking?
    I know, right?  Here I am in Cincinnati where most offices are over cooled all summer, to the point that I have two coworkers that have space heaters for use mostly in the summer.  I just go the fuck outside and/or wear clothes that, y'know, cover my body.



  • @Justice said:

    He might also be in a building that has air conditioning but really shitty ductwork. Our floor at work always gets shortchanged on the cool air, while down below us it feels like a crisp fall day.  In July.

    I recall an open-plan floor at a telco, where one zone had people rugged up like it was winter, and another had people relaxing in Hawaiian shirts. More typically these days in modern buildings, the desks out on the open-plan floor are too hot, while the meeting rooms around the edges are like walk-in freezers.

    @Justice said:


    Also in the "seasonal WTF" category: my section of the cube farm frequently hits 80-85 degrees in winter.  And this is western New York, which does not exactly have warm winters.  My first winter here I spent way too much time bitching about the heat and was told "it's an old building, this happens."  Ok, fine.  Next winter I find out that facilities keeps the heat around 75 F all winter.

    My theory is, somebody with influence likes it hot all the time and doesn't want to layer up.  Last time I checked, most people don't expect to be nice and toasty wearing short sleeves in January.

    My theory is that the temperature is always set to please the whiny cold-blooded females in impractical clothing, not warm-blooded males. Winter (right now, Down Under) is the worst because you need to have warm clothing for getting around outside, but inside is always bloody summertime. At least these days nobody cares that I don't wear a tie, and roll my sleeves up to work in the sauna.



  • When someone dumps something in my lap with an excessively short deadline, unless I know that there is a legitimate emergency, I usually let it sit for a day or so before getting to it.

    It avoids lots of working all night for something that (failing an actual emergency) usually isn't as much of a rush as the person who dumped it on you says it is.

    It also avoids rushing to do something, only to have to repeatedly do it over because the person who gave it to you rushed through the requirements and winds up changing them several times.

    The trick is to be able to discern between actual emergencies, and management stupidity.

    For the record, in 30 years, I've only misjudged the importance of the situation once, and didn't pay any real consequences.



  • @belgariontheking said:

    @DOA said:

    I hope that job pays, cause, godamn, I wouldn't tolerate even half of that. And seriously... no AC? It's 2009, wtf are they thinking?
    I know, right?  Here I am in Cincinnati where most offices are over cooled all summer, to the point that I have two coworkers that have space heaters for use mostly in the summer.  I just go the fuck outside and/or wear clothes that, y'know, cover my body.

    Having a space heater (rather than just bundling up) is pretty damn lame.  I once worked in an office building that would kick the A/C on so hard that our section of the building would cool too quickly and the central heat would then kick on.  My cube was right under the vent for awhile and it was hell getting blasted with freezer-like air followed by hot air a minute later.  We eventually just taped some crap over the vent so it didn't blow down on us.



  • @rosko said:

    @Justice said:


    Also in the "seasonal WTF" category: my section of the cube farm frequently hits 80-85 degrees in winter.  And this is western New York, which does not exactly have warm winters.  My first winter here I spent way too much time bitching about the heat and was told "it's an old building, this happens."  Ok, fine.  Next winter I find out that facilities keeps the heat around 75 F all winter.

    My theory is, somebody with influence likes it hot all the time and doesn't want to layer up.  Last time I checked, most people don't expect to be nice and toasty wearing short sleeves in January.

    My theory is that the temperature is always set to please the whiny cold-blooded females in impractical clothing, not warm-blooded males. Winter (right now, Down Under) is the worst because you need to have warm clothing for getting around outside, but inside is always bloody summertime. At least these days nobody cares that I don't wear a tie, and roll my sleeves up to work in the sauna.

     

    Funny how 'whiny' and 'influential' seem to correlate so often.  We have a few whiny men too: mostly guys with bad circulation sitting by the windows.  Then again, I'm griping about the heat on here, so who am I to talk?

    But yeah, the winter is the worst.  I walk to work, so I wear boots when the snow is heavy, and those days I'm usually in socks at my desk.  Sleeves stay rolled up, and the collar is open as far as it'll go without being indecent.  Of course, the appropriate attire would be running shorts and an athletic shirt, but I'm probably pushing the limits on the dress code as it is.

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Having a space heater (rather than just bundling up) is pretty damn
    lame.  I once worked in an office building that would kick the A/C on
    so hard that our section of the building would cool too quickly and the
    central heat would then kick on.  My cube was right under the vent for
    awhile and it was hell getting blasted with freezer-like air followed
    by hot air a minute later.  We eventually just taped some crap over the
    vent so it didn't blow down on us.

    How exactly was this system set up?  Most of the office buildings I've been in have a central control that's either set to heat or cool.  Did the units in your building run off two separate thermostats but share the same vents?



  • I worked in an L-shaped building where each "wing" of the L had its own independent temperature controls.  One wing held four offices, the kitchen, and the server room (i.e. a repurposed large meeting room, a WTF in its own right), and the temperature was thus turned all the way down.  The other wing held two occupied offices, the meeting room, the bathroom, and three unoccupied offices.  The temperature on that wing (where my office was located) was kept relatively warm.

    The boss's office was the coldest - right next to the A/C units outside, I'm sure.  He wore sweaters to work even in the dead of summer.  In the winter, he wore two sweaters, because the A/C was on in that wing even in the winter.

    So I would be in my office, nice and cozy, wearing short sleeve shirts (in the summer) or just a long-sleeve shirt (in the winter).  I'd go to the boss's office and literally shiver while talking to him, whether it was summer or winter.  I didn't really want to bring a coat just for the five minutes a day I had to spend in his office...


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @snoofle said:

    When someone dumps something in my lap with an excessively short deadline, unless I know that there is a legitimate emergency, I usually let it sit for a day or so before getting to it.
    That doesn't work when your entire system's ability to function within your contracted period is dependent upon a positive outcome. It's perfectly fine if they use their own system - I still have the damned conversion tool. However if they AREN'T, and were to try to follow the instructions in the manual for the new system (which, by the way has huge placards on it that say "PRE-RELEASE INFORMATION, DO NOT USE BEFORE CUTOVER DATE" - but a number of high profile twats - board members - have issued standing orders countermanding the development team - it's only through a carefully planned insurgency amongst the rank and file that's giving us enough time to finish it), they'd end up skullfucking the entire company.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @dhromed said:

    @Weng said:

    Beer. Girls. Fried food. Fresh food. Tonight. Make arrangements.
     

    FTFY

    A rich meal made by someone else is way more satisfying than greasy fried shit.

    Also, get [1...n] girls to successively apply a lap dance to your person.

    No, actually. Wings, fish and chips, and nachos were WAY better than a rich meal. You expect a classy restaurant to serve beer called shit like "Flying Dog - Doggystyle" and <illegible scribble on my phone's notepad>? No, those shitholes serve crap like Bud Light - their idea of "good" is Guiness. </beernazi>

     

    At any rate, salty, greasy fried food is bar food because that's exactly what the body needs to recover from the poison you're dumping down your gullet - salt and fat.The breading and fries help absorb it, too.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @DOA said:

     I hope that job pays, cause, godamn, I wouldn't tolerate even half of that. And seriously... no AC? It's 2009, wtf are they thinking?

    Considering I'm an outside contractor and my office is in my dad's house's second unit, I can't very well blame my employers for the AC. And yes, the job pays like hell. I racked up $4500 in charges for that one rush. Hopefully this is sufficient financial incentive NOT TO DO IT AGAIN.



  • @Justice said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Having a space heater (rather than just bundling up) is pretty damn
    lame.  I once worked in an office building that would kick the A/C on
    so hard that our section of the building would cool too quickly and the
    central heat would then kick on.  My cube was right under the vent for
    awhile and it was hell getting blasted with freezer-like air followed
    by hot air a minute later.  We eventually just taped some crap over the
    vent so it didn't blow down on us.

    How exactly was this system set up?  Most of the office buildings I've been in have a central control that's either set to heat or cool.  Did the units in your building run off two separate thermostats but share the same vents?

    Supposedly it was very expensive and "fancy" and used a software-based control.  From what I could gather, it didn't have heating/cooling modes but instead just did what it had to to keep the "zones" within the right temp.  The problem with our area was that the temperature sensor was in a completely closed-off room separate from us so the temperature the system "saw" for our area was often quite different.   It also had another annoying problem: the zones all bumped temps up ~15 degrees after 6PM because the system assumed everyone was at home.  Since we had lots of late-night releases, coding sessions or just run-of-the-mill disasters that required people to be in our area it was often hot as hell.  We finally just got a heating pad and taped it to the temperature sensor in the other room.  The system freaked out and quickly cooled the 90 degree room down to quite lovely temperatures.  IIRC, we ended up breaking it...



  • @Weng said:

    You expect a classy restaurant to serve beer called shit like "Flying Dog - Doggystyle" and <illegible scribble on my phone's notepad>? No, those shitholes serve crap like Bud Light - their idea of "good" is Guiness. </beernazi>

    True that. Now I just have to get down to Baltimore sometime and try <illegible scribble on my phone's notepad>. Sounds like a tasty one.

    The first rule of microbrew is: the weirder the name, the better the beer.



  • @Weng said:

    @DOA said:

     I hope that job pays, cause, godamn, I wouldn't tolerate even half of that.

    And yes, the job pays like hell. I racked up $4500 in charges for that one rush. Hopefully this is sufficient financial incentive NOT TO DO IT AGAIN.

    That depends to a certain extent on what the normal rate is.

    If that's normal billing for you for a week or less, you can probably expect a lot of repeats.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Just did up this week's bill for them - $7200 over TWO AND A HALF DAYS. For ONE GUY and some "consumables" - per-mile wear and tear+gas on my car, exorbitant per-page printing fees for testing the goddamn reports. Regular rate plus normal overtime (double), plus quadruple-overtime. I was very tempted to go up to the 8x multiplier.  . Normally they'd be in the $2500/month borderline-charity bracket.



  • Similar thing happened to a me and a mate of mine working in the same place...

     He was plodding through the project (an extranet for some industrial firm) believing the deadline was in two months. Our project manager comes up to him and says "You do know it needs to be ready by Friday don't you?"  - This is on Wednesday at 5pm as we're leaving to go home.

    He went in the office early the next day, didn't leave until nearly midnight, and gets me and another guy roped in to hurriedly code up this thing. We go home and congratulate ourselves on a job well done (and some speedy keyboardery), and think the client will be happy.

    Client comes in on Friday for a meeting as planned. However, our project manager got it wrong... it wasn't the "ok-we're-about-to-make-this-live-today-so-please-help-us-check-it-works" meeting that we (and obviously the project manager) thought it was... It was the "we're-a-month-in-are-we-keeping-to-schedule" meeting.

    From client's point of view, it couldn't have gone any better ("You're ready to launch? NOW?!? Groovy!") From ours, not so much - We ran our project manager out of the firm fairly sharpish, with pitch forks and everything... and yes, the deadline was two months from that point.

    And yes, he really did say "Groovy!"



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Supposedly it was very expensive and "fancy" and used a software-based control.  From what I could gather, it didn't have heating/cooling modes but instead just did what it had to to keep the "zones" within the right temp.  The problem with our area was that the temperature sensor was in a completely closed-off room separate from us so the temperature the system "saw" for our area was often quite different.   It also had another annoying problem: the zones all bumped temps up ~15 degrees after 6PM because the system assumed everyone was at home.  Since we had lots of late-night releases, coding sessions or just run-of-the-mill disasters that required people to be in our area it was often hot as hell.  We finally just got a heating pad and taped it to the temperature sensor in the other room.  The system freaked out and quickly cooled the 90 degree room down to quite lovely temperatures.  IIRC, we ended up breaking it...

     

    Good grief, talk about overcomplicating something.  



  •  Also, I can top you all in terms of shitty work conditions.  At the Fedex terminal I work at, we have no climate control except for garage doors.  In winter, it drops to minus 40, and in summer, it can get as hot as 130 degrees.  So in summer, we usually firs thing open every damn door that isn't locked, and in winter, any time a driver opens a door to come in with his truck, he is instantly the least popular man in the building.



  • @MeesterTurner said:

    Client comes in on Friday for a meeting as planned. However, our project manager got it wrong... it wasn't the "ok-we're-about-to-make-this-live-today-so-please-help-us-check-it-works" meeting that we (and obviously the project manager) thought it was... It was the "we're-a-month-in-are-we-keeping-to-schedule" meeting.

    From client's point of view, it couldn't have gone any better ("You're ready to launch? NOW?!? Groovy!") From ours, not so much - We ran our project manager out of the firm fairly sharpish, with pitch forks and everything... and yes, the deadline was two months from that point.

    And yes, he really did say "Groovy!"

     

    I think you got shanghaied.  The PM probably knew the actual deadline but was trying to get a feather in his cap for early completion.  Too bad for him that your company seems to be relatively sane, at least when it comes to the amount of BS they're willing to tolerate.



  • @Master Chief said:

    In winter, it drops to minus 40, and in summer, it can get as hot as 130 degrees. 

     

    Alright, I am dieing to know where in the world it goes from minus 40 to 130?  



  • @amischiefr said:

    @Master Chief said:

    In winter, it drops to minus 40, and in summer, it can get as hot as 130 degrees. 

     

    Alright, I am dieing to know where in the world it goes from minus 40 to 130?  

    Who said it was this world?  More and more companies are outsourcing to Mercury.



  • @bstorer said:

    @amischiefr said:

    @Master Chief said:

    In winter, it drops to minus 40, and in summer, it can get as hot as 130 degrees. 

     

    Alright, I am dieing to know where in the world it goes from minus 40 to 130?  

    Who said it was this world?  More and more companies are outsourcing to Mercury.

    Those damn Molten-Lead Eating Wage Pirates and their lack of planetary rotation*!



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    their lack of planetary rotation*!
     

    Wait a minute, that isn't tr--

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Filed under: *Yes I know this is not true.

    BASTARD.



  • @amischiefr said:

    @Master Chief said:

    In winter, it drops to minus 40, and in summer, it can get as hot as 130 degrees. 

     

    Alright, I am dieing to know where in the world it goes from minus 40 to 130?  


    I can't claim personal experience of -40 to +130, but I can claim personal experience of around -45 to +100 to +110 in Magnitogorsk, Russia. A small town of 1/2 million people nestled in the western region of Siberia. Of course that is from the low at night in mid winter to the daytime high in mid summer.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

     It's now Monday morning and I've not worked a damn bit since I posted this thread - another godforsaken meeting. One of the key stakeholders has COMPLETELY reversed her stance on one of her department's features - namely whether the general public should be able to directly register with the system or if they're going to use her office as intermediaries. It was an originally-planned feature but was scrapped just before go-live at her insistence. The code still exists, but is disabled and is not up to date on bugfixes and change requests. ARGH.Fortunately this should only be one afternoon's work, rather than a goddamn impossibility.



  • @Master Chief said:

    In winter, it drops to minus 40, and in summer, it can get as hot as 130 degrees.

    Hmm...  Death Valley goes from positive 40 in winter to positive 136 in summer...

    I would assume that you are talking temperature inside an oven-like aluminum warehouse, then?  Otherwise, that range seems a bit extreme for being on this planet.



  • Count me as one of the 'whiny cold-blooded females' if you like, but a few jobs back I was in an office that shared a thermostat with 2 other offices.  The one at the end was always a couple of degrees above the thermostat setting, the middle office was just on it, and my office was a few degrees below.  The two 'warm-blooded males' in the warm office were always complaining it was too hot, I always complained it was too cold.  The solution - as well as my usual jeans and sweater (worn for the office, even in 30degC summer) I had a fleecy, blanket, gloves, hot-water bottle and fan heater tucked away in a drawer. The fleecy and blanket were used almost every day, the hot-water bottle only once or twice.  No-one knew what the problem was - it had been 'fixed' several times. Oh, and taping something over the vent was prohibited - and ineffective.



  • @tgape said:

    Hmm...  Death Valley goes from positive 40 in winter to positive 136 in summer...

    I would assume that you are talking temperature inside an oven-like aluminum warehouse, then?  Otherwise, that range seems a bit extreme for being on this planet.

     

    Props to apparently the only person on this board who can read.  The"warehouse" and "garage doors" bits I would've thought could give it away but, oh well...



  • @Mel said:

    Count me as one of the 'whiny cold-blooded females' if you like, but a few jobs back I was in an office that shared a thermostat with 2 other offices.  The one at the end was always a couple of degrees above the thermostat setting, the middle office was just on it, and my office was a few degrees below.

     

    Just swapping offices with the guy at the other end was not an option?



  • @Ilya Ehrenburg said:

    @Mel said:

    Count me as one of the 'whiny cold-blooded females' if you like, but a few jobs back I was in an office that shared a thermostat with 2 other offices.  The one at the end was always a couple of degrees above the thermostat setting, the middle office was just on it, and my office was a few degrees below.

     

    Just swapping offices with the guy at the other end was not an option?

    Ew, cooties!



  •  @morbiuswilters said:

    Ew, cooties!

    @wikipedia said:

    Cooties is a non-scientific term in North American English
    used by children for a disease or condition perceived to infect others,
    particularly members of the opposite sex. One catches cooties through
    any form of bodily contact, proximity, or touching an infected person's
    possessions. [b]The phase typically passes by age 5-14[/b].

    Ah ha! Now we know how old you really are.



  • @Ilya Ehrenburg said:

     @morbiuswilters said:

    Ew, cooties!

    @wikipedia said:

    Cooties is a non-scientific term in North American English
    used by children for a disease or condition perceived to infect others,
    particularly members of the opposite sex. One catches cooties through
    any form of bodily contact, proximity, or touching an infected person's
    possessions. The phase typically passes by age 5-14.

    Ah ha! Now we know how old you really are.

    Only mentally.



  • @MeesterTurner said:

    He went in the office early the next day, didn't leave until nearly midnight, and gets me and another guy roped in to hurriedly code up this thing. We go home and congratulate ourselves on a job well done (and some speedy keyboardery), and think the client will be happy.

    ...

     the deadline was two months from that point.

     

    So you mean to tell us that you finished two months of scheduled work in 1 (very long) day, equivalent to maybe 2 or 3 normal days?

    I've heard of fudge factors, but that's ridiculous.



  • @Aaron said:

    So you mean to tell us that you finished two months of scheduled work in 1 (very long) day, equivalent to maybe 2 or 3 normal days?

    I've heard of fudge factors, but that's ridiculous.

    Typical fudge factors round here involve estimating the time the original request will (reasonably) take, doubling the number, and increase the units (one hour -> 2 days, 3 days -> 6 weeks, 1 week -> 2 months.) So it's not that unbelievable.

    We're that far down the 'chain of command' that it's usually accurate when you take into account changes of scope, interruptions etc.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Aaron said:

    So you mean to tell us that you finished two months of scheduled work in 1 (very long) day, equivalent to maybe 2 or 3 normal days?

    I've heard of fudge factors, but that's ridiculous.

    I'm an outside contractor and have other jobs. And no, I didn't finish 2 months of scheduled work, in fact I didn't even finish what I was told I needed to do. I didn't even get halfway before I found out I was working for nothing. Even if I had finished, I wouldn't have cleared 2 months of scheduled work - bumping certain features to the front of the schedule doesn't mean you complete all the features that were in line ahead of it as well.

    End result, once you take into account that I did damage to other features to rush this one through, delayed dozens more, and then had to take several days off to decompress, I'm now WELL BEHIND on this project - never fucking mind what it's done to my other clients.


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