WTF? Ever heard of long words like superkalafradulisticixpialidocious?!!?!?



  • A message when posting to netflix.

     

    This review contains one or more words that is larger than 25 characters. All
    words in a review must be smaller than 25 characters.

    Please change any words that exceed this length.

     

     

    I mean if-i-cant-post-large-chained-words-like-so how can I ever write a user review? Like how can I claim that something was a giant-heap-o-horsecrap! without makign it all one giant word?



  • @astonerbum said:

    netflix.

    With the average intelligence of a netflix user, this sounds like a perfect policy.



    See also: Youtube commenters



  • @Farmer Brown said:

    @astonerbum said:
    netflix.

    With the average intelligence of a netflix user, this sounds like a perfect policy.



    See also: Youtube commenters
     

    Whats wrong with netflix? Its a nice way to legally get videos for all those crappy movies I would never consider buying. Sometimes user reviews help you figure out if the movie is worth your time (sometimes, rarely though).

     

    Youtube comments serve a different purpouse. I don't know what it is, but they apparently serve some purpose.



  • @astonerbum said:

    Youtube comments serve a different purpouse. I don't know what it is, but they apparently serve some purpose.

    Self-esteem boosts for retarded people.  No matter how stupid someone is, reading Youtube comments will make them feel smarter.  It's just like Stack Overflow -- you can be the biggest shit-for-brains on the planet but if you get to downvote other morons, you will feel better about yourself. 



  • @astonerbum said:

    Like how can I claim that something was a giant-heap-o-horsecrap! without makign it all one giant word?

    This was a "giant heap o astonerbum fail".

    Please note that there are very few words over 25 letters long. Even antidiscombobulation is only 21 letters long. Of course, if one wanted to be antidisestablishmentarianistic, that would be right out, unless ones vocabulary were sufficiently broad to contain phrases such as 'resembling preference for the union of church and state'.  (Yes, it's longer, at 55 letters versus 28. But it's many words, none of which are over 25 letters.)

    It's a silly rule, but the vast majority of word usage it blocks is similarly silly.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @astonerbum said:

    Youtube comments serve a different purpouse. I don't know what it is, but they apparently serve some purpose.

    Self-esteem boosts for retarded people.  No matter how stupid someone is, reading Youtube comments will make them feel smarter.  It's just like Stack Overflow -- you can be the biggest shit-for-brains on the planet but if you get to downvote other morons, you will feel better about yourself. 

    Huh. I always thought it was a huge failed attempt at artificial intelligence.



  • @astonerbum said:

    This review contains one or more words that is larger than 25 characters. All
    words in a review must be smaller than 25 characters.

    Please change any words that exceed this length.

    Perhaps it's implemented like this?



  • @tgape said:

    Please note that there are very few words over 25 letters long.

    My (former) field of research used "electroencephalographs" (22), and then there are of course hyphenated words in English, such as "common-or-garden-variety" (24). But the biggest problem with this software is that it is language-dependent to the max. My own native language, Dutch, allows compounding, thus easily generating words that are longer than 25 characters. Quite a few languages permit that sort of thing (e.g., Finnish, German, and Turkish). Take e.g. "levensverzekeringsmaatschappijen" (life insurance companies), quite a frequent word of 32 characters. You want long words? What about "Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft" (Association for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services). Take a look here fore more long words.



  • @TGV said:

    My (former) field of research used "electroencephalographs" (22), and then there are of course hyphenated words in English, such as "common-or-garden-variety" (24). But the biggest problem with this software is that it is language-dependent to the max. My own native language, Dutch, allows compounding, thus easily generating words that are longer than 25 characters. Quite a few languages permit that sort of thing (e.g., Finnish, German, and Turkish). Take e.g. "levensverzekeringsmaatschappijen" (life insurance companies), quite a frequent word of 32 characters. You want long words? What about "Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft" (Association for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services). Take a look here fore more long words.

     

    Just try to immagine the spelling bee in whateverville (wherever that word is from):

    Head Master:  "Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft"

    Student: "Can I get that in a sentence?"

    Head Master:  "Your Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft is showing."

    Student:  "D O N ... oh fuck it, I lose"



  • @TGV said:

    Dutch, allows compounding
     

    Yes

    @TGV said:

    easily generating words that are longer than 25 characters

    That's a bit of a, um, stretch. Common usage of Dutch rarely stumbles upon such words, though it's possible.

     Finnish, however, has a single [70-158]-letter word for every conceivable situation and their accented characters.



  • @amischiefr said:

    Just try to immagine the spelling bee in whateverville (wherever that word is from):

    Head Master:  "Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft"

    Student: "Can I get that in a sentence?"

    Head Master:  "Your Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft is showing."

    Student:  "D O N ... oh fuck it, I lose"

     

    Hmmm, it's quite Monty Python.



  • @TGV said:

    Dutch, allows compounding

     

    Man, if I were allowed to do a fraction of the stuff that the Dutch are allowed to do I wouldn't be here right now.



  • What, no one? 

    Okay, I guess it's my turn to be "that guy"...

    It's "supercalifragilisticexpialidocious".  Yes, that's from memory.  Yes, I'm a nerd.  A Mary-Poppins-lyric-spell-checking (33) nerd.



  •  @cconroy said:

    It's "supercalifragilisticexpialidocious".  Yes, that's from memory.  Yes, I'm a nerd.  A Mary-Poppins-lyric-spell-checking (33) nerd.

    I wonder how the stoner bum ended up with that "k" and "ix". With Poppins' enunciation, you should have no difficulty distilling "ex".

    Also, I think the cal might be call. Callifragilistic. But I don't know for certain.



  •  Humm diilli lum dilly lie,  Humm diilli lum dilly lie

     

    Now I got that stuck in my head!  

     

    (another Mary Poppins nerd.)



  • @TGV said:

    @tgape said:

    Please note that there are very few words over 25 letters long.

    My (former) field of research used "electroencephalographs" (22), and then there are of course hyphenated words in English, such as "common-or-garden-variety" (24). But the biggest problem with this software is that it is language-dependent to the max. My own native language, Dutch, allows compounding, thus easily generating words that are longer than 25 characters. Quite a few languages permit that sort of thing (e.g., Finnish, German, and Turkish). Take e.g. "levensverzekeringsmaatschappijen" (life insurance companies), quite a frequent word of 32 characters. You want long words? What about "Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft" (Association for subordinate officials of the head office management of the Danube steamboat electrical services). Take a look here fore more long words.

    The first language that popped into my mind was German, because of its use of compound words. It's fun to run these compounded words on automatic translation services; they'll either barf on the word, or simply ignore it. In fact, try the previous mentioned word in Babelfish. ;)



  • @cconroy said:

    What, no one? 

    Okay, I guess it's my turn to be "that guy"...

    It's "supercalifragilisticexpialidocious".  Yes, that's from memory.  Yes, I'm a nerd.  A Mary-Poppins-lyric-spell-checking (33) nerd.

     I'll be that guy as well and point out that it's not a real word.

     I would like to know what word the OP was trying to use on a netflix forum that was over 25 characters.



  • @savar said:

    netflix forum

    'nuff said.



  • @TGV said:

    "Donaudampfschiffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft"

    Using the new German spelling rules you can squeeze in another character, making it "schifffahrt".

    Although the word is so artificially constructed I don't even understand what it's supposed to mean.



  • @topspin said:

    Using the new German spelling rules you can squeeze in another character, making it "schifffahrt".

    TRWTF is that you can, but don't have to.

    In Japanese they don't use spaces at all. Someone wouldn't be able to post anything containing more than 25 words (most of the time, it would be less) unless he inserted random ugly spaces. Beat that.



  • @savar said:

     I'll be that guy as well and point out that it's not a real word.

    [url]http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=supercalifragilisticexpialidocious[/url]

    Not that that site is always a paragon of accuracy but the word is more concretely defined than you might think.



  • @derula said:

    @topspin said:
    Using the new German spelling rules you can squeeze in another character, making it "schifffahrt".

    TRWTF is that you can, but don't have to.

    You have to, but nobody out of school gives a shit about it.



  • @topspin said:

    You have to, but nobody out of school gives a shit about it.

    Oh. Well. I'm doing it anyways. I even find myself thinking about how to rephrase sentences to use words containing three times the same letter in a row.



  • @astonerbum said:

    I mean if-i-cant-post-large-chained-words-like-so how can I ever write a user review?
     

     This is done in order to improve readability of reviews.  You should choose synonyms instead, as long words tend to leave the reader hyperdiscombobulatedish and should therefore be avoided.

     



  • @D0R said:

     This is done in order to improve readability of reviews.  You should choose synonyms instead, as long words tend to leave the reader hyperdiscombobulatedish and should therefore be avoided.
    Frankly, I think that reviews should be illegible, so that people actually have to view the thing being reviewed, and form their own opinion, rather than parroting things they've heard from other people. NetFlix should implement Shift-F7 as a shortcut to a thesaurus service.


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