Fast Half Marathon




  • Despite coming in 5087 places behind the leader, this half marathon runner was able to somehow set a new course record by well over an hour.

    clicky

    http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/2729/fastrace.jpg screenshot in case they fixed it



  • Not to mention he would go to jail for a long time if the cops would've got him. I mean, I don't know how it's in the US but here in Holland you could go to jail if you break the speed limit with 30 km/h (19 mph), what would you get for going 380 km/h (240 mph) faster than the speed limit on a highway? (500 km/h /310 mph)



  • The real wtf is that to me that sign says: 2 minutes, 30.00 seconds.

    Unless this place uses a different separator (dot instead of colon) between minutes and seconds than between hours and minutes. But then what do they use between seconds and hundredths?



  • You have to be careful when reading things. As it turns out, "minuntes" are equivalent to 75 minutes each, so really a time of 2 minuntes and 30 seconds isn't all that great.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @Thief^ said:

    2 minutes, 30.00 seconds.
    That's a 'middle dot' in the photo, not a period.@Thief^ said:
    Unless this place uses a different separator (dot instead of colon) between minutes and seconds than between hours and minutes. But then what do they use between seconds and hundredths?
    A dot?

    That said, it's more likely to be some sort of WTF by the person programming the display, and it should have been two colons.

     



  • @PJH said:

    @Thief^ said:

    2 minutes, 30.00 seconds.
    That's a 'middle dot' in the photo, not a period.

    From your own "middle dot" link: "It is also used as a decimal point, e.g. 7·85, although this usage has declined in recent decades."

    Hence my assumption that it was a decimal point, as I haven't seen it used for anything else in numbers.

    EDIT: Like this: 2 minutes, 30·00 seconds.



  • @dtech said:

    Not to mention he would go to jail for a long time if the cops would've got him. I mean, I don't know how it's in the US but here in Holland you could go to jail if you break the speed limit with 30 km/h (19 mph), what would you get for going 380 km/h (240 mph) faster than the speed limit on a highway? (500 km/h /310 mph)

     

    In the U.S., you could go to jail if you go far over the limit (I don't know exactly what the cutoff is - certainly if you go 100+ on a 65mph freeway). But 19mph over the limit in most places would just get you a speeding ticket.

    How strict are they in Holland if you're just slightly over the limit? Here, everybody drives 5mph over the limit (even police officers) and nobody will pull you over for it.

     



  • @dtech said:

    Not to mention he would go to jail for a long time if the cops would've got him. I mean, I don't know how it's in the US but here in Holland you could go to jail if you break the speed limit with 30 km/h (19 mph), what would you get for going 380 km/h (240 mph) faster than the speed limit on a highway? (500 km/h /310 mph)

     

    Doesn't the limit apply only to drivers, rather than walkers?



  • @Huf Lungdung said:

    How strict are they in Holland if you're just slightly over the limit? Here, everybody drives 5mph over the limit (even police officers) and nobody will pull you over for it.

    First you get a 3% correction. Then they send you a ticket (pulling over generally only happens at 30+ km/h too fast) if you were 4 km/h over the limit. That means you could get a ticket if you drive 56 km/h in a 50 km/h zone (it's only €19 though)

    The fine rises until +- €200 at 30 km/h too fast (thats about 19 mph). Any faster than that and it becomes a crime (instead of an offence) and a criminal attorney attends to it. You usually get a spicy ticket (I know someone who drove 40 too fast and got €500) and sometimes a conditional (that is: you only get it if you drive way too fast again. "voorwaardelijk", don't know the exact english word for it)  penalty like jail time or losing you license for a period of time. You also lose your license until the attorney has decided on the punishment.

    If you drive faster than 40 (in city's) or 50 (outside) you usually lose your license (for a period of time) and sometimes have to do jail time.



  • Doesn't the limit apply only to drivers, rather than walkers?
    It applies to both, just walkers usually never reach those speeds.



  • @dtech said:

    Not to mention he would go to jail for a long time if the cops would've got him. I mean, I don't know how it's in the US but here in Holland you could go to jail if you break the speed limit with 30 km/h (19 mph), what would you get for going 380 km/h (240 mph) faster than the speed limit on a highway? (500 km/h /310 mph)

     

     Don't the police have to catch you first?  If you could run this fast, I don't think you'd ever get a ticket, never mind get caught for anything.  You're getting close to outrunning some projectiles at that speed.

    I wonder what breaking the sound barrier with your whole body feels like?



  • @dtech said:

    "voorwaardelijk", don't know the exact english word for it)  penalty like jail time or losing you license for a period of time.
     

     translator says that means 'conditional'

    i think that would be similar to a suspended sentence / good behaviour bond.



  • @Daemo said:

    @dtech said:

    "voorwaardelijk", don't know the exact english word for it)  penalty like jail time or losing you license for a period of time.
     

     translator says that means 'conditional'

    i think that would be similar to a suspended sentence / good behaviour bond.

     

    Around here a "conditional license" means that you can only drive your car between certain places (for example your place of work and home). A friend of mine had one of those because he got too many speeding tickets but as there was no real public transport in that city he'd lose his job if he had no license... It would be similar to the good behaviour bond but with extra restrictions.



  • @lolwtf said:

    Doesn't the limit apply only to drivers, rather than walkers?
    It applies to both, just walkers usually never reach those speeds.
    It applies to drivers of motorized vehicles. I know someone who got on caught on a speeding camera riding his bicycle over 30Km/h trough a 30Km zone, but he didn't get a ticket.


  • Discourse touched me in a no-no place

    @shepd said:

    I wonder what breaking the sound barrier with your whole body feels like?
    Well we were actually going to find out, but a rather expensive WTF occurred.



  • @Daid said:

    It applies to drivers of motorized vehicles. I know someone who got on caught on a speeding camera riding his bicycle over 30Km/h trough a 30Km zone, but he didn't get a ticket.
     

    Depends on where you are.  Where I am, bicycles are legally considered vehicles, and as such are subject to all the same laws as other vehicles (with a few exceptions like sidewalk bike routes where there are no dedicated bike lanes)--including the speed limit. 

    Mind, I've never heard of the police around here enforcing the speed limit against a cyclist, but in theory they could.



  • @Huf Lungdung said:

    In the U.S., you could go to jail if you go far over the limit (I don't know exactly what the cutoff is - certainly if you go 100+ on a 65mph freeway).

    There is no national speed limit in the US and penalties vary by state.  I routinely drive over 100 in 65 zones when most other drivers around me are and I've never been pulled over.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @Huf Lungdung said:

    In the U.S., you could go to jail if you go far over the limit (I don't know exactly what the cutoff is - certainly if you go 100+ on a 65mph freeway).

    There is no national speed limit in the US and penalties vary by state.  I routinely drive over 100 in 65 zones when most other drivers around me are and I've never been pulled over.

     

    I live in Phoenix, AZ. Here, it made the news when some famous rapper did 110 mph on one of the freeways. He got a few months jail time for it (although I think they said he was a repeat offender).

    Where are you? Sounds like a terribly dangrous place to drive.



  • @Huf Lungdung said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @Huf Lungdung said:

    In the U.S., you could go to jail if you go far over the limit (I don't know exactly what the cutoff is - certainly if you go 100+ on a 65mph freeway).

    There is no national speed limit in the US and penalties vary by state.  I routinely drive over 100 in 65 zones when most other drivers around me are and I've never been pulled over.

     

    I live in Phoenix, AZ. Here, it made the news when some famous rapper did 110 mph on one of the freeways. He got a few months jail time for it (although I think they said he was a repeat offender).

    Where are you? Sounds like a terribly dangrous place to drive.

     

    That was DMX and he was in trouble for a lot more than speeding.



  • @Huf Lungdung said:

    Here, everybody drives 5mph over the limit (even police officers) and nobody will pull you over for it.

    Well, TRWTF is that pretty much everyone agrees that most of the speed limits in the US are unreasonably low (thus, why you're able to get away with exceeding them as much as you are), but they haven't really changed all that much.

    For example, there's a 15 mph zone on a three lanes in each direction highway within 5 miles of where I live.  Note that, if you're going north-bound, there's a 35 mph zone on either side of the 15 mph zone before any on or off ramps.  (Technically, same is true for south-bound, but I believe that big toll plaza partially legitimizes the low speed limit.)



  • @dtech said:

    You usually get a spicy ticket (I know someone who drove 40 too fast and got €500) and sometimes a conditional (that is: you only get it if you drive way too fast again. "voorwaardelijk", don't know the exact english word for it)  penalty like jail time or losing you license for a period of time. You also lose your license until the attorney has decided on the punishment.

    I think the term you're looking for is 'conditionally suspended sentence'.  Note that this answer comes to you courtesy of a combination of Night Court and Google, so YMMV.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    There is no national speed limit in the US and penalties vary by state.  I routinely drive over 100 in 65 zones when most other drivers around me are and I've never been pulled over.
     

    Don't they have speed camera's where you live?



  • @dtech said:


    @morbiuswilters said:

    There is no national speed limit in the
    US and penalties vary by state.  I routinely drive over 100 in 65 zones
    when most other drivers around me are and I've never been pulled
    over.
     

    Don't they have speed camera's where you live?

    Speed cameras aren't legal everywhere.  ISTR the Michigan State Police tried them years ago but got slapped down by the state courts, on several grounds.



  • @dtech said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    There is no national speed limit in the US and penalties vary by state.  I routinely drive over 100 in 65 zones when most other drivers around me are and I've never been pulled over.
     

    Don't they have speed camera's where you live?

    I've never seen them, nor been hit with a ticket after the fact.



  • @Huf Lungdung said:

    Where are you? Sounds like a terribly dangrous place to drive.

    Massachusetts, but you'd be hard-pressed to get over 90 here due to congestion.  Most times I've topped 100 were in Illinois, Missouri, Texas (God bless 80 MPH speed limits), Louisiana and Mississippi.  Besides, high speeds aren't particularly dangerous if you are on a clear stretch of road or the rest of traffic is moving the same speed.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Most times I've topped 100 were in Illinois, Missouri, Texas (God bless 80 MPH speed limits), Louisiana and Mississippi. 
    All places that should be fled as quickly as one's car can manage.



  • @bstorer said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Most times I've topped 100 were in Illinois, Missouri, Texas (God bless 80 MPH speed limits), Louisiana and Mississippi. 
    All places that should be fled as quickly as one's car can manage.

     

    No shit!  I have seen the movie Deliverance, but I had never immagined how crazy Misouri was until I drove through there on vacation one year.  It's almost like a 3rd world country.



  • @amischiefr said:

    No shit!  I have seen the movie Deliverance, but I had never immagined
    how crazy Misouri was until I drove through there on vacation one
    year.  It's almost like a 3rd world country.

    lol. The half-marathon in question is actually in St. Louis.  Maybe that's why he was so fast, he was trying to flee Missouri. 



  •  @amischiefr said:

    @bstorer said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Most times I've topped 100 were in Illinois, Missouri, Texas (God bless 80 MPH speed limits), Louisiana and Mississippi. 
    All places that should be fled as quickly as one's car can manage.

     

    No shit!  I have seen the movie Deliverance, but I had never immagined how crazy Misouri was until I drove through there on vacation one year.  It's almost like a 3rd world country.

    what the fuck are you talking about?  Deliverance had nothing to do with Missouri, and there are very few places in Missouri that are really that redneck.  Some parts of southeast Missouri are a little sketchy, but for the most part it's a farming state with a good deal of manufacturing spread around.  

    I grew up in Missouri, and it's not that I'm just defensive about it, but I really have no fucking clue what you are talking about.  If you drove through it I'd assume you drove along I-44 or I-70.  If you drove from north-south (Kansas City to Springfield) you would have been on 13 which is almost all farming communities.  

     So, what did you do when you drove through?  Did you take side trips to remote villages in the southeast?  

     

    On a side note:   Some of the remote roads in the Ozarks (very south Missouri and north Arkansas) do have some houses which look like they are from Deliverance.



  • @tster said:

     @amischiefr said:

    @bstorer said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    Most times I've topped 100 were in Illinois, Missouri, Texas (God bless 80 MPH speed limits), Louisiana and Mississippi. 
    All places that should be fled as quickly as one's car can manage.

     

    No shit!  I have seen the movie Deliverance, but I had never immagined how crazy Misouri was until I drove through there on vacation one year.  It's almost like a 3rd world country.

    what the fuck are you talking about?  Deliverance had nothing to do with Missouri, and there are very few places in Missouri that are really that redneck.  Some parts of southeast Missouri are a little sketchy, but for the most part it's a farming state with a good deal of manufacturing spread around.  

    I grew up in Missouri, and it's not that I'm just defensive about it, but I really have no fucking clue what you are talking about.  If you drove through it I'd assume you drove along I-44 or I-70.  If you drove from north-south (Kansas City to Springfield) you would have been on 13 which is almost all farming communities.  

     So, what did you do when you drove through?  Did you take side trips to remote villages in the southeast?  

     

    On a side note:   Some of the remote roads in the Ozarks (very south Missouri and north Arkansas) do have some houses which look like they are from Deliverance.

     

    Well that's exactly what I was doing.  We were heading from the nearest airport (Little Rock) that we could fly into, through the  Ozarks to Branson.  And yes, I know Deliverance was West Vir, but you can't tell me that the drive from Little Rock to Branson wasn't that fucked up.  I drove it.  Maybe one of those houses was your ma and pa so you're a little defensive, but that really doesn't change the facts now does it?



  • @bstorer said:

    All places that should be fled as quickly as one's car can manage.
    Pfft! That's just the speed cameras where you and I live talking. And the 35MPH speed limit on the GW Parkway.


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