Multiple WTF



  • I think the following text from the "What is your question" box of the contact us page of my 401k company's website sums this up nicely.

    I have two actually
    1 I recently received an email supposedly from you asking me to take on online satisfaction survey. It came from the follwing email address Investment Company Name cracklecrackleonlinecracklesurveyscom  The subject line was blank and it asked me to go to the following link: httpcrackleonlinecracklesurveyscomsurveyloginaspk5845745445  This smells like a phishing attack or at least junk spam to me so I wanted to verify from you that it was real or alert you of it if it is not

    2 Recently I was transferred to a different department within the company and moved  I was trying to update my profile information however I was unable to as the extension field for my work phone number is only allowed to be 5 numbers and my extensions is actually 6 numbers long


    actually, after trying to submit this I know have a third question.  When I tried to submit it it came back with Validation Error
    You must correct the following errors before proceeding
     Your Question contains invalid characters please reenter

    But it doesnt actually tell me which characters are invalid  Since I dont feel like guessing and resubmitting over and over again I am removing all characters other than numbers and letters  I apologize if that makes it hard to read

     

    I thought about spelling out all the characters, but didn't have quite that much time to waste



  •  Crackle ?



  • It's probably the obfuscation he had to do for the so-called special characters.

    Actually, I think he also needs to spell-check that complaint a bit because some of it's hard to parse.  You'll get better response (on the rare occasion you actually *get* a response) to a complaint if it's written clearly.



  • @jetcitywoman said:

    It's probably the obfuscation he had to do for the so-called special characters.

    Actually, I think he also needs to spell-check that complaint a bit because some of it's hard to parse.  You'll get better response (on the rare occasion you actually *get* a response) to a complaint if it's written clearly.

    Yeah, if you are going to do sound effects at least put them in something like *pop* so we know what it is.

    It gets real anoy%*@(*&#...<NO CARRIER>



  • Actually, I think he also needs to spell-check that complaint a bit because some of it's hard to parse.  You'll get better response (on the rare occasion you actually *get* a response) to a complaint if it's written clearly.

     

    woosh



  • @campkev said:

    I have two actually
    1 I recently received an email supposedly from you asking me to take on online satisfaction survey. It came from the follwing email address Investment Company Name cracklecrackleonlinecracklesurveyscom  The subject line was blank and it asked me to go to the following link: httpcrackleonlinecracklesurveyscomsurveyloginaspk5845745445  This smells like a phishing attack or at least junk spam to me so I wanted to verify from you that it was real or alert you of it if it is not

    Okay, the "crackle" is kind of a WTF, I'll give you that much.  But him asking if it was real isn't a WTF; that's what most companies ask their users to do if they're unsure.

    2 Recently I was transferred to a different department within the company and moved  I was trying to update my profile information however I was unable to as the extension field for my work phone number is only allowed to be 5 numbers and my extensions is actually 6 numbers long

    This certainly is a WTF.  For your company.  Why are you limiting the extension length?


    actually, after trying to submit this I know have a third question.  When I tried to submit it it came back with Validation Error
    You must correct the following errors before proceeding
     Your Question contains invalid characters please reenter

    But it doesnt actually tell me which characters are invalid  Since I dont feel like guessing and resubmitting over and over again I am removing all characters other than numbers and letters  I apologize if that makes it hard to read

    This is another WTF.  For your company.  If it doesn't list what characters are valid and what characters are invalad, that's a pretty useless error message.

    I thought about spelling out all the characters, but didn't have quite that much time to waste

    Yes, another WTF.  For you.  You consider helping people who report usability issues "wasting your time".



  •  @ebs2002 said:

    Yes, another WTF.  For you. 
    You consider helping people who report usability issues "wasting your
    time".


    Do I have to retake reading comprehension 101 or is it your turn? I had
    the impression campkev posed these questions to his 401(k) company (for
    us non-americans: wikipedia is good for these obscure numbers), being a
    little mean to them because of their crappy UI, not that he worked at
    the company being unhelpful to a customer.



  • @campkev said:

    You must correct the following errors before proceeding

    Your Question contains invalid characters please reenter

     

    TRWTF is that there are even invalid characters to consider.

    Unless the company is using a plain-text file for a "database", or not using SQL escaping, there's no way the question would contain invalid characters.  (I'm assuming it's being stored as plaintext.  Then again, it may not considering the WTF.)



  • @MiffTheFox said:

    @campkev said:

    You must correct the following errors before proceeding

    Your Question contains invalid characters please reenter

     

    TRWTF is that there are even invalid characters to consider.

    Unless the company is using a plain-text file for a "database", or not using SQL escaping, there's no way the question would contain invalid characters.  (I'm assuming it's being stored as plaintext.  Then again, it may not considering the WTF.)

    It's quite possible to have invalid characters even if you're using SQL escaping. For example, U+FFFE is not a valid Unicode character, and many programs have problems with U+0000 characters within a text string.



  • @KattMan said:

    Yeah, if you are going to do sound effects at least put them in something like pop so we know what it is.
    Snap Crackle Pop!@KattMan said:
    It gets real anoy%@(&#...<NO CARRIER>
    TRWFT is that this is detected as an email address.

     



  • @Carnildo said:

    @MiffTheFox said:

    TRWTF is that there are even invalid characters to consider.

    Unless the company is using a plain-text file for a "database", or not using SQL escaping, there's no way the question would contain invalid characters.  (I'm assuming it's being stored as plaintext.  Then again, it may not considering the WTF.)

    It's quite possible to have invalid characters even if you're using SQL escaping. For example, U+FFFE is not a valid Unicode character, and many programs have problems with U+0000 characters within a text string.

     

    I'm assuming that he's using a web browser to submit this, and not a custom method.  IIRC, all the major browsers (Firefox, IE, Opera, Safari, Chrome) don't let you put invalid characters in a text are.  If it was an invalid character such as U+FFFE or U+0000, deleting the punctuation got rid of it?

    In addition, the server may be expecting a 8-bit encoding (such as ISO-8859-1) or it could be expecting us-ascii and chocking on characters higher then U+007F.

     

    Basically, my point is that if it's a character in the range of U+0020 to U+007F that's causing the form to choke, that would constitute a WTF.

    I beleive this is from some SQL injection "protection" that essentially boils down to Input.Contains(''').

     



  •  the real WTF is that there is still a colon in the submitted text.



  • @Ilya Ehrenburg said:

    I had
    the impression campkev posed these questions to his 401(k) company (for
    us non-americans: wikipedia is good for these obscure numbers)
     

    Proof of how accustomed we get to beauracy.  I'm an American who considers myself pretty good at not making cultural/global assumptions, but it had simply never occured to me that not everyone in the world would know what a 401(k) was.  This particluar provision of our WTF tax code is about as common and mundane a financial concept as a checking account.

    <hints id="hah_hints"></hints>



  • @prophet6 said:

    I'm an American who considers myself pretty good at not making cultural/global assumptions, but it had simply never occured to me that not everyone in the world would know what a 401(k) was.  This particluar provision of our WTF tax code is about as common and mundane a financial concept as a checking account.
     

    I am Dutch, and also allergic to paperwork. I've heard vaguely of a thing called 401(k), but cannot explain to you what it is.



  • @dhromed said:

    @prophet6 said:

    I'm an American who considers myself pretty
    good at not making cultural/global assumptions, but it had simply never
    occured to me that not everyone in the world would know what a 401(k)
    was.  This particluar provision of our WTF tax code is about as
    common and mundane a financial concept as a checking account.
     

    I am Dutch, and also allergic to paperwork. I've heard vaguely of a thing called 401(k), but cannot explain to you what it is.


    It's some kind of pension scheme they have in America.  When your
    provider goes bust and your whole pension suddenly disappears, it turns
    into a 404(k). 



  • Do I have to retake reading comprehension 101 or is it your turn? I had the impression campkev posed these questions to his 401(k) company

     Oh, in that case, good find!  The wording was ambiguous, he said "my 401(k) company's website", and I interpreted that to mean the company that he worked for, and not his company's provider's website.

    And for anyone who's wondering, a 401(k) is basically a plan that encourages americans to save to their retirement fund.  Any money put into it is untaxed, but you can't touch it until it's matured (else you need to pay the government taxes on it)



  • @DaveK said:

    It's some kind of pension scheme they have in America.  When your
    provider goes bust and your whole pension suddenly disappears, it turns
    into a 404(k)

    It's a retirement account set up by an employer for an employee.  It is employer-directed (meaning the employee usually can't invest in anything they want and employer contributions often take the form of stock in the company) and it allows an employee and employer to contribute money up to a certain amount.  The money put in is not taxed as income, nor any money that is earned inside the account.  Instead, money withdrawn from the account is taxed as income.  This (in theory) permits you to earn more money because you can put more in by not paying taxes.  It also (in theory) allows the government to gain more in taxes because you will withdraw a greater amount of income than you put in.  This is all contingent on you not withdrawing any money from the account before you are 59.5 years old.

     

    There are also IRAs (Independent Retirement Accounts) that are set up by an employee and function mostly the same, except that the employer does not contribute anything and the employee decides how the money is invested.  There are also "Roth" variants of both IRAs and 401(k)s that tax the money you put in, but not the money you withdraw.  These are all part of the IRS's byzantine tax code.  It's arguable whether the tax breaks are worth the restrictions; a decent investor would almost certainly do better avoiding the accounts and just investing their savings as usual, mostly because there is a lot more flexibility compared to a retirement account.



  • @MorbiusWilters said:

    There are also IRAs (Independent Retirement Accounts) that are set up by an employee and function mostly the same, except that the employer does not contribute anything and the employee decides how the money is invested.  There are also "Roth" variants of both IRAs and 401(k)s that tax the money you put in, but not the money you withdraw.  These are all part of the IRS's byzantine tax code.  It's arguable whether the tax breaks are worth the restrictions; a decent investor would almost certainly do better avoiding the accounts and just investing their savings as usual, mostly because there is a lot more flexibility compared to a retirement account.

     

    In my vast experience (a whopping three companies) with 401(k)'s, I've never had a situation where the matching came in the form of company stock.  Granted, two of the three companies weren't public companies, so that wasn't an option.  At the third(my current company), it is an option if you choose, to buy company stock through the 401(K), but it was not automatic or even "encouraged".  They also have a separate employee stock purchase plan outside the 401(k) where you can buy stock at 15% off the current market price.  Again this is avaible but in no way are they do they try to coerce you into it.  Two of the 3 companies did matching. One at 50% of 6% and the current at 100% of 5%.

    For the uninitiated, X% of Y% means that if I put part of my paycheck (up to Y%) into my 401K the company will put an additional X% of that amount into my 401K as well.  I can put more, but they don't match on that amount.

     For example with the first one 50% of 6%.  Say I make $1000 a week and put 6% in, that would be $60 and the company would put in and additional 30%.  Some companies have what is called a vesting period, where if you quit, you lose some or all of the matched funds.  The first place I worked had a 25% per year vesting plan.  So if I quit after only 6 months, I would keep all the money I put in, but wouldn't get any of the matching funds.  If I quit after 2 years, I would get half of the matching funds.

     My current employer does 100% of 5% with no vesting period.  So over the last year, I've made a 33% gain on the money I put in, despite the market being down considerably over that period.  I don't care how good you are (or think you are) you aren't going to beat that eschewing the plan and going at it alone.



  • @campkev said:

    In my vast experience (a whopping three companies) with 401(k)'s, I've never had a situation where the matching came in the form of company stock.  Granted, two of the three companies weren't public companies, so that wasn't an option.  At the third(my current company), it is an option if you choose, to buy company stock through the 401(K), but it was not automatic or even "encouraged".  They also have a separate employee stock purchase plan outside the 401(k) where you can buy stock at 15% off the current market price.  Again this is avaible but in no way are they do they try to coerce you into it.

    I never said anybody tried to coerce employees into taking stock, but it's not uncommon for public corporations to pay at least part of the matching in stock.  It's cheaper overall for the company and it kinda-sorta might make employees care more about the success of the company, maybe. 



  • @campkev said:

    For the uninitiated, X% of Y% means that if I put part of my paycheck (up to Y%) into my 401K the company will put an additional X% of that amount into my 401K as well.  I can put more, but they don't match on that amount.

     For example with the first one 50% of 6%.  Say I make $1000 a week and put 6% in, that would be $60 and the company would put in and additional 30%. 

    ITYM 30 bucks, not 30 percent, no?

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