Good Job Duke Energy



  • I was hit by the remnants of Ike as it went through Cincinnati.  My power's still out right now, but it's
    on at the office.

    I figured I wouldn't bother the Duke Energy phone line as the operators are probably getting many irate calls and wouldn't be able to give me any answers, so I turned to the website.  They have a <font color="#0000ff">nice little table</font> showing what counties currently have the most outages and how many.  There's also a link to <font color="#0000ff">THIS</font> map.

    DON'T CLICK THE MAP LINK unless you want to wait for many minutes while your browser figures out where to put 8400 images (at last count) with CSS (style='position:absolute;left:290;top:476').  I actually can't load it right now as I lost patience with FF waiting for it to render, and I'm referring to the source of a copy that I saved earlier.

    I've never seen anything like this before, and certainly never coded anything like it.  Is it a WTF or should I get a real browser?



  • whole thing loaded for me in about 10-15 seconds.  Windows XP with IE7



  • Oh no, this is definitely a WTF. This is astounding. Just the HTML code is nearly 900KB.They must be querying their outage database and just dumping each area's total as a position for "DotRX.gif".

    The  proper solution is, of course, to do this locally, open it in Firefox, allow it 15 minutes to render, print it out, and a take a photo of the printout on a wooden table...



  •  "Current outage information is not available at this time. As of 1 p.m, EDT 09/16/08, just under 500,000 customers are still without power in Ohio and Kentucky."

    Own up - who posted the link to Slashdot?



  • @belgariontheking said:

    I actually can't load it
    right now as I lost patience with FF waiting for it to render, and I'm
    referring to the source of a copy that I saved earlier.
    I don't know what you're talking about.  It loaded in seconds for me...




  • @bstorer said:

    @belgariontheking said:

    I actually can't load it
    right now as I lost patience with FF waiting for it to render, and I'm
    referring to the source of a copy that I saved earlier.
    I don't know what you're talking about.  It loaded in seconds for me...


    You didnt click link to the "world map"



  • Loads and renders here in about 5 seconds (IE8, Opera 9.6), though it's clearly designed for IE as each image uses alt="xyz" for the tooltip. At least they save a couple bytes on each image as they haven't used the title attribute!



  • Wouldn't load in firefox, but loads up quite quickly in Chrome.



  •  Is this outage due to hurricane, ot is it normal daily outage in US?

     btw, firefox indeed freeze on map, but uses 0% CPU, so i guess it's more a deadlock somewhere that need to be adressed !



  • @tchize said:

     Is this outage due to hurricane, ot is it normal daily outage in US?

    Well, I guess there is nothing like a daily outage in the US. I thought only fast-growing countries like china or developing countries had those problems.

    As the first poster said, "I was hit by the remnants of Ike as it went through Cincinnati" - Ike being the name of the hurricane.



  • Well, I guess to complete the zomg-firefox-isn't-really-the-solution-to-all-our-problems browser survey, I should mention that it loaded in five to ten seconds in Safari.



  •  Loaded up in about 8-10 seconds using FF 2.0.0.16, maybe it's FF3 that is the probem

     



  • @Juifeng said:

    @tchize said:

     Is this outage due to hurricane, ot is it normal daily outage in US?

    Well, I guess there is nothing like a daily outage in the US. I thought only fast-growing countries like china or developing countries had those problems.

    As the first poster said, "I was hit by the remnants of Ike as it went through Cincinnati" - Ike being the name of the hurricane.

    Sorry about that.  I sometimes forget that people outside the US visit the forums. 

    There are something like 325 thousand people without power still, which is most surprising if you look up Cincinnati on a map and see how far inland it is, then realize that the hurricane hit Cincinnati on Sunday.



  •  It is a bad page (though it's fine in IE, just bad in FF). I'm guess it's pretty snappy under normal conditions -- a handful of outages here and there, maybe a dozen after bad ice or wind. I've seen similar things from GIS systems with way to many data points; old versions of ARCGIS took forever to render large datasets and would give you a mess of labels and points like this.



  • Chrome loaded it in 5 seconds.



  • My stats:

    • IE7 approx 10 seconds
    • FF 3.0.1 took15 seconds to draw the green dots, then a whole mess of "customer(s) out" text was splattered over the screen making most of downtown black.  FF then locked up taking 100% of one of my cores.  Had to kill it to continue.

    Really impressed with this, it is obvious that nobody took into
    account a wide-spread outage like this during the design/QA process
    (that's assuming that it wasn't just given to a co-op as a semester
    project).  Has no-one heard of server-side rendering.  No wooden table required.

     

     



  • I just loaded it in IE6.  It came up in < 5 seconds. 

    Firefox currently locks up completely.  I started up (what I thought was) a separate instance of FF, but both windows got locked when I went to the map.

    I've reported this as a bug to the Mozilla group.  I have no idea whether they'll care about the issue, but I put a link to this thread in the bug report.  

    Also, there are now over 11 thousand images, but fewer outages.



  •  I feel like something like this has happened before, so I have to ask the obvious question:

    Are all of you FF users running with Adblock off or on?



  • @Fred Foobar said:

    I feel like something like this has happened before, so I have to ask the obvious question:

    Are all of you FF users running with Adblock off or on?

    I don't have AdBlock installed. 

    NoScript is installed but not blocking anything. 

    Greasemonkey is installed but I have no scripts activated. (Haven't needed them since TEDSBROTHERTED got banned).

    FF3.0.1 WinXP SP2



  • @belgariontheking said:

    I've reported this as a bug to the Mozilla group.  I have no idea whether they'll care about the issue, but I put a link to this thread in the bug report.
    Boris Zbowski, one of the most prolific QA engineers in the project, has taken up your issue, and it will be fixed as soon as possible. Apparently they now realize that an O(N³) operation every hundred aboslutely positioned objects per page is a bad idea when there are eleven thousand of them.



  • @Juifeng said:

    @tchize said:

     Is this outage due to hurricane, ot is it normal daily outage in US?

    Well, I guess there is nothing like a daily outage in the US. I thought only fast-growing countries like china or developing countries had those problems.

    As the first poster said, "I was hit by the remnants of Ike as it went through Cincinnati" - Ike being the name of the hurricane.

    I like Ike!



  • @belgariontheking said:

    Sorry about that.  I sometimes forget that people outside the US visit the forums. 

    There are something like 325 thousand people without power still, which is most surprising if you look up Cincinnati on a map and see how far inland it is, then realize that the hurricane hit Cincinnati on Sunday.


    WTH? That's 800 km from the nearest coastline! Just how far inland do those things usually go, and what kind of wind speeds do they produce there?



  • @fbjon said:

    @belgariontheking said:
    Sorry about that.  I sometimes forget that people outside the US visit the forums. 

    There are something like 325 thousand people without power still, which is most surprising if you look up Cincinnati on a map and see how far inland it is, then realize that the hurricane hit Cincinnati on Sunday.


    WTH? That's 800 km from the nearest coastline! Just how far inland do those things usually go, and what kind of wind speeds do they produce there?
    Maybe not the hurricane itself, but the aftereffects did hit them, like the increased storms and such. Mexico City is about 500 kms off coast, however when hurricanes hit the coastline, we get heavy rain.



  • @TwelveBaud said:

    Filed under: ahahaha Mike Hudson hahahah

    The worst part is that his real first name isn't even "Mike", it's far far far far more embarrassing than that.



  • @fbjon said:

    @belgariontheking said:
    Sorry about that.  I sometimes forget that people outside the US visit the forums. 

    There are something like 325 thousand people without power still, which is most surprising if you look up Cincinnati on a map and see how far inland it is, then realize that the hurricane hit Cincinnati on Sunday.


    WTH? That's 800 km from the nearest coastline! Just how far inland do those things usually go, and what kind of wind speeds do they produce there?

    When last seen, the remnants of Ike were heading off towards Greenland...



    More seriously, a hurricane will never go more than about 100km inland as a hurricane, but as an organized storm with heavy rains and strong straight-line winds, hurricanes will regularly cross the continent from south to north.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @TwelveBaud said:
    Filed under: ahahaha Mike Hudson hahahah
    The worst part is that his real first name isn't even "Mike", it's far far far far more embarrassing than that.
    Umm, and my name is pretty googleable, too.  Might even be able to find my FIRST name if you rape me in an alley and steal my business cards.



  • @Carnildo said:

    More seriously, a hurricane will never go more than about 100km inland as a hurricane, but as an organized storm with heavy rains and strong straight-line winds, hurricanes will regularly cross the continent from south to north.
    Yeah.  We didn't call it a hurricane, though it did do the worst damage that we've seen since ... hell I dunno, we had a flood in 1937.

    We didn't get any rain, just nasty winds.  There are still power outages occuring, because, as Duke Energy puts it, "Trees were weakened by the dourghts last year, and are continuing to break."  Some solace to the people still without power.

    The winds were South to North, but some fools tried to play an football game through it.  


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