Krispy Kreme fail



  •  I was checking out the Krispy Kreme Australia website and noticed something strange: http://www.krispykreme.com.au/stores/index.cfm?locid=9791

    "Phone: Not connected" - WTF?

     Bonus points for not keeping it current. I know for a fact there is a store in Broadbeach: http://www.krispykreme.com.au/stores/index.cfm?locid=8829 reckons the closest one is 22km away!

    The above two links are for searching via post code. You can also list by state: http://www.krispykreme.com.au/stores/qld.cfm lists the Broadbeach store AND Caboolture North's phone numbers! (Though South's number is still missing. It is, however, found on the White Pages) Why bother including this information for some but not all stores?



  • Personally, I've never had the need to call a Krispy Kreme store, or Dunkin Donuts for that matter... it's sort of a given that when you get there, baked goods will be ready and waiting.



  • @snoofle said:

    Personally, I've never had the need to call a Krispy Kreme store, or Dunkin Donuts for that matter... it's sort of a given that when you get there, baked goods will be ready and waiting.

    Maybe if you're the type of person that wants to know if their favorite doughnut is available that day.  Geez, what a sad life that would be.



  • @snoofle said:

    Personally, I've never had the need to call a Krispy Kreme store, or Dunkin Donuts for that matter... it's sort of a given that when you get there, baked goods will be ready and waiting.
    Sometimes you need to buy hundreds of donuts. Like, for example, on Donut Day. If you don't call ahead there's no guarantee they'll have enough, or they'll hate you for cleaning out their inventory. Which I did do on Donut Day this year, along with my coworker. Mmmmm, fried pastry.



  • @Welbog said:

    @snoofle said:

    Personally, I've never had the need to call a Krispy Kreme store, or Dunkin Donuts for that matter... it's sort of a given that when you get there, baked goods will be ready and waiting.
    Sometimes you need to buy hundreds of donuts. Like, for example, on Donut Day. If you don't call ahead there's no guarantee they'll have enough, or they'll hate you for cleaning out their inventory. Which I did do on Donut Day this year, along with my coworker. Mmmmm, fried pastry.

    Nah, you'll just have to wait as they roll off the frosting machine.  Unless, of course, you're trying to buy something other than the glazed, in which case, why are you at Krispy Kreme in the first place?



  • @bstorer said:

    @Welbog said:
    @snoofle said:
    Personally, I've never had the need to call a Krispy Kreme store, or Dunkin Donuts for that matter... it's sort of a given that when you get there, baked goods will be ready and waiting.
    Sometimes you need to buy hundreds of donuts. Like, for example, on Donut Day. If you don't call ahead there's no guarantee they'll have enough, or they'll hate you for cleaning out their inventory. Which I did do on Donut Day this year, along with my coworker. Mmmmm, fried pastry.
    Nah, you'll just have to wait as they roll off the frosting machine.  Unless, of course, you're trying to buy something other than the glazed, in which case, why are you at Krispy Kreme in the first place?
    Well, Krispy Kreme is shit so I wouldn't be there in the first place. I'd be at a real donut shop eating donuts that are made from real dead donuts instead of fake donuts.



  • @Welbog said:

    @bstorer said:

    @Welbog said:
    @snoofle said:
    Personally, I've never had the need to call a Krispy Kreme store, or Dunkin Donuts for that matter... it's sort of a given that when you get there, baked goods will be ready and waiting.
    Sometimes you need to buy hundreds of donuts. Like, for example, on Donut Day. If you don't call ahead there's no guarantee they'll have enough, or they'll hate you for cleaning out their inventory. Which I did do on Donut Day this year, along with my coworker. Mmmmm, fried pastry.
    Nah, you'll just have to wait as they roll off the frosting machine.  Unless, of course, you're trying to buy something other than the glazed, in which case, why are you at Krispy Kreme in the first place?
    Well, Krispy Kreme is shit so I wouldn't be there in the first place. I'd be at a real donut shop eating donuts that are made from real dead donuts instead of fake donuts.

    Spoken like a true idiot Canadian idiot (turns out I was right the first time).



  • @bstorer said:

    Nah, you'll just have to wait as they roll off the frosting machine.  Unless, of course, you're trying to buy something other than the glazed, in which case, why are you at Krispy Kreme in the first place?
     

    Krispy Kreme stopped doing that back in Utah.  Now they ship donuts to their various stores from one central location.  No longer can you get a fresh donut off the donut-making machine :(



  • @Heron said:

    @bstorer said:

    Nah, you'll just have to wait as they roll off the frosting machine.  Unless, of course, you're trying to buy something other than the glazed, in which case, why are you at Krispy Kreme in the first place?
     

    Krispy Kreme stopped doing that back in Utah.  Now they ship donuts to their various stores from one central location.  No longer can you get a fresh donut off the donut-making machine :(

    PROTIP: 8 seconds in the microwave (preferably suspended by a wooden spoon through the hole resting on two coffee mugs, so as not to ruin the glaze) will bring it back to reasonably-close-to-fresh.  We had a lot of spare time in college to work this out, in case you were wondering.



  • @bstorer said:

    8 seconds in the microwave
     

    +1 wba, but what the hell? A baked good in the microwave turns to pudding is my experience -- but that experience is limited to defrosting frozen slices of bread.



  • @Welbog said:

    @bstorer said:

    @Welbog said:
    @snoofle said:
    Personally, I've never had the need to call a Krispy Kreme store, or Dunkin Donuts for that matter... it's sort of a given that when you get there, baked goods will be ready and waiting.
    Sometimes you need to buy hundreds of donuts. Like, for example, on Donut Day. If you don't call ahead there's no guarantee they'll have enough, or they'll hate you for cleaning out their inventory. Which I did do on Donut Day this year, along with my coworker. Mmmmm, fried pastry.
    Nah, you'll just have to wait as they roll off the frosting machine.  Unless, of course, you're trying to buy something other than the glazed, in which case, why are you at Krispy Kreme in the first place?
    Well, Krispy Kreme is shit so I wouldn't be there in the first place. I'd be at a real donut shop eating donuts that are made from real dead donuts instead of fake donuts.

    Tim Hortons coffee is undrinkable garbage.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Welbog said:
    @bstorer said:
    @Welbog said:
    @snoofle said:
    Personally, I've never had the need to call a Krispy Kreme store, or Dunkin Donuts for that matter... it's sort of a given that when you get there, baked goods will be ready and waiting.
    Sometimes you need to buy hundreds of donuts. Like, for example, on Donut Day. If you don't call ahead there's no guarantee they'll have enough, or they'll hate you for cleaning out their inventory. Which I did do on Donut Day this year, along with my coworker. Mmmmm, fried pastry.
    Nah, you'll just have to wait as they roll off the frosting machine.  Unless, of course, you're trying to buy something other than the glazed, in which case, why are you at Krispy Kreme in the first place?
    Well, Krispy Kreme is shit so I wouldn't be there in the first place. I'd be at a real donut shop eating donuts that are made from real dead donuts instead of fake donuts.
    Tim Hortons coffee is undrinkable garbage.
    Who the fuck goes to Tim Hortons for coffee?



  • @Welbog said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @Welbog said:
    @bstorer said:
    @Welbog said:
    @snoofle said:
    Personally, I've never had the need to call a Krispy Kreme store, or Dunkin Donuts for that matter... it's sort of a given that when you get there, baked goods will be ready and waiting.
    Sometimes you need to buy hundreds of donuts. Like, for example, on Donut Day. If you don't call ahead there's no guarantee they'll have enough, or they'll hate you for cleaning out their inventory. Which I did do on Donut Day this year, along with my coworker. Mmmmm, fried pastry.
    Nah, you'll just have to wait as they roll off the frosting machine.  Unless, of course, you're trying to buy something other than the glazed, in which case, why are you at Krispy Kreme in the first place?
    Well, Krispy Kreme is shit so I wouldn't be there in the first place. I'd be at a real donut shop eating donuts that are made from real dead donuts instead of fake donuts.
    Tim Hortons coffee is undrinkable garbage.
    Who the fuck goes to Tim Hortons for coffee?

    I hate donuts.  However, when you need coffee and Tim Hortons is the only option, you might just be desperate enough...



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    I hate donuts.
    I don't think we can be friends anymore.



  • I've done that - the last place I worked, we used to do day trips up to our sattelite offices, and the boss would only ever stop at Tim Hortons.  After getting up four hours early, and having a 17+ hour day ahead, their coffee starts to look really good...

    Luckily everybody drinks Starbucks at the place I work now.  Overpriced, but doesn't really matter when the boss is playing XD



  • @dhromed said:

    @bstorer said:

    8 seconds in the microwave
     

    +1 wba, but what the hell? A baked good in the microwave turns to pudding is my experience -- but that experience is limited to defrosting frozen slices of bread.

    Krispy Kreme are supposed to be extremely soft and gooey -- they're yeast-raised and thus much lighter and less dense than a cake donut.  8 seconds is just long enough to heat up the donut and melt the glaze.  If you have a really powerful microwave, you might need to shorten it by a second or two.



  • I can only assume that the standard of coffee-making in Starbucks is rather higher on your side of the Atlantic; over here it's not noticeably better than you get in McDonalds, or a jar of Nescafe for that matter. 



  • @Jake Grey said:

    I can only assume that the standard of coffee-making in Starbucks is rather higher on your side of the Atlantic; over here it's not noticeably better than you get in McDonalds, or a jar of Nescafe for that matter. 

    I don't drink hot coffee, but I love Starbuck's iced coffee and espresso offerings.  Dunkin' Donuts is tasty as well.

     

    Sigh... I guess I now have another reason never to visit Europe...



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Sigh... I guess I now have another reason never to visit Europe...
    Starbucks != every coffeeshop between the Atlantic and the Urals, at least so far. There are at least a couple of dozen independent places within ten miles of where I'm sitting, several of which do really good coffee a good bit cheaper. (It may help that I live near a college town.) We even have four or five different Starbucks analogues in competition, even if they're all equally overpriced and mediocre.



  • @Jake Grey said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Sigh... I guess I now have another reason never to visit Europe...
    Starbucks != every coffeeshop between the Atlantic and the Urals, at least so far. There are at least a couple of dozen independent places within ten miles of where I'm sitting, several of which do really good coffee a good bit cheaper. (It may help that I live near a college town.) We even have four or five different Starbucks analogues in competition, even if they're all equally overpriced and mediocre.

     

    The problem is knowing which independent coffee shops are good.  Corporate places tend to have more consistency, at least within the US; Starbucks tastes the same in Dallas, Seattle, NYC and Honolulu.  I like some local places around here, but when traveling it's inconvenient to weed out the bad ones.



  • @dhromed said:

    @bstorer said:

    8 seconds in the microwave
     

    +1 wba, but what the hell? A baked good in the microwave turns to pudding is my experience -- but that experience is limited to defrosting frozen slices of bread.

     

    You want to find the good balance between intensity ("watt") and length.

    If you mutiply the two you get a scale of how your slice will be: less means frozen/moist and cold more means dry (up to sand-dry) and warm
    Altough higher intensity means water will quicker evaporate, low intensity means the evaporation will be more equal spread through the slice(s)
    For a lot (e.g. half a loaf) you probably want to use medium intensity (e.g. 500-600 Watt) and a little length (e.q. 2 minutes) but it depends on your microwave, bread and taste

    If I make bread for myself (4 slices)  I like to use a high intensity (850 Watt) but a short time (10-15 seconds). That way the bread is unfrozen and soft, but still a little cold (don't ask me, I just like the coldness)

    Oh, and last but not least: it's very important to not just lay the slices directly on the glass plate: that way if some bigger chuck of ice melts it comes on the plate and the slice directly on the plate will suck all moisture up (which gives you the pudding of your experience). If you have a oven-microwave combination you can use one of the grate's that usually comes with it. Next best thing is a place or bowl-like-shaped object in which the frozen slices don't touch the bottom directly (altough they might after they're softer from defrosting)



  • @dtech said:

    @dhromed said:

    @bstorer said:

    8 seconds in the microwave
     

    +1 wba, but what the hell? A baked good in the microwave turns to pudding is my experience -- but that experience is limited to defrosting frozen slices of bread.

     

    You want to find the good balance between intensity ("watt") and length.

    If you mutiply the two you get a scale of how your slice will be: less means frozen/moist and cold more means dry (up to sand-dry) and warm
    Altough higher intensity means water will quicker evaporate, low intensity means the evaporation will be more equal spread through the slice(s)
    For a lot (e.g. half a loaf) you probably want to use medium intensity (e.g. 500-600 Watt) and a little length (e.q. 2 minutes) but it depends on your microwave, bread and taste

    If I make bread for myself (4 slices)  I like to use a high intensity (850 Watt) but a short time (10-15 seconds). That way the bread is unfrozen and soft, but still a little cold (don't ask me, I just like the coldness)

    Oh, and last but not least: it's very important to not just lay the slices directly on the glass plate: that way if some bigger chuck of ice melts it comes on the plate and the slice directly on the plate will suck all moisture up (which gives you the pudding of your experience). If you have a oven-microwave combination you can use one of the grate's that usually comes with it. Next best thing is a place or bowl-like-shaped object in which the frozen slices don't touch the bottom directly (altough they might after they're softer from defrosting)

    Dear God, frozen slices of bread?  Cooked in a microwave?  What kind of monstrosity is this?



  • @bstorer said:

    @Welbog said:

    @bstorer said:

    @Welbog said:
    @snoofle said:
    Personally, I've never had the need to call a Krispy Kreme store, or Dunkin Donuts for that matter... it's sort of a given that when you get there, baked goods will be ready and waiting.
    Sometimes you need to buy hundreds of donuts. Like, for example, on Donut Day. If you don't call ahead there's no guarantee they'll have enough, or they'll hate you for cleaning out their inventory. Which I did do on Donut Day this year, along with my coworker. Mmmmm, fried pastry.
    Nah, you'll just have to wait as they roll off the frosting machine.  Unless, of course, you're trying to buy something other than the glazed, in which case, why are you at Krispy Kreme in the first place?
    Well, Krispy Kreme is shit so I wouldn't be there in the first place. I'd be at a real donut shop eating donuts that are made from real dead donuts instead of fake donuts.

    Spoken like a true idiot Canadian idiot (turns out I was right the first time).
     

    Except that Krispy Kreme donuts taste like normal donuts that have gone stale and then been heavily coated in sugar to disguise that. I'm amazed that it's become popular in Australia given that we have much better donut places already operating here.

    Real donuts, proper fucking donuts are cooked on site, not shipped around the place, and dusted with sugar and cinnamon.



  • Krispy Kreme Yum

    @bstorer said:

    PROTIP: 8 seconds in the microwave (preferably suspended by a wooden spoon through the hole resting on two coffee mugs, so as not to ruin the glaze) will bring it back to reasonably-close-to-fresh.

    Thanks for the wooden spoon idea. I don't pass by the real Krispy Creme stores usually, but I'll pick up a box at the grocery store occassionally. Those are stale and bland straight from the box (which may have given other posters here a bad impression) but addictively warm, tasty, and sticky after 8 seconds.

    There certainly are still stores that make em fresh too. I would happily eat a dozen right away. Happily, that is, until my stomach explodes.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Dear God, frozen slices of bread?  Cooked in a microwave?  What kind of monstrosity is this?
     

    The kind of monstrosity you get if you had to leave home before the bakers' opened for about 6 years and as such had to make your breakfast and/or take-with-you-lunch with either old bread or defrosted bread.

    Thankfully that's all over now.



  • @dtech said:

    if you had to leave home before the bakers' opened for about 6 years
     

    Lord, you had the mental constitution to get fresh bread every day, in the early morning?

    I buy 1 or two whole loaves, and I freeze them.

    I never use the MW to defrost anymore, by the way. I use the toaster.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    The problem is knowing which independent coffee shops are good.  Corporate places tend to have more consistency, at least within the US; Starbucks tastes the same in Dallas, Seattle, NYC and Honolulu.  I like some local places around here, but when traveling it's inconvenient to weed out the bad ones.
    Around these parts, when you go to an independent coffee shop (eg. any one*), you look for the coffee brand they use. Of course, how good the coffee comes out will then depend on the quality of the coffee machine and the ability of the person who operates it.

    *Starbucks is a very recent phenomenon here in Portugal. And I don't think it will have much success. We like coffee in smaller, more concentrated doses.



  • @drinkingbird said:

    Except that Krispy Kreme donuts taste like normal donuts that have gone stale and then been heavily coated in sugar to disguise that. I'm amazed that it's become popular in Australia given that we have much better donut places already operating here.

    Real donuts, proper fucking donuts are cooked on site, not shipped around the place, and dusted with sugar and cinnamon.

    Frankly, if I ran your country, I'd ban Krispy Kreme from using their name if they make them centrally.  The appeal of Krispy Kreme is that they're made fresh on-site.  I'm (un)lucky enough to have one near my house, they have a big neon sign that says "HOT DONUTS" whenever a batch has just come off the line.

    Now if you want to talk about a travesty to the donut world, let's discuss Dunkin' Donuts...



  • Starbucks coffee? Geez. Last time I checked, they mainly attracted the same sort of people who go to MacDonalds to have a good family lunch.



  • @ounos said:

    Starbucks coffee? Geez. Last time I checked, they mainly attracted the same sort of people who go to MacDonalds to have a good family lunch.
    I don't think that's at all accurate.  Starbucks skews in favor of the upper classes, McDonalds in favor of the lower.  The bigger issue is that the Starbucks all-in-one barrista machine isn't even that great.  More often than not it results in espresso that has a metallic, burnt taste to it.



  • @Zecc said:

    *Starbucks is a very recent phenomenon here in Portugal. And I don't think it will have much success. We like coffee in smaller, more concentrated doses.
    Starbucks does espresso.  How much smaller and more concentrated can you get?



  • @dtech said:

    You want to find the good balance between intensity ("watt") and length.

    If you mutiply the two you get a scale of how your slice will be: less means frozen/moist and cold more means dry (up to sand-dry) and warm
    Altough higher intensity means water will quicker evaporate, low intensity means the evaporation will be more equal spread through the slice(s)
    For a lot (e.g. half a loaf) you probably want to use medium intensity (e.g. 500-600 Watt) and a little length (e.q. 2 minutes) but it depends on your microwave, bread and taste

    If I make bread for myself (4 slices)  I like to use a high intensity (850 Watt) but a short time (10-15 seconds).

    You've got a microwave oven where you can specify the power level as a number of watts? Every one I've ever seen takes a percentage (either a number from 1 to 10 or some other predefined steps like 100%/85%/70%/50%/30%). Also, it's been years since I've used any microwave oven weaker than 1000 watts (the ones at home and work are both 1100 watt).



  • @bstorer said:

    @Zecc said:

    *Starbucks is a very recent phenomenon here in Portugal. And I don't think it will have much success. We like coffee in smaller, more concentrated doses.
    Starbucks does espresso.  How much smaller and more concentrated can you get?

    A dusting of cocaine or amphetamines.



  • @bstorer said:

    @ounos said:

    Starbucks coffee? Geez. Last time I checked, they mainly attracted the same sort of people who go to MacDonalds to have a good family lunch.
    I don't think that's at all accurate.  Starbucks skews in favor of the upper classes, McDonalds in favor of the lower.  The bigger issue is that the Starbucks all-in-one barrista machine isn't even that great.  More often than not it results in espresso that has a metallic, burnt taste to it.

    Eh, I still think it's pretty good, all things considered, especially for a chain.  I don't drink straight espresso anyway, so the bitterness and burnt taste are masked pretty well by milk, ice and syrup.



  • @Welbog said:

    Well, Krispy Kreme is shit so I wouldn't be there in the first place. I'd be at a real donut shop eating donuts that are made from real dead donuts instead of fake donuts.
     

    I made the mistake of getting Top Pot doughnuts on a recent trip to Seattle. Everything else tastes like shit in comparison, and it's so far away!



  • Microwave oven power

    @Quietust said:

    You've got a microwave oven where you can specify the power level as a number of watts? Every one I've ever seen takes a percentage (either a number from 1 to 10 or some other predefined steps like 100%/85%/70%/50%/30%).

    Moreover, that percentage applies not to the instantaneous power but rather to portion of the cooking time during which the magnetron is powered. So hitting 1:00 Power 100% turns the magnetron on for 1:00 straight. Hitting 1:00 Power 50% cycles the magnetron 0:15 on, 0:15 off, 0:15 on, 0:15 off. If the total time is shorter than the cycle period, then the power cycle is the same as a shorter cook plus a wait. Don't enter 0:10 Power 50%. Just hit 0:05 100% and wait 0:05 before eating.



  • @AlpineR said:

    @Quietust said:
    You've got a microwave oven where you can specify the power level as a number of watts? Every one I've ever seen takes a percentage (either a number from 1 to 10 or some other predefined steps like 100%/85%/70%/50%/30%).

    Moreover, that percentage applies not to the instantaneous power but rather to portion of the cooking time during which the magnetron is powered. So hitting 1:00 Power 100% turns the magnetron on for 1:00 straight. Hitting 1:00 Power 50% cycles the magnetron 0:15 on, 0:15 off, 0:15 on, 0:15 off. If the total time is shorter than the cycle period, then the power cycle is the same as a shorter cook plus a wait. Don't enter 0:10 Power 50%. Just hit 0:05 100% and wait 0:05 before eating.
    This is far too informative.  Are you sure you're in the right place?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @bstorer said:

    This is far too informative.  Are you sure you're in the right place?

    Is this 'the new ASR'?



  • @obediah said:

    Pot doughnuts
    They're as good at 4:20 pm as they are at 4:20 pm two weeks ago when they were originally cooked.



  • @AlpineR said:

    @Quietust said:
    You've got a microwave oven where you can specify the power level as a number of watts? Every one I've ever seen takes a percentage (either a number from 1 to 10 or some other predefined steps like 100%/85%/70%/50%/30%).

    Moreover, that percentage applies not to the instantaneous power but rather to portion of the cooking time during which the magnetron is powered. So hitting 1:00 Power 100% turns the magnetron on for 1:00 straight. Hitting 1:00 Power 50% cycles the magnetron 0:15 on, 0:15 off, 0:15 on, 0:15 off. If the total time is shorter than the cycle period, then the power cycle is the same as a shorter cook plus a wait. Don't enter 0:10 Power 50%. Just hit 0:05 100% and wait 0:05 before eating.

    This explains why setting the microwave rifle I built out of an old magnetron to "stun" was killing half my targets and leaving the other half unscathed...



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    This explains why setting the microwave rifle I built out of an old magnetron to "stun" was killing half my targets and leaving the other half unscathed...
     

    That's because you spaced your victims evenly.



  •  @AlpineR said:

    Moreover, that percentage applies not to the instantaneous power but rather to portion of the cooking time during which the magnetron is powered.

    That's odd; I've never noticed varying on/off sounds when setting to various powers and times.Are you sure your intel is correct?


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @dhromed said:

     @AlpineR said:

    Moreover, that percentage applies not to the instantaneous power but rather to portion of the cooking time during which the magnetron is powered.

    That's odd; I've never noticed varying on/off sounds when setting to various powers and times.Are you sure your intel is correct?

    It would appear to accurately describe the behaviour of the microwave we have at work - on anything other than 100%, you can distinctly hear it turning on and off.



  • @PJH said:

    you can distinctly hear it turning on and off.
     

    Mine too.

    But I haven't noticed any particular on/off interval size with the various wattage settings, is what I mean.

    Perhaps I should pay more attention to the world around me. Now hand me that doobie.



  • @dhromed said:

    That's odd; I've never noticed varying on/off sounds when setting to various powers and times.Are you sure your intel is correct?
     

    Now that I think about it: it exactly matches everything my current student-home-cheap-ass-microwave does: you can clearly hear it making the "I'm cooking" and "I'm just turning the food" sound. It would also explain why I can't defrost frozen foods with it quite as well (I used to do that at low intensity for a long time): It just burns the edges and leaves the inside frosted.

    My previous microwave (parent's house) didn't do any of those symptoms however: the main difference was how much noise it made. But then again: it was of a "real" brand and was about 20 times as expensive, even if you neglect inflation...

    It might also be just clever covering-up from the engineers that designed the thing



  • @dtech said:

    "I'm just turning the food"
     

    That makes me smile, because I imagine the device as having this Family Guy-style, opiate smile, muttering; juuust turning the food... turning... the food... turning it...

     

    I'm gonna do a Kermit The Frog.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

     @dtech said:

    you can clearly hear it making the "I'm cooking" and "I'm just turning the food" sound.
    Yes, this appropriately models my current microwave (and the other 7 of the fuckers I've owned in the past 2 years) - however the ancestral microwave - which by the way didn't actually die, but was removed from use because it was burning a hole in the side of the fucking cooking chamber (it had long ago melted away the plastic panel opposite the magnetron - I'm talking about actually melting the METAL CHAMBER - actually had honest to god variable power (it also had an off/on mode like modern ones use, but that was a distinct mode for some sort of distinct usage).

     Yes, it required me to press more buttons to nuke a hot pocket than it would take to nuke Moscow (it was apparently one of the first models with an all-touchpad interface so they hadn't quite gotten it down), but that microwave was awesome. 



  • @Weng said:

    I'm talking about actually melting the METAL CHAMBER
     @Weng said:
    it required me to press more buttons to nuke a hot pocket than it would take to nuke Moscow
    @Weng said:
    that microwave was awesome.

    I see the relation.

    I see it.



  •  About 10 years ago EVERY microwave oven I saw was a Sharp Carousel, but as far as I remember always had the solid on for 10 seconds, off for 10 seconds for 50% power. The best feature on mine was the "instant start" button which put 1 minute on the clock and started it immediately. Pressing the button again added 1 minute. These days there's a lot more brands available and I don't think I've seen a Carousel in some time. My own Carousel died and I got some cheap brand which does seem to have a better multi-power mode - choose in 100W increments up to 1000W, though starting cooking requires pressing "TIME" before the numbers, then "start", with no extension feature. But it is more powerful as the Carousel was only 600W.

     About Krispy Kreme donuts: I don't mind them but my favourite donuts are the ones from Donut King: freshly made with cinnamon sugar. Mmm! The KK ones do seem to last longer without going bad so quickly. The glaze was something different but it hasn't become my favourite. I was checking out the site because my father was visiting and he mentioned something about them opening in his city (about 120km west of here) so was seeing it if were true. It could be, but you wouldn't know it from the state of their web site!



  • @dtech said:

    @dhromed said:

    @bstorer said:

    8 seconds in the microwave
     

    +1 wba, but what the hell? A baked good in the microwave turns to pudding is my experience -- but that experience is limited to defrosting frozen slices of bread.

     

    You want to find the good balance between intensity ("watt") and length.

    If you mutiply the two you get a scale of how your slice will be: less means frozen/moist and cold more means dry (up to sand-dry) and warm
    Altough higher intensity means water will quicker evaporate, low intensity means the evaporation will be more equal spread through the slice(s)
    For a lot (e.g. half a loaf) you probably want to use medium intensity (e.g. 500-600 Watt) and a little length (e.q. 2 minutes) but it depends on your microwave, bread and taste

    If I make bread for myself (4 slices)  I like to use a high intensity (850 Watt) but a short time (10-15 seconds). That way the bread is unfrozen and soft, but still a little cold (don't ask me, I just like the coldness)

    Oh, and last but not least: it's very important to not just lay the slices directly on the glass plate: that way if some bigger chuck of ice melts it comes on the plate and the slice directly on the plate will suck all moisture up (which gives you the pudding of your experience). If you have a oven-microwave combination you can use one of the grate's that usually comes with it. Next best thing is a place or bowl-like-shaped object in which the frozen slices don't touch the bottom directly (altough they might after they're softer from defrosting)

     

     What I want to know is - what happens if you put one of them in one of those Subway high-speed toasting ovens?


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