It's Ship Has Come In (Dr. Dobbs)



  • So I realize that, not only do I make plenty of typos and mistakes, but that I'm basically kicking a dead horse here... but I thought I'd share anyway. Here's a recent (the last? second last?) Dr. Dobbs... I'm sure we've all used the wrong "its" before, but not many have done so on the cover of a print magazine.



  • Editors tend to be pretty sharp people.  I wonder if this is a case of "I know which word is proper but because the improper word is used so frequently it will raise more eyebrows to write the proper one than the improper one".  If your 5th grade teacher keeps marking "The dog barked at my friend and me" as wrong, then just give in and write "my friend and I".



  • @AlpineR said:

    If your 5th grade teacher keeps marking "The dog barked at my friend and me" as wrong, then just give in and write "my friend and I".
    People like that are the reason I always write things like "I and my peers worked on this assignment" whenever appropriate. I love it when people think it's wrong.



  • @AlpineR said:

    If your 5th grade teacher keeps marking "The dog barked at my friend and me" as wrong, then just give in and write "my friend and I".

    That teacher should be fired for marking it wrong.  Knowing when to use me or I has always made me happy.



  • Obviously they're referring to "Information technology" and how the field will be affected by Functional Programming. TRWTF is failing to properly capitalize the "t" in "IT".



  •  When I got this issue in the mail (it gets sent to my parents' house) I showed the cover to my mom, and she was not amused.  (She majored in English Literature in college.)



  •  I didn't think I'd ever see Alex posting a sidebar WTF, but, I agree, that is the wrong "it's", it should've been "its".



  •  [url=http://www.ericsink.com/entries/rip_dr_dobbs.html]According to Eric Sink[/url] (who, by the way, noticed and posted this two months ago), it was the last issue.



  • @Welbog said:

    People like that are the reason I always write things like "I and my peers worked on this assignment" whenever appropriate. I love it when people think it's wrong.
    WRONG.

    RIGHT: "My peers and I worked on this assignment"



  •  @Welbog said:

    People like that are the reason I always write things like "I and my peers worked on this assignment" whenever appropriate. I love it when people think it's wrong.

    Needs more passive voice and cumbersome constructions: "With my peers, this assignment was worked on by me."



  • @ZPedro said:

     According to Eric Sink (who, by the way, noticed and posted this two months ago), it was the last issue.

    Yes, but did Eric Sink use a wooden table? I think not!



  • @Welbog said:

    "I and my peers worked on this assignment"

    In Czenglish: "We worked on this assignment with my peers".  Grr!



  • @Xanthus179 said:

    That teacher should be fired for marking it wrong.  Knowing when to use me or I has always made me happy.

    But if you correct it to "The dog barked at me and my friend", most such teachers would figure it out and never do that to anyone else again.

    If you can't do it right, do it wrong in a way that reveals the problem.

    Kind of like if your program leaks heap, but you don't know what it's leaking or where. Start your program, and leave it running for days. Then go in and grab any random object from the heap. Chances are it's what you're leaking.



  • @TwelveBaud said:

    @Welbog said:
    People like that are the reason I always write things like "I and my peers worked on this assignment" whenever appropriate. I love it when people think it's wrong.
    WRONG.

    RIGHT: "My peers and I worked on this assignment"

    Hey, it's one of those people I like who think it's wrong! There is a difference between convention and correctness. Do some research before making an ass of yourself.



  • @bstorer said:

     @Welbog said:

    People like that are the reason I always write things like "I and my peers worked on this assignment" whenever appropriate. I love it when people think it's wrong.

    Needs more passive voice and cumbersome constructions: "With my peers, this assignment was worked on by me."

    You lose points for not starting and ending with a preposition: "By me, with my peers, this assignment was worked on." 



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @bstorer said:

     @Welbog said:

    People like that are the reason I always write things like "I and my peers worked on this assignment" whenever appropriate. I love it when people think it's wrong.

    Needs more passive voice and cumbersome constructions: "With my peers, this assignment was worked on by me."

    You lose points for not starting and ending with a preposition "By me, with my peers, this assignment was worked on." 

     

    Let's shove some adverbs into that verb structure:  "By me, with my peers, this assignment was often worked furiously on."



  • @bstorer said:

    Let's shove some adverbs into that verb structure:  "By me, with my peers, this assignment was often worked furiously on."

    And some contradicting constructs and tense confusion: "By only me, but also with my peers, this assignment was then often worked furiously on."



  • @Alex Papadimoulis said:

    @bstorer said:

    Let's shove some adverbs into that verb structure:  "By me, with my beers, this assignment was often worked furiously on."

    And some contradicting constructs and tense confusion: "By only me, but also with my beers, this assignment was then often worked furiously on."

     

    Also, not enough past tense.

    By only me, but also with my beers, this assignment had then often been worked furiously on.



  • @DOA said:

    @ZPedro said:

     According to Eric Sink (who, by the way, noticed and posted this two months ago), it was the last issue.

    Yes, but did Eric Sink use a wooden table? I think not!
     

    Functional programming:  Did IT's wooden ship sink? 



  • @PSWorx said:

    @Alex Papadimoulis said:

    @bstorer said:

    Let's shove some adverbs into that verb structure:  "By me, with my beers, this assignment was often worked furiously on."

    And some contradicting constructs and tense confusion: "By only me, but also with my beers, this assignment was then often worked furiously on."

     

    Also, not enough past tense.

    By only me, but also with my beers, this assignment had then often been worked furiously on.

    How do I and my beers worked on assignment? 



  •  I found out yesterday that the iPhone "corrects" its to it's.  Thanks, Steve Jobs.



  • @vt_mruhlin said:

    I found out yesterday that the iPhone "corrects" its to it's.  Thanks, Steve Jobs.

    The man is dying of cancer.  I think we can forgive a grammatical error.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @vt_mruhlin said:

    I found out yesterday that the iPhone "corrects" its to it's.  Thanks, Steve Jobs.

    The man is dying of cancer.  I think we can forgive a grammatical error.

    Only if he's dying of cancer of the grammar gland.  Otherwise, I propose we poison him.  Or, to be more on-topic: with you by me Steve Jobs's drinking supply had posion mixed in.



  • @CDarklock said:

    Kind of like if your program leaks heap, but you don't know what it's leaking or where. Start your program, and leave it running for days. Then go in and grab any random object from the heap. Chances are it's what you're leaking.
    Or you could use _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks like everybody else



  • @bstorer said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @vt_mruhlin said:

    I found out yesterday that the iPhone "corrects" its to it's.  Thanks, Steve Jobs.

    The man is dying of cancer.  I think we can forgive a grammatical error.

    Only if he's dying of cancer of the grammar gland.  Otherwise, I propose we poison him.  Or, to be more on-topic: with you by me Steve Jobs's drinking supply had posion mixed in.
    That's not bad grammar, that's just postfix notation!  In RPN:  (you me poison drinking-supply Steve-Jobs owned-by mixed-in by with).



  • @Welbog said:

    Hey, it's one of those people I like who think it's wrong! There is a difference between convention and correctness. Do some research before making an ass of yourself.
    I blame my former English teachers, who went through one red pen per assignment marking things exactly like that. In their view, convention was correctness and any disagreement got you a 0 on the assignment and a referral to the principal. They also didn't like "colour", "generalise", or "Manichean guilt." Until I saw them in published texts, I thought they were wrong too, as I had been taught.



  • @TwelveBaud said:

    I blame my former English teachers, who went through one red pen per assignment marking things exactly like that. In their view, convention was correctness and any disagreement got you a 0 on the assignment and a referral to the principal.
    Those bastards.  I bet they wanted you to never split infinitives and thought that ending a sentence with a preposition was something to be ashamed of.



  •  @Welbog said:

    @TwelveBaud said:
    @Welbog said:
    People like that are the reason I always write things like "I and my peers worked on this assignment" whenever appropriate. I love it when people think it's wrong.
    WRONG.

    RIGHT: "My peers and I worked on this assignment"

    Hey, it's one of those people I like who think it's wrong! There is a difference between convention and correctness. Do some research before making an ass of yourself.

    So according to your link it's not incorrect it's just impolite, but that isn't surprising. Thanks for the lesson.

     



  • @TwelveBaud said:

    They also didn't like "colour", "generalise", or "Manichean guilt." Until I saw them in published texts, I thought they were wrong too, as I had been taught.

    You spelled "color" and "generalize" incorrectly.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @TwelveBaud said:

    They also didn't like "colour", "generalise", or "Manichean guilt." Until I saw them in published texts, I thought they were wrong too, as I had been taught.

    You spelled "color" and "generalize" incorrectly.

     

    You're right about "generalize" being spelt incorrectly because -ize is etymologically correct, but "colour" is a valid variant <sarcasm>even though it is mainly used in evil Communist Socialist countries like Canada</sarcasm>.



  • @samanddeanus said:

    evil Communist Socialist
    The only thing worse than an evil socialist is an evil communist socialist!



  • @Welbog said:

    @samanddeanus said:

    evil Communist Socialist
    The only thing worse than an evil socialist is an evil communist socialist!

    What about evil communist capitalists?



  • @Spectre said:

    @Welbog said:

    @samanddeanus said:

    evil Communist Socialist
    The only thing worse than an evil socialist is an evil communist socialist!

    What about evil communist capitalists?

    O you are right. Evil communist capitalists are even worse. But there are things even worse than that, such as evil communist socialist capitalists!!!!!


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