So I'm going to get an email ... or a post-letter?



  • Yay for confusing instructions...

    I don't know if it is helpful to mention that this was from the world's largest (by market cap and usage) commercial operating systems vendor's website, but, one would think they would know how to differentiate between post and electronic mail...



  • Obviously they're going to print out your welcome e-mail, put in on a wooden table, take a photograph of it (with an old film camera) and send you an envelope containing the photo.

    (Seriously, they're of course referring to the e-mail field near the bottom of the form.  It just would've been less confusing if they'd put the note next to the field.)



  • It's a simple process, really:

    1. Type welcome email

    2. Print screen

    3. Attach printout to wooden table

    4. Ship wooden table to specified address 

    This takes things to a whole new level.



  • Ok, so if I'm getting an email confirmation for a purely electronic delivery, with no selections made for physical media of any kind, and from the world's largest software vendor (so they say):

    Why is my postal address REQUIRED? Especially when I'm already registered at least a dozen ways in their system (Partner, MAP, Live, etc, etc)



  • @cconroy said:

    It's a simple process, really:
     

    Sorry vyznev, I must remember to refresh the page before replying.  (I like my method better, though.)



  •  @drachenstern said:

    Ok, so if I'm getting an email confirmation for a purely electronic delivery, with no selections made for physical media of any kind, and from the world's largest software vendor (so they say):

    Why is my postal address REQUIRED? Especially when I'm already registered at least a dozen ways in their system (Partner, MAP, Live, etc, etc)

    Because a lot of credit card vendors check the entered address against the one they have on-record for the cardholder. Bank of America (used to, at least) does this with their debit cards. Presumably the next step was payment information.



  • @blakeyrat said:

    Because a lot of credit card vendors check the entered address against the one they have on-record for the cardholder. Bank of America (used to, at least) does this with their debit cards. Presumably the next step was payment information.
    Very good catch. See, this is why I ask WTF instead of just commenting to myself and going onwards. That probably IS the case in this instance, as the cost for me was "$0" (yay promos) so there was no payment step, but that was likely it.

    I'm sure the entirety of the system is setup to not deviate from the standard workflow (which is what you seem to be thinking, if I understand your thought process from a few brief sentences) and so the only question I have left is why would they differentiate the email portion at the top of the window, instead of mating it to the field, as was mentioned previously.

    Ah well, such is life. On to the next WTF.



  • @drachenstern said:

    @blakeyrat said:

    Because a lot of credit card vendors check the entered address against the one they have on-record for the cardholder. Bank of America (used to, at least) does this with their debit cards. Presumably the next step was payment information.
    Very good catch. See, this is why I ask WTF instead of just commenting to myself and going onwards. That probably IS the case in this instance, as the cost for me was "$0" (yay promos) so there was no payment step, but that was likely it.

    I'm sure the entirety of the system is setup to not deviate from the standard workflow (which is what you seem to be thinking, if I understand your thought process from a few brief sentences) and so the only question I have left is why would they differentiate the email portion at the top of the window, instead of mating it to the field, as was mentioned previously.

    Ah well, such is life. On to the next WTF.

     

    I was just commenting on the previous post (why would they need an address?), not the WTF in general. You're right, it's still a WTF, since the copy is completely wrong.


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