Trains may be delayed?



  • http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/service_disruptions/sad95435776b4d8a8fe0bf82c62bc768/details.html

    A system test in live code. Excellent. I wondered why I had a replacement bus this morning...



  • They're fixing the Hogwarts Express. It came out as "System Test" 'coz the System doesn't know about Platform 9 3/4.



  • @danixdefcon5 said:

    They're fixing the Hogwarts Express. It came out as "System Test" 'coz the System doesn't know about Platform 9 3/4.

    That would be some interesting paperwork.



  • UK's nationalrail is TRWTF... You just know there are going to be some service disruptions.

    It's too hot? They don't go. It's too cold? They don't go. Are there leaves on the tracks? You're stuck. ( http://www.southwesttrains.co.uk/SWTrains/Emotion/InsideStory/ISIssue7LeavesOnTheLine.htm ) If you're going anywhere during the weekend - just leave 3 hours early, because all the important engineering work can't be done during the week - that's what weekends are for. Also you're lucky if the signalisation works this week.

    I actually like the trains around here when they work properly (80% of the time) - but when they don't.....

    For fun: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2003/oct/22/transport.uk



  • @viraptor said:

    because all the important engineering work can't be done during the week - that's what weekends are for
     

    During the weekends a lot less people travel. Ergo engeneering that will likely cause delay is best done in weekends
    People usually have more time during weekends. Delays will be less irritating for them. Ergo engeneering that will likely cause delay is best done in weekends.

    The netherlands had a very good functioning railway system until 10 years ago. In the boomin end-90's economy and stock exchange the government decided to privatize public companies (which the railways were back then). To make more profit, the direction of the NS (the railway company) cut back on a lot of investment (e.g. maintanaince, new trains, railway expansion). So after a few years everything grinded to a halt with especially frequent long delays.

    It's getting a little better now luckily. I take the train 2x5 times a week and have a delay of 30+ min less than once a month. 5-10 minutes delays happen about twice a week, but I calculate those into my shedule and I understand those can happen.



  • I understand that the weekend is the best time for those works... But on the same track, every week, both days? For as long as I live here?

    It's just a pita, that delays / cancels seem to be a norm now.



  • @dtech said:

    The netherlands had a very good functioning railway system until 10 years ago. In the boomin end-90's economy and stock exchange the government decided to privatize public companies (which the railways were back then). To make more profit, the direction of the NS (the railway company) cut back on a lot of investment (e.g. maintanaince, new trains, railway expansion). So after a few years everything grinded to a halt with especially frequent long delays.
     

    Sounds exactly like what happened in melbourne.  I've never understood privatising industries that were never profitable and quite frankly were never meant to be profitable.  Now we pay more for a worse service and with all the goverment subsidies/hand outs to keep the private company going it costs about the same amount of tax dollars anyway.



  • @element[0] said:

    I've never understood privatising industries that were never profitable and quite frankly were never meant to be profitable.  Now we pay more for a worse service and with all the goverment subsidies/hand outs to keep the private company going it costs about the same amount of tax dollars anyway.

    It's usually to keep expenses "off the books".  That way politicians can claim they lowered spending and then simply funnel the money required to run the unprofitable enterprise through a backdoor, such as subsidies or tax breaks.  It's a pretty classic political move that appeals to those who want to lower spending on a superficial level, but eventually the government-subsidized debt accumulated by the enterprise becomes too massive and the government has to resume control of the company.  This happened recently in the US with the mortgage-lending government agencies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.


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