When exactly?



  •  For those who dont know german: 

    DEEP-STACK POKER TOURNAMENT

    SUNDAY: 0000/00/00

    AT: 00:00




  • @holli said:

    For those who dont know german: 

    DEEP-STACK POKER TOURNAMENT

    SUNDAY: 0000/00/00

    AT: 00:00

    00:00 is a fairly easy time to handle.  It happens once every day around here.

    The 0000/00/00 bit is a bit trickier.  None of the traditional calendars I'm familiar with have a year 0000, and the only non-traditional one that I'm familiar with that has anything close didn't become commonly used even among its primary audience until around 0097 or so.  and even it doesn't have a /00/00 - the closest it comes is /00/01.  As such, I think you need a new calendar to pull that time off.

    Not, of course, that making a new calendar is all that difficult... it's just that, normally, it helps to have these things defined before you start advertising dates in them, so that people know what those dates mean.  Also, virtually every calendar I've ever encountered (one possible exception) was based on a start date which had already happened, making it pretty difficult to schedule anything for the initial date, anyway.

    For the curious, the one possible exception is unix epoc time: I don't know if that was defined in 1969/12/xx or if it was a bit later than that.



  • Ohh... I see. Perl (in one of the tabs) is the real WTF!



  • @tgape said:

    For the curious, the one possible exception is unix epoc time: I don't know if that was defined in 1969/12/xx or if it was a bit later than that.

     

    no



  •  It's fairly easy. They just use a proportional calendar!

    It's exactly the same, except that instead of the (approximate) birth of Jesus it uses the start of that tournament as a starting point!



  • @tgape said:

    @holli said:

    For those who dont know german: 

    DEEP-STACK POKER TOURNAMENT

    SUNDAY: 0000/00/00

    AT: 00:00

    00:00 is a fairly easy time to handle.  It happens once every day around here.

    The 0000/00/00 bit is a bit trickier.  None of the traditional calendars I'm familiar with have a year 0000, and the only non-traditional one that I'm familiar with that has anything close didn't become commonly used even among its primary audience until around 0097 or so.  and even it doesn't have a /00/00 - the closest it comes is /00/01.  As such, I think you need a new calendar to pull that time off.

    Huh?  You've obviously never heard of the y10k problem.  See also RFC2550.

    Sure, the 00/00 is a bit harder to explain. 



  • The real WTF are developers who cargo cult opinions.



  • @DaveK said:

    @tgape said:

    The 0000/00/00 bit is a bit trickier.  None of the traditional calendars I'm familiar with have a year 0000 <snip>  As such, I think you need a new calendar to pull that time off.

    Huh?  You've obviously never heard of the y10k problem.  See also RFC2550 don't think it's reasonable for people to be announcing events scheduled to happen 7990 years from now, but I think that could make this announcement more reasonable.

    Sure, the 00/00 is a bit harder to explain. 

    FTFY.  When trying to explain a WTF, it doesn't really help to suggest it's an even bigger WTF.  (It may be true, but it doesn't help us sleep easier at night.)

    For what it's worth, the implied calendar provided by POSIX time conversion utilities possibly has a loop on the year, as the standard apparently allows for but does not require returning NULL for year out of range, and the standard does not require that int be updated to more than 32 bits within the next 4 billion years.  It will probably happen, but there's an opening left.  Given that those are signed ints, the crisis date for that issue is, however, a mere 2 billion years away.

    Note: If you decide to plan a poker tournament to start significantly over 50 years from now, don't bother telling me, as I won't be attending.



  • Over 983,000 pixeltrees died to make that screenshot. Of something you already put in your post with 61 characters.



  • @tgape said:

    @DaveK said:

    @tgape said:

    The 0000/00/00 bit is a bit trickier.  None of the traditional calendars I'm familiar with have a year 0000 <snip>  As such, I think you need a new calendar to pull that time off.

    Huh?  You've obviously never heard of the y10k problem.  See also RFC2550 don't think it's reasonable for people to be announcing events scheduled to happen 7990 years from now, but I think that could make this announcement more reasonable.

    Sure, the 00/00 is a bit harder to explain. 

    FTFY.  When trying to explain a WTF, it doesn't really help to suggest it's an even bigger WTF.  (It may be true, but it doesn't help us sleep easier at night.)

      Holy crap, you think I actually thought they were announcing a tournament in the year 10k?  Pardon me for saying so, but, "Whooosh".


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @TwelveBaud said:

    Over 983,000 pixeltrees died to make that screenshot. Of something you already put in your post with 61 characters.
     

    You think that puny number of pixeltrees is going to make a dent?

    My framebuffers contain 9,216,000 pixels and are refreshed 72 times a second. That means in 1 minute my system consumes 39,813,120,000 pixeltrees. Lets not even begin to talk about how many rainforest trees it consumes through power draw (actually, this system runs off power derived from nuclear power stations, so the answer is actually 0 unless you want to start talking about the environmental impact of uranium mining)



  • @Weng said:

    Lets not even begin to talk about how many rainforest trees it consumes through power draw (actually, this system runs off power derived from nuclear power stations, so the answer is actually 0 unless you want to start talking about the environmental impact of uranium mining)

    Nuclear power, eh?  Where do you live?  Oh, and I doubt that any rainforests were clearcut for uranium mining.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    Maryland, north of Baltimore. Within pissing distance I have like 4 nuclear power stations, including TMI.



  • @Weng said:

    Maryland, north of Baltimore. Within pissing distance I have like 4 nuclear power stations, including TMI.

    Well, I'm glad I don't live in Baltimore, but unfortunately most of the power around here is coal.  There are plenty of half-baked wind farms in the works, though.  Should be quite effective at pissing away my tax dollars and increasing the cost of my electricity.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

     The plants are all along the Susquehanna, which is east of anywhere anyone cares about - and the prevailing wind direction would carry everything to the east. The only places in the line of fire are Philadelphia and New Jersey.

     

    When I was still at University, I took a night class in meteorology (stupid gen ed bullshit credits) and the instructor's day job was the on-staff meteorologist at one of the plants - his entire job consists of making meltdown forecasts - determining, for various size incidents ranging from "oops" to "Chernobyl", who needs to be evacuated based upon the current weather. Cool dude, learned a lot.



  • @Weng said:

    The plants are all along the Susquehanna, which is east of anywhere anyone cares about - and the prevailing wind direction would carry everything to the east. The only places in the line of fire are Philadelphia and New Jersey.

    Nuclear fallout might help improve Philly and Jersey.

     

    @Weng said:

    When I was still at University, I took a night class in meteorology (stupid gen ed bullshit credits) and the instructor's day job was the on-staff meteorologist at one of the plants - his entire job consists of making meltdown forecasts - determining, for various size incidents ranging from "oops" to "Chernobyl", who needs to be evacuated based upon the current weather. Cool dude, learned a lot.

    None of which would even be a problem if politics didn't interfere with the building of new, safer reactors to replace the aging dinosaurs that still are capable of melting down in the first place.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Weng said:

    When I was still at University, I took a night class in meteorology (stupid gen ed bullshit credits) and the instructor's day job was the on-staff meteorologist at one of the plants - his entire job consists of making meltdown forecasts - determining, for various size incidents ranging from "oops" to "Chernobyl", who needs to be evacuated based upon the current weather. Cool dude, learned a lot.

    None of which would even be a problem if politics didn't interfere with the building of new, safer reactors to replace the aging dinosaurs that still are capable of melting down in the first place.

    Or if we just didn't bother evacuating those places.



  • @bstorer said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @Weng said:

    When I was still at University, I took a night class in meteorology (stupid gen ed bullshit credits) and the instructor's day job was the on-staff meteorologist at one of the plants - his entire job consists of making meltdown forecasts - determining, for various size incidents ranging from "oops" to "Chernobyl", who needs to be evacuated based upon the current weather. Cool dude, learned a lot.

    None of which would even be a problem if politics didn't interfere with the building of new, safer reactors to replace the aging dinosaurs that still are capable of melting down in the first place.

    Or if we just didn't bother evacuating those places.

    As much as I'd love to agree, where are we going to put our chemical plants and other sources of noxious fumes if not NJ?  Who will maintain the NJTP?  Sadly, we need the people of New Jersey, just as the Alphas and Betas needed the Deltas and Epsilons.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Who will maintain the NJTP?
    That line of reasoning is based on the assumption that someone maintains it now.  This is only true if you consider "closing the entire highway during rush hour" to be maintenance.



  • @bstorer said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Who will maintain the NJTP?
    That line of reasoning is based on the assumption that someone maintains it now.  This is only true if you consider "closing the entire highway during rush hour" to be maintenance.

    There's some other definition of "maintenance"?  As I understood it, the highway is periodically shut down completely so that the North American Traffic Cone can return to its native habitat to spawn, thus allowing the propagation of these majestic creatures to continue for another generation.  Nature is so beautiful.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @bstorer said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Who will maintain the NJTP?
    That line of reasoning is based on the assumption that someone maintains it now.  This is only true if you consider "closing the entire highway during rush hour" to be maintenance.

    There's some other definition of "maintenance"?  As I understood it, the highway is periodically shut down completely so that the North American Traffic Cone can return to its native habitat to spawn, thus allowing the propagation of these majestic creatures to continue for another generation.  Nature is so beautiful.

    If you think that is touching, then take a trip through Pennsylvania some time and behold mile after mile of traffic barrel marching single-file bravely down a lane of the highway, right past the two workmen staring at a 2'x2' hole somewhere near the middle of this eleven mile march.  It's amazing that the barrels are clever enough to realize that the workmen wouldn't dare harm them, because that might constitute actual work.  It's adaptation at its finest.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @bstorer said:

    If you think that is touching, then take a trip through Pennsylvania some time and behold mile after mile of traffic barrel marching single-file bravely down a lane of the highway, right past the two workmen staring at a 2'x2' hole somewhere near the middle of this eleven mile march.  It's amazing that the barrels are clever enough to realize that the workmen wouldn't dare harm them, because that might constitute actual work.  It's adaptation at its finest.
    My little shithole corner of Pennsylvania rarely sees that particular sight - much more common is the sudden, abrupt onset of traffic cones with no warning, 50 feet in front of the work zone and immediate stoppage of the cones just before the end.

     

    Furthermore, we often get "rolling roadworks" (usually filling potholes with sand in some sort of retarded attempt to fix them) where PennDOTsticks a truck with a flashing arrow sign in the middle of the lane that's closed and hopes nobody rear-ends it. No advance warning at all, and DEFINITELY no cones. I've personally had a few near misses where I didn't realize that the truck was not moving.


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