If you forgot your password, please contact...



  • Who can remember all of the passwords we use for all the different sites we visit? I didn't remember this particular password, so I clicked on the "forgot password" link and got this. Pretty much says it all... 

    <FONT size=3>"Forgot Your Password?</FONT>

    If you forgot your password, please contact your system administrator for assistance at ."

     



  •  This is pretty helpful, you just need to reach the .



  • I think you're just reading it wrong. It's meant to be read: "...please contact your system administrator at space."

    Clearly the system administrator is in orbit somewhere.



  • @snoofle said:

    contact your system administrator for assistance at .

    Well, according to handling of relative URLs, . means "relative to this directory". Assuming you got this error at http://domain.com/foo then . would mean domain.com (since in an email context, the URL prefix and slashes are irrelevant). So now all you need to do is to work out what the local part is. They seem to be using written "at" to avoid spam crawlers. So whatever's before it would be the local part. So it becomes:

    assistance@domain.com

    Or it might be that "your system administrator for assistance" is the local part. The spaces are permitted as long as the local part is quoted, so it becomes:

    "your system administrator for assistance"@domain.com

    Or perhaps they want you to remove the spaces, or replace them with underscores. Guess I'll leave to you to experiment with that one.

    See, aren't I helpful? :P </sarcasm>



  • @snoofle said:

    Who can remember all of the passwords we use for all the different sites we visit?
    I only have to remember one password anymore. I started using KeePass.



  • Maybe the sysadmin is Candlejack.  That would explain th


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @TarquinWJ said:

    since in an email context, the URL prefix and slashes are irrelevant)
    Incorrect. The "URL prefix" is actually a legitimate domain name. For example I am root@kefka.redacted.redacted.com - your interpretation requires the full domain name, not just the TLD and primary domain.



  • @Sir Twist said:

    I only have to remember one password anymore. I started using KeePass.

     

    How does this differ from the "remember password" feature in most browsers?



  • Just to name a few:

    1. You put the portable version on a USB stick and use it anywhere with a compatible PC.
    2. AES encrypted, so more secure.
    3. The browser feature doesn't do much good for logging in to (for example) MS Terminal Services.
    4. Customized password entry patterns, which let you "remember" more than just a password (e.g. shift-tab, enter username, tab, enter password, press enter, for the aforementioned MSTS).
    5. Secure password generator, which can give you the maximum security possible despite whatever brain-dead restrictions the password rules impose.



  • @Weng said:

    @TarquinWJ said:
    since in an email context, the URL prefix and slashes are irrelevant)
    Incorrect. The "URL prefix" is actually a legitimate domain name.

    Given the example URL was "http://domain.com/foo", I do not see how a reasonable person could think that 'URL prefix' was meant to refer to anything other than the 'URL prefix', which in this case is 'http://'.  That is not useful for an email address, as TarquinWJ indicated.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    ... My bad. I'm apparently TOTALLY AWESOME at actually reading.



  • @tgape said:

    @Weng said:
    @TarquinWJ said:
    since in an email context, the URL prefix and slashes are irrelevant)
    Incorrect. The "URL prefix" is actually a legitimate domain name.
    Given the example URL was "http://domain.com/foo", I do not see how a reasonable person could think that 'URL prefix' was meant to refer to anything other than the 'URL prefix', which in this case is 'http://'.  That is not useful for an email address, as TarquinWJ indicated.
    I never call that the "URL Prefix."  I call it the protocol declaration.  I'm strange like that.



  • @fourchan said:

    Maybe the sysadmin is Candlejack.  That would explain th
    Oh, God, they're everywhere...



  • @belgariontheking said:

    I never call that the "URL Prefix."  I call it the protocol declaration.  I'm strange like that.
    The spec calls it "the scheme."



  • @TwelveBaud said:

    @belgariontheking said:

    I never call that the "URL Prefix."  I call it the protocol declaration.  I'm strange like that.
    The spec calls it "the scheme."

    Not quite. "http" is the scheme, but ":" and "//" are literal and have no name.


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