Honest Adobe Reader



  • This seems to be a very honest appraisal by Adobe.

    An honest assesment



  •  I'm going to go out on a limb here and guess that the other more functional products are also Adobe products, rather than third party solutions such as FoxIt.



  • TRWTF is that Adobe Reader 9 breaks when %appdata% is a UNC path.



  • @Mole said:

     I'm going to go out on a limb here and guess that the other more functional products are also Adobe products, rather than third party solutions such as FoxIt.

    Nope, unless Adobe Reader 9 is more functional than Adobe Reader 9.



  •  Yes, it makes sense that you are install Adobe Reader 9 because you don't already have Adobe PDF 9 installed. If you did, that would a WTF in itself.

    One thing that always annoyed me about WinXP's "dos box" is it's inability to support unc paths. I sometimes drop to a "shell" when the gui isn't capable or just too damn annoying to do the task in hand, but forcing you to "c:\windows" when all the commands support unc paths is a big wtf in itself. 



  • @Mole said:

    One thing that always annoyed me about WinXP's "dos box" is it's inability to support unc paths.
    @pushd /? said:
    Stores the current directory for use by the POPD command, then
    changes to the specified directory.

    PUSHD [path | ..]

      path        Specifies the directory to make the current directory.

    If Command Extensions are enabled the PUSHD command accepts
    network paths in addition to the normal drive letter and path.
    If a network path is specified, PUSHD will create a temporary
    drive letter that points to that specified network resource and
    then change the current drive and directory, using the newly
    defined drive letter.  Temporary drive letters are allocated from
    Z: on down, using the first unused drive letter found.



  •  That doesn't help when you have an extension that gives the ability to spawn a command shell from anywhere, then when you need it, it tells you that you can't do it! 

    '\192.168.0.72\backups'
    CMD.EXE was started with the above path as the current directory.
    UNC paths are not supported.  Defaulting to Windows directory.
    Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
    (C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

    C:\WINDOWS> 




  • @Mole said:

     That doesn't help when you have an extension that gives the ability to spawn a command shell from anywhere, then when you need it, it tells you that you can't do it! 

    '\192.168.0.72\backups'
    CMD.EXE was started with the above path as the current directory.
    UNC paths are not supported.  Defaulting to Windows directory.
    Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
    (C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

    C:\WINDOWS> 

    ' <font face="courier new,courier">net use</font>' not solve this? (Presuming, of course, you don't run out of drive letters... )


  • It still doesn't let you have a UNC path as a current directory; it maps phantom drive letters to fake it. Try this (there is a free version). Your other options would be bash (from cygwin or mingw/msys) or powershell, both of which have learning curves.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Sir Twist said:

    powershell
    <3



  • @Mole said:

     That doesn't help when you have an extension that gives the ability to spawn a command shell from anywhere, then when you need it, it tells you that you can't do it! 

    You're referring to a right-click-on-folder, "Command Window Here" extension right? Maybe the one from PowerToys? Because you can just change it to use PUSHD.

    Go to HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\cmd\command

    Change

    cmd.exe /k "cd %L"

    Into

    cmd.exe /k "pushd %L"

    It will still complain, but it will also work!



  • The problem is that current directory in windows is kept 1) per process 2) also per each drive letter on that process. These are kept as environment varables. The code that converts short pathname to full path is in usermode. It needs the current drive letter to select which current path to use. I guess it's done for legacy reasons. This all boils down to: the current directory has to have a drve letter.

     



  • @alegr said:

    The problem is that current directory in windows is kept 1) per process 2) also per each drive letter on that process. These are kept as environment varables. The code that converts short pathname to full path is in usermode. It needs the current drive letter to select which current path to use. I guess it's done for legacy reasons.

    This was useful back in the MS-DOS days: set the current directory on one drive (say, B:), and you can copy or move files to it from another drive (say, A:) with less typing.



  • @Carnildo said:

    @alegr said:
    The problem is that current directory in windows is kept 1) per process 2) also per each drive letter on that process. These are kept as environment varables. The code that converts short pathname to full path is in usermode. It needs the current drive letter to select which current path to use. I guess it's done for legacy reasons.

    This was useful back in the MS-DOS days: set the current directory on one drive (say, B:), and you can copy or move files to it from another drive (say, A:) with less typing.

    I still find it useful, for the same reason.



  •  Hey thanks, that looks like it'll do exactly the thing I want it to do :-)

     I wonder if MS will ever drop drive letters; I'm thinking probably not over worries about compatability problems. They keep coming up with new file systems, and then dropping them way before the first beta release of a new os. 


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