Only An Int32 ?



  • This was from John Waters ...
     
    We got this on our support forum from a customer, I will omit the details of the customers name and the product, but here is the meat of the question ...

    Layer Limit Int32 ?
    Hi,
    It seems the TpsSheet.Layer property is an Int32.  My app may end up having more than 32 layers since I'm programming it so that the end-users can maintain layers.  So...
    1) Is there a possibility of changing this property to an Int64?
    2) My organization is in the process of purchasing the Premium license which I understand includes the source code for the product.  If I have the source, can I change this to Int64?



  • @Alex Papadimoulis said:


    2) My organization is in the process of purchasing the Premium license which I understand includes the source code for the product.  If I have the source, can I change this to Int64?


    "Yes.  All you have to do is open a DOS prompt, and type 'format c: /FS:fat /x'"



  • Well theres no need for this to be a WTF.  Perhaps the TpsSheet.Layer is a bitfield, indicating which layers the TpsSheet has/is associated with.



  • @Alex Papadimoulis said:

    This was from John Waters ...
     
    We got this on our support forum from a customer, I will omit the details of the customers name and the product, but here is the meat of the question ...

    Layer Limit Int32 ?
    Hi,
    It seems the TpsSheet.Layer property is an Int32.  My app may end up having more than 32 layers since I'm programming it so that the end-users can maintain layers.  So...
    1) Is there a possibility of changing this property to an Int64?
    2) My organization is in the process of purchasing the Premium license which I understand includes the source code for the product.  If I have the source, can I change this to Int64?



    I think John Water's company might want to think twice about buying the premium license and letting him monkey around with the source code. Sounds like it would be much cheaper to get the regular license and pay for any enhancements they may need.

    So, how did the person on the support forum explain to this guy why he can already have more than 32 layers without making him feel like a complete idiot?


  • @ferrengi said:

    So, how did the person on the support forum
    explain to this guy why he can already have more than 32 layers without
    making him feel like a complete idiot?




    Simple: "You're in luck! With the Premium license, it allows many more
    than 32 layers, even though the property is still listed as an Int32."



    Every word is true, you avoided insulting the customer, and you convinced him that he needs to shell out for the upgrade.



    ...



    Gahh, I've been in too many meetings with Marketing people.






  • @ferrengi said:


    So, how did the person on the support forum explain to this guy why he can already have more than 32 layers without making him feel like a complete idiot?

    Why would you want to avoid making him feel like a complete idiot?



  • Because it's a support forum.

    Personally, I'd reply with utter dryness and no judgement at all:

    [[
    Dear sir,

    Int32 means there are 32 bits to the integer, which allow it to contain any quantity from 0 to 4,294,967,296.

    I hope that leaves you with enough room for layers.

    Luv,
    Support
    ]]

    If he blows up the app anyway (which is likely, considering), he'll come crawling back to have it fixed at $150/h.

    \o/



  • @dhromed said:

    Because it's a support forum.
    Int32 means there are 32 bits to the integer, which allow it to contain any quantity from 0 to 4,294,967,296.


    Actually, Int32 is signed, so it can contain any quantity from -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647.



  • @SpoonMeiser said:

    @ferrengi said:

    So, how did the person on the support forum explain to this guy why he can already have more than 32 layers without making him feel like a complete idiot?

    Why would you want to avoid making him feel like a complete idiot?

    Answer:
    @Alex Papadimoulis said:

    2) My organization is in the process of purchasing the Premium license ...




  • But you have to admit, 32 layers is often not enough. From a practical standpoint, it's not as bad as 128-bit encryption. I mean, how long would it take a practiced hacker with nimble fingers to go through all 128 possible keys?

    --Rank



  • @Rank Amateur said:

    But you have to admit, 32 layers is often not enough. From a practical standpoint, it's not as bad as 128-bit encryption. I mean, how long would it take a practiced hacker with nimble fingers to go through all 128 possible keys?


    Now THAT'S a good point.  And to think, I only have ONE key for my house.  It's a wonder it hasn't been stolen.



  • @marvin_rabbit said:

    @Rank Amateur said:
    But you have to admit, 32 layers is often not enough. From a practical standpoint, it's not as bad as 128-bit encryption. I mean, how long would it take a practiced hacker with nimble fingers to go through all 128 possible keys?
    Now THAT'S a good point.  And to think, I only have ONE key for my house.  It's a wonder it hasn't been stolen.
    And I only have five tumblers in my lock.  How hard could it be for a burglar to bring along five different keys to unlock the front door?

    Too bad we aren't talking about how many ways there are to glue two locks (hubs) together, the counting would go on for days :)



  • @Coughptcha said:

    @marvin_rabbit said:
    @Rank Amateur said:
    But you have to admit, 32 layers is often not enough. From a practical standpoint, it's not as bad as 128-bit encryption. I mean, how long would it take a practiced hacker with nimble fingers to go through all 128 possible keys?
    Now THAT'S a good point.  And to think, I only have ONE key for my house.  It's a wonder it hasn't been stolen.
    And I only have five tumblers in my lock.  How hard could it be for a burglar to bring along five different keys to unlock the front door?

    Too bad we aren't talking about how many ways there are to glue two locks (hubs) together, the counting would go on for days :)


    Why, with two locks, you double the amount of possible keys, of course.


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