Get ready for the next bs buzzword



  • It's started already. The latest and greatest thing that every "enterprise" needs is an "Enterprise Service Bus" of course! And of course the only true ESB out there is the product created by the company that coined the term! Get ready. I expect hundreds upon hundreds of PHB related WTF-ery from this one.





  • It's actually Sonic ESB. Not Cape Clear. I'm sure Cape Clear is just as WTF.



  • It's a proven ESB that delivers enterprise SOA projects in 20% of the time and cost of alternative approaches. It provides capabilities spanning service creation through sophisticated service orchestration via native BPEL support, to enable organizations to easily map their IT infrastructure to their business processes.

    To sum up...  it's pretty nifty and everyone should have one (or a couple).  How can you not get excited about that?? [:P]



  • @bullseye said:

    It's a proven ESB that delivers
    enterprise SOA projects in 20% of the time and cost of alternative
    approaches. It provides capabilities spanning service creation through
    sophisticated service orchestration via native BPEL support, to enable
    organizations to easily map their IT infrastructure to their business
    processes.

    To sum up...  it's pretty nifty and everyone should have one (or a couple).  How can you not get excited about that?? [:P]


    You can't not get excited about this, unless you're not a lobotomized marketing zombie...

    (Yes. That's a quadruple negation. No, I didn't do that on purpose, I only noticed until after I wrote that sentence. That is just the way my brain works.)


  • @bullseye said:

    It's a proven ESB that delivers enterprise SOA projects in 20% of the time and cost of alternative approaches. It provides capabilities spanning service creation through sophisticated service orchestration via native BPEL support, to enable organizations to easily map their IT infrastructure to their business processes.

    To sum up...  it's pretty nifty and everyone should have one (or a couple).  How can you not get excited about that?? [:P]


    It even comes with a plentify supply of purple cool-aid for the faithful.  Just in case you miss your ride on the comet.


  • WTF is with sites that put product information on their websites in PDF files instead of web pages? Does making your information harder to read somehow make it more enterprise? I wouldn't bother to ask if it was only companies like Capeclear that are selling total nonsense, but I've seen the same thing from legitimate companies.



  • I love companies that make you sign up to read their documentation now. Some don't even let you look at their support information without a paid account.What a joy that is. If I had any say in what software was purchased those kind of companies would be off the list immediately.



  • My Eyes are bleeding



  • ESB, in this context, appears to mean "IDE for a custom WTF language".

    I'm impressed that in the entire first paragraph they managed to avoid the use of anything which might give-away what the product actually does.

    To complete the picture, it really needs a "5000" in the title somewhere, like Cape Clear 5000 (tm).



  • That's the thing. Does anyone out there know wtf an ESB actually IS? Sounds like it's a bunch of garbage made up by some marketer to extract money from idiots.



  • m_lLayersOfAbstraction++;



  • @Zak said:

    WTF is with sites that put product information on their websites in PDF files instead of web pages?




    For the same reason many web designers use Dreamweaver. Or Flash. We
    all know that rounded boxes and slick fonts are far more important than
    the actual information passed on by the document... :D



  • @maniac78 said:

    That's the thing. Does anyone out there know wtf an ESB actually IS? Sounds like it's a bunch of garbage made up by some marketer to extract money from idiots.



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_Service_Bus



  • This is even more amusing if you're french, in which case you've probably heard of 'ESB' in the news, since for us it stands for "encéphalie spongiforme bovine", a.k.a mad cow disease



  • Basically, it's a centralized message passing server.  Instead of two applications talking directly to each other, one sends a well-defined message to the ESB server, which can do some processing and routing to the other. I won't say I don't see times where the additional level of indirection can be useful [I'm in the design section of a project NOW that it might in handy for], but it also adds an additional point of failure, latency, and additional processing time for conversion between the IDL that the message-sender sends and an IDL that the ESB understands.  You know, standard problems that adding an additional level of indirection always adds.

    It can be useful, however, if you have a lot of... programmers that you don't want to spend time learning about the other systems, since they only need a library to talk to the single IDL that the ESB uses [usually XML, to be fully buzzword compliant], or if you have messages you want to do centralized processing on that come from more than one system.  My company has a lot of psuedo-programmers that have to talk to systems I design, and a centralized bus would make it easier for them to talk to my systems [right now, I end up writing lots of client libraries for them because many of them think loading a DLL or sending XML over a socket is too hard].

    I don't see it living up to the level of hype that it generates, because the companies that sell these 'solutions' want every single data transaction between two systems to pass through it, which is completely unneeded in most cases. [I think this is to sell more licenses, because you need more hardware to handle the transactions].  Furthermore, as the centralized message processing becomes more complex... why did you buy an application server in the first place?  However, 'integration analysts' claim that every SQL request and every open piece of data should come through their server instead of a direct connection.



  • @Ezekiel said:

    This is even more amusing if you're french, in which case you've probably heard of 'ESB' in the news, since for us it stands for "encéphalie spongiforme bovine", a.k.a mad cow disease


    Well, they both will rot the brain over time, heh.

    In all honesty, these things remind me of that IBM commercial where they say there's no such thing as a universal connector that will connect all of your old and new systems, and then they tell you that they'll sell you one anyway. Painful.



  • @Zak said:

    WTF is with sites that put product information on
    their websites in PDF files instead of web pages? Does making your
    information harder to read somehow make it more enterprise? I wouldn't
    bother to ask if it was only companies like Capeclear that are selling
    total nonsense, but I've seen the same thing from legitimate companies.




    In most cases, they use the same input (a document made in Xpress, Indesign etc.) also used for printed brochures.


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