Sure blame the thumb drives....



  • reciently the pentagon banned the use of usb drives citing a systematic computer virus infection being spread by usb drives not authorized to be used on DOD systems .

    but the only step to authorize a device is to go to your S-6 office and scan the usb drives for viruses

    but the antivirus automatically scans a usb device when its plugged in

    so the real wtf isnt infected usb drives

    its the antivirus solution the DOD uses

    you would think the department of defense would use some uber secret high speed software that was government use only

    or at least a decient commercial antivirus

    but no they use one of the worst ones on the market ( i wont mention names)

    and that one is the only authorized antivirus for DOD systems

    and the funny thing is i knew about the infection for the past year and i tried to tell them

    but their answer was "our antivirus isnt picking it up so it doesnt exsist now stop making up stories"

    but mine did when i scanned an unclassified drive using my home computer's antivirus (also wont mention it but its free for home use and has a blue icon )

    the real wtf here is the antivirus the DOD uses they give away for free to soldiers and encourage them to use it.

    ive spent the past year telling the soldiers in our unit not to use it and a majority have switched to alternate products and most of them found infections undetectable to their previous product

    I guess the real lesson here is just because software is popular doesnt make it quality

    and just because software is free doesnt mean it isnt any good

     

     

     



  • @raziel said:

    you would think the department of defense would use some uber secret high speed software that was government use only

    I take it you don't have a lot of experience working with Federal bureaucracy. 



  • oh i do have experience but i kinda figured they would take information security more seriously seeing as national security was at stake......

     



  • @raziel said:

    oh i do have experience but i kinda figured they would take information security more seriously seeing as national security was at stake......
    This is yet another sign that you're new to government contracting.  You need to lose that idealism.  Here is how the government will pick an anti-virus software vendor (or anything else for that matter):

    First, they need to put together a bid package.  This will contain all the specifications of the software they need. But where do they get these specifications?  Procurement people don't know anything about software, so they go to a standard specification.  And where do the standard specifications come from?  Whichever software vendor has done the best networking and gotten their specs into the hands of the right people.  Now, these specs are always biased in favor of the vendor in question, often to the point where the approved products list is a single item: the vendor's software.  Since they can't sole-source a product, the procurement department will have to allow alternate software to be approved, but this is hard because the vendor who wrote the spec will include poison pills in the requirements: that is, they will include at least one feature, no matter how useless, that no other product has.  In some cases, other software must be approved before the bid takes place, leaving other vendors no time to implement said feature.  Even if they can implement the feature and get approval in time to bid, the extra cost of doing so often forces them out of the running, and the spec writing vendor walks away with a smile and a new contract.  This is not uncommon; my company has "provided" specs many times.  Sometimes procurement people will actually ask us to stack the deck in our favor because they liked our performance and don't want to risk some fly-by-night operation getting it. 

    And, of course, this is assuming you even need an open bid.  Often procurement offices will have spending amounts under which they don't need to present an open bid or get competitive pricing.  We get perhaps 20 projects a year in the $2500 to $10000 range where certain officials with whom we have a good relationship will simply call us for a price, issue a PO, and we go to work.  It's not illegal -- hell, it's not even considered shady.  I went to an airport authority conference a few weeks back where they encouraged vendors to meet with their small purchases people and establish a good relationship to get the sort of work I'm describing.



  • @raziel said:

    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>but no they use one of the worst ones on the market ( i wont mention names)<o:p></o:p>and that one is the only authorized antivirus for DOD systems<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p> The DoD has contracts with at least 3 Antivirus companies that I know of. In fact, it's DoD regulation that Servers and Workstations cannot be protected by products from the same Antivirus Company. I believe it's suggested (But not required) that your e-mail is scanned by a product from a 3rd vendor, but it's possible that was a local or Service Branch related requirement.<o:p></o:p>@raziel said:
    <o:p></o:p>reciently the pentagon banned the use of usb drives citing a systematic computer virus infection being spread by usb drives not authorized to be used on DOD systems .<o:p></o:p>but the only step to authorize a device is to go to your S-6 office and scan the usb drives for viruses (snip)<o:p></o:p>but mine did when i scanned an unclassified drive using my home computer's antivirus (also wont mention it but its free for home use and has a blue icon )<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    No, this was banned by DoD CIO/G-6 Data at Rest Memo of Apr 2006, DoD Directive 5200, and DoD Instruction 8500. I'm not sure of your branch of service, but the Army also bans this with AR 25-2. <o:p></o:p>If your Thumb Drive is personally owned, you are in violation of DoD Policy when you connect it to government computers. If it's government owned, you're in violation when you connect it to your computer. If you're taking it off post, you're in violation if it's not encrypted. In any case, you are in violation if the thumb drive isn't marked with the Data At Rest label. From your write up, I assume it's not.<o:p></o:p>The problem is your S-6, Information Assurance Security Officer, and Information Assurance Department. Depending on where you are, this might all be the same person. Your Unit Commander also has responsibility here. They are just rubber stamping reports. If you are in garrison, they probably aren't running the required Vulnerability Assessment either- Those should have detected the unauthorized USB Drives and the virus.<o:p></o:p> <o:p></o:p>@raziel said:
    <o:p></o:p>the real wtf here is the antivirus the DOD uses they give away for free to soldiers and encourage them to use it.<o:p></o:p>ive spent the past year telling the soldiers in our unit not to use it and a majority have switched to alternate products and most of them found infections undetectable to their previous product<o:p></o:p>I guess the real lesson here is just because software is popular doesnt make it quality<o:p></o:p>and just because software is free doesnt mean it isnt any good<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p></o:p>
    Again, the Real WTF is that your S-6 is lazy, incompetant, and not doing his/her job. But you are correct- Being free and/or popular does not mean good.<o:p></o:p>

     



  • @raziel said:

    but no they use one of the worst ones on the market ( i wont mention names)
     

    Norton?

    McAfee?



  • @bstorer said:

    @raziel said:

    oh i do have experience but i kinda figured they would take information security more seriously seeing as national security was at stake......
    This is yet another sign that you're new to government contracting.  You need to lose that idealism.  Here is how the government will pick an anti-virus software vendor (or anything else for that matter):

    First, they need to put together a bid package.  This will contain all the specifications of the software they need. But where do they get these specifications?  Procurement people don't know anything about software, so they go to a standard specification.  And where do the standard specifications come from?  Whichever software vendor has done the best networking and gotten their specs into the hands of the right people.  Now, these specs are always biased in favor of the vendor in question, often to the point where the approved products list is a single item: the vendor's software.  Since they can't sole-source a product, the procurement department will have to allow alternate software to be approved, but this is hard because the vendor who wrote the spec will include poison pills in the requirements: that is, they will include at least one feature, no matter how useless, that no other product has.  In some cases, other software must be approved before the bid takes place, leaving other vendors no time to implement said feature.  Even if they can implement the feature and get approval in time to bid, the extra cost of doing so often forces them out of the running, and the spec writing vendor walks away with a smile and a new contract.  This is not uncommon; my company has "provided" specs many times.  Sometimes procurement people will actually ask us to stack the deck in our favor because they liked our performance and don't want to risk some fly-by-night operation getting it. 

    And, of course, this is assuming you even need an open bid.  Often procurement offices will have spending amounts under which they don't need to present an open bid or get competitive pricing.  We get perhaps 20 projects a year in the $2500 to $10000 range where certain officials with whom we have a good relationship will simply call us for a price, issue a PO, and we go to work.  It's not illegal -- hell, it's not even considered shady.  I went to an airport authority conference a few weeks back where they encouraged vendors to meet with their small purchases people and establish a good relationship to get the sort of work I'm describing.

     

    You forgot the part where Cheney steps in and gives the contract to a company that he receives money from, no matter how many bidders there are or what their bid is.  Please amend your statement.



  •  @cdosrun said:

    ...
    QFT



  • @dtech said:

    @raziel said:

    but no they use one of the worst ones on the market ( i wont mention names)
     

    Norton?

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!

     @dtech said:

    McAfee?

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA! to the power of AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!




  • I can not believe

    that they would do that

    or insist on such asinine policies

    but who am I to advise the government

    I guess the lesson here is to use less line breaks



  • @dubbreak said:

    I can not believe

    that they would do that

    or insist on such asinine policies

    but who am I to advise the government

    I guess the lesson here is to use less line breaks

     

    A

    g

    r

    e

    e

    d



  •  ive been in the service for 10 years, and yes they do stupid things but one thing ive noticed is they tend to do the smart thing when peoples lives are at stake (at least where im at) so this was a WTF for me anyways

    as for the antivirus no there are only 2 authorized not 3 and both were stated in previous posters guesses

    see thats the problem its not the IASO

    because i was the IASO

    i was in the S-6

    and barking regulations at me is just proving my point

    the point is i was right and the antiviruses were inadequate

    and the thick headed attitude of the DOD is preventing real security

    BTW DOIM (and post) policy allowed the use of usb drives both personal and military for unclassifed non sensitive data (to allow NCO's and officers to be able to do councilings NCOER's and other such work at home) as long as it was scanned by the S-6 this policy was promulgated down to the users on multiple occasions

    i did my job i scanned usb drives with their useless antivirus i even warned doim there was an infetcion going around so calling me the lazy one is just typical of those who know nothing of real network security and make their living writing useless policies for people who know more about IA than you

     



  • dtech:
    raziel:
    but no they use one of the worst ones on the market ( i wont mention names)
     

    Norton?

    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!

     

    dtech:

    McAfee?


    AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA! to the power
    of AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!

     

     bingo!



  • @dtech said:

    McAfee?

    Weeeee!!!!! This "antivirus" went down in flames in 1994 ... trying to remove "DIR II"!!!

    Yes, a 5+ year old virus took down this POS; so even back then I didn't trust McAffee. Hell, I even trusted the MS Antivirus (remember that one?) than McAffee.

    Funny thing, the good one back then was Norton. Ah, how times have changed...



  • @danixdefcon5 said:

    @dtech said:

    McAfee?

    Weeeee!!!!! This "antivirus" went down in flames in 1994 ... trying to remove "DIR II"!!!

    Yes, a 5+ year old virus took down this POS; so even back then I didn't trust McAffee. Hell, I even trusted the MS Antivirus (remember that one?) than McAffee.

    Funny thing, the good one back then was Norton. Ah, how times have changed...

     

    So what's the best free one now?



  • @raziel said:

    and that one is the only authorized antivirus for DOD systems 

    @raziel said:

    as for the antivirus no there are only 2 authorized not 3 and both were stated in previous posters guesses


    Yes, I see now. Are you sure you don't want to search for Trend Micro on AKO?

    @raziel said:

    see thats the problem its not the IASO

    because i was the IASO

    i was in the S-6

    and barking regulations at me is just proving my point

    the point is i was right and the antiviruses were inadequate

    and the thick headed attitude of the DOD is preventing real security

    Yes. I see. The thick headed attitude of the DoD assuming you were doing your job according to regulation. You, sir, are the WTF. You might not be the only one, but you are one.

    @raziel said:

    BTW DOIM (and post) policy allowed the use of usb drives both personal and military for unclassifed non sensitive data (to allow NCO's and officers to be able to do councilings NCOER's and other such work at home) as long as it was scanned by the S-6 this policy was promulgated down to the users on multiple occasions

    Failing to follow the policy, then blaming the policy when it fails you? Nice. That "NCOERS and other such work" is precisely what this policy was designed to prevent. It often contains PII, which is NOT "Unclassified Non Senstive", it is SBU, Sensitive But Unclassified.The Army paid a lot of money for various data protection programs and strategies, it's nice to see my work and tax dollars wasted because you feel orders don't apply to you.

     

    @raziel said:

    i did my job i scanned usb drives with their useless antivirus i even warned doim there was an infetcion going around so calling me the lazy one is just typical of those who know nothing of real network security and make their living writing useless policies for people who know more about IA than you

    Yes, the guy who can't even answer how many Antivirus Scanners he has with the same number two days in a row knows more about IA then I do. The guy who claims he knows policy and willfully disobeys orders, putting soldiers PII at risk, isn't ignorant. The SOB who can't be bothered to file a US-CERT report or contact the IAVM Team isn't lazy.

    And the cry goes up.... "But DOIM told me it was OK!". Right. Fine. You aren't the only WTF. Do me a favor- Where are you stationed?



  • @cdosrun said:

    Do me a favor- Where are you stationed?

    pssst Dude, don't tell him where you are stationed!  I think it might be a trap!



  • @amischiefr said:

    You forgot the part where Cheney steps in and gives the contract to a company that he receives money from, no matter how many bidders there are or what their bid is.  Please amend your statement.

    Trying to act like this is something only Cheney did or does is silly.  I don't know if you are joking, but almost every politican acts this way.  Hell, most of the contracts awarded to Halliburton for Iraq were established under the Clinton Administration, anyway. 



  • @cdosrun said:

    @raziel said:

    and that one is the only authorized antivirus for DOD systems 

    @raziel said:

    as for the antivirus no there are only 2 authorized not 3 and both were stated in previous posters guesses


    Yes, I see now. Are you sure you don't want to search for Trend Micro on AKO?

    @raziel said:

    see thats the problem its not the IASO

    because i was the IASO

    i was in the S-6

    and barking regulations at me is just proving my point

    the point is i was right and the antiviruses were inadequate

    and the thick headed attitude of the DOD is preventing real security

    Yes. I see. The thick headed attitude of the DoD assuming you were doing your job according to regulation. You, sir, are the WTF. You might not be the only one, but you are one.

    @raziel said:

    BTW DOIM (and post) policy allowed the use of usb drives both personal and military for unclassifed non sensitive data (to allow NCO's and officers to be able to do councilings NCOER's and other such work at home) as long as it was scanned by the S-6 this policy was promulgated down to the users on multiple occasions

    Failing to follow the policy, then blaming the policy when it fails you? Nice. That "NCOERS and other such work" is precisely what this policy was designed to prevent. It often contains PII, which is NOT "Unclassified Non Senstive", it is SBU, Sensitive But Unclassified.The Army paid a lot of money for various data protection programs and strategies, it's nice to see my work and tax dollars wasted because you feel orders don't apply to you.

     

    @raziel said:

    i did my job i scanned usb drives with their useless antivirus i even warned doim there was an infetcion going around so calling me the lazy one is just typical of those who know nothing of real network security and make their living writing useless policies for people who know more about IA than you

    Yes, the guy who can't even answer how many Antivirus Scanners he has with the same number two days in a row knows more about IA then I do. The guy who claims he knows policy and willfully disobeys orders, putting soldiers PII at risk, isn't ignorant. The SOB who can't be bothered to file a US-CERT report or contact the IAVM Team isn't lazy.

    And the cry goes up.... "But DOIM told me it was OK!". Right. Fine. You aren't the only WTF. Do me a favor- Where are you stationed?

     

    lol you obviously have no idea what you are talking about trend micro is not on the ako downloads page i just checked it to verify

    symantec mcafee and norton are

    so gtfo my internet

    and the approved antivirus for dod networks is symantec and mcafee

    i just double checked the approved list to verify

    now if you knew anything about army IA you would know they delegated all authority to DOIM so you either do it there way or get cut off from the network and have your user account revoked

    it isnt a matter of oh doim says its ok so we can its a matter of doim says we do this or else

    doim is the law when it comes to IA in the army

     

    so STFU and GTFO my internet

     



  • I think the real scary part is that I am getting the impression the OP works for the government and writes like a child.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Trying to act like this is something only Cheney did or does is silly.

    Does this make it any less reprehensible?



  • @raziel said:

    symantec mcafee and norton are

    Really? Symantec, Mcafee, AND Norton? Or is that Symantec Mcafee and Norton?

    Post where you're stationed. I'd love to see your AVTR records audited.



  • @Farmer Brown said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    Trying to act like this is something only Cheney did or does is silly. 

    Does this make it any less reprehensible?

    Yes.  Absoluty.  That is precisely what I said.  To the letter.  Verbatim.  Without a single shred of doubt.  At all.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Absoluty.

    I see. You sure do get defensive if someone asks you a question.



  • @cdosrun said:

    @raziel said:

    symantec mcafee and norton are

    Really? Symantec, Mcafee, AND Norton? Or is that Symantec Mcafee and Norton?

    Post where you're stationed. I'd love to see your AVTR records audited.

    I think that "Norton Corporate AV" is now called "Symantec Corporate AV", so "Symantec" and "Norton" might actually be different AV's. Nostalgia, maybe? Symantec was the first AV vendor for the Mac (called SAM), in the old System Software 5 days. The "Corporate" versions are actually decent, unlike its "home" Norton AV counterpart.

    @cdosrun said:
    So what's the best free one now?
    Free? Used to be AVG, but it seems it went down the bloatware path as well. Could be the Panda AV free edition (I used the corporate version, it was actually decent) or NOD32.

    For paid AV's, I'd go for the Panda Corporate AV. It's very useful if you have a Windows Domain; you can do installs and updates from the Administration Console, saving time and having the added benefit of being transparent to the users.



  • @Farmer Brown said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    Absoluty.

    I see. You sure do get defensive sarcastic if someone a retarded n00b asks you a question projectile vomits stupidity at you.

    FTFY, darling. 



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    FTFY, darling.

    Thank you. I could not have demonstrated my point any better.



  •  Could you two please stop? That's neither funny nor enlightening.



  • @Ilya Ehrenburg said:

    That's neither funny nor enlightening.

    Agreed.



  • @danixdefcon5 said:

    @cdosrun said:
    So what's the best free one now?
    Free? Used to be AVG, but it seems it went down the bloatware path as well. Could be the Panda AV free edition (I used the corporate version, it was actually decent) or NOD32.
    There's no free NOD32, except maybe from PirateBay. Unless they’ve hidden it really well on their site.

    I dumped AVG when it was messing up EQ; the free version didn't allow exceptions, and turning off on-acces protection didn't actually prevent scanning. Since then, I've been using the Avast! Home Edition. All they ask is that you register (for free) once a year.



  • @Ilya Ehrenburg said:

     Could you two please stop? That's neither funny nor enlightening.

     

    Really?  It was the only post that I laughed out loud at tonight. Anyway, I'd rather read morb and farmer make jabs at one another than two army guys barking regulation order numbers and arguing over which anti-virus software the army uses.



  • @tster said:

    Anyway, I'd rather read morb and farmer
    make jabs at one another than two army guys barking regulation order
    numbers and arguing over which anti-virus software the army uses.

    Definitely. And as it went on, it started to amuse me, too.



  • @raziel said:

    because i was the IASO

    i was in the S-6

     

    I call BS. Nobody with the bad English, grammar, and inability to use the shift key to properly capitalize words and form sentences was any kind of O, much less S-6.

    If you have 10 years in the military, it's either as a grunt doing mostly KP or it's not the US military and all your nonsense about the DOD is just that - nonsense.

    I realize that Bush and Cheney have lowered the standards for enlisting in the military, but I don't believe they've gotten as low as the illiterate for the Zero level yet. 



  • @Farmer Brown said:

    I think the real scary part is that I am getting the impression the OP works for the government and writes like a child.
     

    I agree. When my son was four he had better grammar and sentence structure; by 5 he could properly use capital letters, too. 



  • @KenW said:

    I call BS. Nobody with the bad English, grammar, and inability to use the shift key to properly capitalize words and form sentences was any kind of O, much less S-6.

    My point exactly. Thank you very much, good sir.



  • @KenW said:

    @raziel said:

    because i was the IASO

    i was in the S-6

     

    I call BS. Nobody with the bad English, grammar, and inability to use the shift key to properly capitalize words and form sentences was any kind of O, much less S-6.

    If you have 10 years in the military, it's either as a grunt doing mostly KP or it's not the US military and all your nonsense about the DOD is just that - nonsense.

    I realize that Bush and Cheney have lowered the standards for enlisting in the military, but I don't believe they've gotten as low as the illiterate for the Zero level yet. 

     

    good thing your opinion is just as useless as your attitude

    as for my grammar and english your argument is the last desperate logical fallacy of a lost argument. you can not dispute my point so you find something else to attack. Am i perfect? By no means do i ever claim that. but since you are unable to refute my origional point i must place your words with equal weight as the bleeting of sheep.

    you can "call BS" all you want to i franky dont care what you think as you have proven your viewpoint worthless as well as the ignorant fools echoing your opinions and views.

    open your mind once and a while and you will be suprised what you can learn.

    ive learned more about practical network security from blackhats who's spelling and english are far worse than mine while eletist whitehat grammarfags are getting owned by them all the while ignoring anyones opinion who doesnt conform to their view of perfect english.  focus less on apperance and more on function and you can learn a thing or two.

    when you judge a man on how good his typist skills are you do yourself a grave disservice skills arent neccicarraly corrilated to each other. i would not dream of judging a programmer on how well he played baseball or judging a web admin on his ability to drive a stick shift 

    and by the way not one of you has been able to dispute my origional point

    thats the killer to your eletist arguments

    im right

     



  • @raziel said:

    and by the way not one of you has been able to dispute my origional point

    thats the killer to your eletist arguments

    ROFLMAO this guy is great!



  • @cdosrun said:

    Trend Micro
     

    Don't use Trend Micro! I use a different email alias for each website/product I register at. The "Trend Micro" alias got hammered with spam before I black-listed it at SMTP. I remember it fondly as that was one of the first for me to black-list. :)

     



  • @raziel said:

    skills arent neccicarraly corrilated to each other.

    This is beautiful.



  • @vr602 said:

    @raziel said:

    skills arent neccicarraly corrilated to each other.

    This is beautiful.

     

    Aye, but I'm afraid [b]this[/b] may have been done on purpose.



  • @KenW said:

    @raziel said:

    because i was the IASO

    i was in the S-6

    I call BS. Nobody with the bad English, grammar, and inability to use the shift key to properly capitalize words and form sentences was any kind of O, much less S-6.

    Actually, I disagree.  raziel appears to me to have some of the most comprehensible1 bad grammar and spelling of the enlisted men I've encountered.  That having been said, the problems demonstrated are consistent with what I've seen from people in our armed forces.

    Note that I fully admit there are punctuation perfect paragons in the armed services.  However, there seems to generally be a very large gap between them and the rest of the rank and file.  Also note that raziel's comment about the various skills compared do not necessarily correlate is accurate, even though it's spelled horribly.

    1 This is especially impressive, as I agree that raziel's grammar and spelling are rather poor - even worse than, say, KenW's.



  • @Ilya Ehrenburg said:

    @vr602 said:

    @raziel said:

    skills arent neccicarraly corrilated to each other.

    This is beautiful.

     

    Aye, but I'm afraid this may have been done on purpose.

    Yes but you are falling into that old Literary Criticism trap of worrying about the author's intentions! I concern myself only with the beauty, style, poetry and classic timelessness of his words. His intent is not part of his Art, his motives mean nothing to me. Beauty is all. 


  •  Apparently Norton AV 2009 is a complete turn around for Norton AV products and is usable.

     

    Anyone able to confirm?



  • Wow... so much flame... so shiny...

    I'm not only horrible at english: i'm also not american. So i have a few points to add to this... err... cultural deathmatch.

     

    1) the term "my internet" is clearly childish and bad written. Every adult in the world with at least 2 posts of experience knows it's called "internets", and must be preceeded by a "teh". "GTFO my internet" indicates subnormality.

    2) you people are talking about a lot of beautiful antivirus(es?), with an even more beautiful history, and the posibility of them being installed in the trascendent offices of the Day of Defeat agency. I have a question about this, regarding the WTF degree in this flamewar: we're talking about an important and full of nasty secrets military agency... with windows systems?

    3) Here, on Argentina, we have some dark history with our own military force, so we basically hate every military people in the world to avoid feeling guilty. So, if you take that perspective, and add the fact that goverment bureaucracy (or agencies?) are hated all around the world, plus years of internet experience and some misanthopy, you can easily afirm that this obvious retarded troll is probably a high rank official indeed, and that he's also telling the truth about his superiors being more stupid than him.

    4) FU americans sigles, go learn to expand yourself. Teh internets demands clarifications. S-6, DOD, CIO/G-6, AR 25-2, QFT, IASO, DOIM, SOB, POS, AKO, US-CERT, IAVM, PII, AVTR, O, EQ... USB! do you call that a language? It take ages TFOWTFDTM.


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