Password Too Strong



  • Apparently my 16 character password was just too strong for GoDaddy to handle.




  • TRWTF is that it means they're probably storing it in a CHAR(14).



  •  @joemck said:

    TRWTF is that it means they're probably storing it in a CHAR(14).

    TRWTF is DES



  • Assume that 1234567 represents a reasonably obtuse string. I wanted to set my bank password to "1234567", but they gave me the error message "Password must be more than 7 characters." So I added an obvious acronym, tried "1234567fy" and got the error message "Password must be no more than 8 characters." That's why my password ends in "f".  Why doesn't anyone change both error messages to "Password must be exactly 8 characters"????? 



  • @AndyCanfield said:

    Assume that 1234567 represents a reasonably obtuse string. I wanted to set my bank password to "1234567", but they gave me the error message "Password must be more than 7 characters." So I added an obvious acronym, tried "1234567fy" and got the error message "Password must be no more than 8 characters." That's why my password ends in "f".  Why doesn't anyone change both error messages to "Password must be exactly 8 characters"????? 

    Don't ask me why, because I honestly almost broke my brain trying to understand his explanation, but a former employer of mine actually made me do idiotic stuff like that in a web application. I think he wanted people to be punished for not reading his (very badly written) e-mailed instructions to new customers: but one of the idiocies was password length. If you entered an (n) character password for n<6, he wanted it to say the password had to be longer than n characters. For n>6, shorter than n characters. Yeah, we were limiting to six character passwords.

    Oh, and I was written up for "being lazy" for doing it with a short function and string substitution, instead of an if-then ladder for 1 through 31 characters of length ...



  • @Wolftaur said:

    Oh, and I was written up for "being lazy" for doing it with a short function and string substitution, instead of an if-then ladder for 1 through 31 characters of length ...

    A lazy programmer is a good programmer. None-lazy programmers can make tons and tons of bad code, while lazy programmers only generate a bit of bad code.



  • @Daid said:

    A lazy programmer is a good programmer. None-lazy programmers can make tons and tons of bad code, while lazy programmers only generate a bit of bad code.

    If my ex-boss was stupid enough to lock himself in the supply closet about twice a month on average, you expect him to understand my job? :)



  • @Wolftaur said:

    If my ex-boss was stupid enough to lock himself in the supply closet about twice a month on average, you expect him to understand my job? :)
    This sounds like a problem that practically solves itself.



  • @Wolftaur said:

    my ex-boss was stupid enough to lock himself in the supply closet about twice a month on average
    Whoah I need a boss like your ex-boss.  Skipping out early on Friday Friday and Thursday every day would be a sinch



  • @Wolftaur said:

    @Daid said:
    A lazy programmer is a good programmer. None-lazy programmers can make tons and tons of bad code, while lazy programmers only generate a bit of bad code.
    If my ex-boss was stupid enough to lock himself in the supply closet about twice a month on average, you expect him to understand my job? :)

     

    Wait, you let him out?

    WHY?!?!



  • @KattMan said:

    @Wolftaur said:

    @Daid said:
    A lazy programmer is a good programmer. None-lazy programmers can make tons and tons of bad code, while lazy programmers only generate a bit of bad code.
    If my ex-boss was stupid enough to lock himself in the supply closet about twice a month on average, you expect him to understand my job? :)

     

    Wait, you let him out?

    WHY?!?!

    After about two weeks or so they need some supplies.


  • @KattMan said:

    @Wolftaur said:

    @Daid said:
    A lazy programmer is a good programmer. None-lazy programmers can make tons and tons of bad code, while lazy programmers only generate a bit of bad code.
    If my ex-boss was stupid enough to lock himself in the supply closet about twice a month on average, you expect him to understand my job? :)

     

    Wait, you let him out?

    WHY?!?!

     

    To hear him yell "SUPPLIES!"



  • @KattMan said:

    @Wolftaur said:

    If my ex-boss was stupid enough to lock himself in the supply closet about twice a month on average, you expect him to understand my job? :)

     

    Wait, you let him out?

    WHY?!?!

    Actually, I wasn't the one who'd let him out. It was the employees of the other business that rented office space as the same floor as us that would typically let him out, because his pounding on the wall and yelling was disruptive to their client conference room. :)

    For the four months I worked in that office, I think it was me who let him out once, and that time, well... He was my ride home.



  • @cconroy said:

    @KattMan said:

    Wait, you let him out?

    WHY?!?!

     

    To hear him yell "SUPPLIES!"

    Actually, one of the employees of another company on the same floor did once open the door, see him on the floor napping... They retrieved the toilet paper they were looking for, and locked him back in. Half the building heard about that and was laughing hysterically.



  • @Wolftaur said:

    Actually, one of the employees of another company on the same floor did once open the door, see him on the floor napping... They retrieved the toilet paper they were looking for, and locked him back in. Half the building heard about that and was laughing hysterically.
     

    What. The. Fuck.



  • @cconroy said:

    To hear him yell "SUPPLIES!"
     

    +1 reference noted; I see what you did there; Lolz.


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