Web 0.2: Wooden Table 2.0: Nylon carpet



  • This is flippin' beautiful: "FLIPP Explainers".

    The most tempting link is "To go Directly to Example FLIPP Diagrams click here" (and why wouldn't you?)

    After you've stopped laughing at the method of delivery, take a look through them. Despite "FLIPP" being introduced as something to replace hard-to-understand flow diagrams (?!), many of these examples are marked up with distictly "flow chart"-like symbols. (Y'know: arrows, a means of distinguishing input from output, the usual crap.)

    And then, just when you thought it couldn't get any better, you get to example 8. See if you can find where it came from!

    At least his carpet is clean...



  • And he's basically re-invented Nassi-Shneiderman diagrams from the 70's (which was the heyday of nylon carpets, so maybe it all makes sense).



  • @chumbley said:

    And he's basically re-invented Nassi-Shneiderman diagrams from the 70's (which was the heyday of nylon carpets, so maybe it all makes sense).

    Then maybe he invented the time machine, too?

    Look again at examples 11 & 12.



  •  lol, that's flippin awesome, if only html had some way of displaying tabular data...i guess 2MB+ digital photos will have to suffice until someone comes up with a way to do it

     



  • Awesome website.
    This is my favorite part:
    img src="_vti_bin/fpcount.exe/C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Joan/My%20Documents/My%20Webs/David%20Cox/?Page=index.html|Image=0" alt="Hit Counter"



  • @rfsmit said:

    Look again at examples 11 & 12.

     

     

    11: "HOW TO MAIL & SHIP THINGS FROM GENERAL OFFICES" ??
    12: "FOOD PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT" ??

    Is that? eyes hurt



  • @rfsmit said:

    @chumbley said:

    And he's basically re-invented Nassi-Shneiderman diagrams from the 70's (which was the heyday of nylon carpets, so maybe it all makes sense).

    Then maybe he invented the time machine, too?

    Look again at examples 11 & 12.

     

    Wow, that first one was nearly 50 years ago. I wonder what his filing system looks like!

    It's interesting that he seemed to be working at Proctor & Gamble (in example 12), as that was one of the earliest places to use flowcharts (in the 40's).



  •  Well, no matter how silly they are, I've not worked in a company yet that actually outlines procedures THIS INTUITIVELY.  I'd give my left foot to see somewhere that actaully makes things this obvious, God only knows there's times it necessary!



  • @shepd said:

     Well, no matter how silly they are, I've not worked in a company yet that actually outlines procedures THIS INTUITIVELY.  I'd give my left foot to see somewhere that actaully makes things this obvious, God only knows there's times it necessary!

     

    I mostly agree. It's the method of delivery that I was calling WTF on.

    "Mostly", because it's sometimes too flexible. Such as the case when the choice between two outcomes isn't clearly defined. (One of the examples exhibits this problem.) The flowchart equivalent is an unlabelled diamond.



  • @chumbley said:

    Wow, that first one was nearly 50 years ago. I wonder what his filing system looks like!

    It's interesting that he seemed to be working at Proctor & Gamble (in example 12), as that was one of the earliest places to use flowcharts (in the 40's).

    Its Joan's so its a her. See the hit counter link damnit.



  • @element[0] said:

     lol, that's flippin awesome, if only html had some way of displaying tabular data...i guess 2MB+ digital photos will have to suffice until someone comes up with a way to do it

     

    The table markup required to do this layout would be pretty hideous. colspans and rowspans all over the place.

    Apparently at least one of these pages is decades old, too, so it's not like he's got the raw data in a file to work from. The only copy he has is on paper. Ideally, yes, he should re-build these in HTML, but it would be a big time investment, and it doesn't look like it's worth the time to this guy.

    The thing that makes the original Wood Table WTF so spectacular, is that it features a binary file being rendered, printed, and then photographed, when only the first step is necessary. It's more complicated than doing things the right way.



  •  @astonerbum said:

    Its Joan's so its a her. See the hit counter link damnit.

    Damn funny looking woman



  • @merreborn said:

    The table markup required to do this layout would be pretty hideous. colspans and rowspans all over the place.

    Well, yeah... in the more complex cases. But at least it's possible, unlike, say, a flowchart. Also, if a change needs to be made, it would be simpler to do than to redraw by hand and photograph it.

    @merreborn said:

    Apparently at least one of these pages is decades old, too, so it's not like he's got the raw data in a file to work from.

    A piece of paper isn't raw data?

    @merreborn said:

    The only copy he has is on paper.

    Nope -- he has photographs of them too.

    @merreborn said:

    Ideally, yes, he should re-build these in HTML, but it would be a big time investment,

    For this guy? Yep.

    @merreborn said:

    and it doesn't look like it's worth the time to this guy.

    For this guy? Yes again.

    @merreborn said:

    The thing that makes the original Wood Table WTF so spectacular, is that it features a binary file being rendered, printed, and then photographed, when only the first step is necessary. It's more complicated than doing things the right way.
     

    And this is different from example eight in what way, precisely?

    Sigh -- okay, here it is on a plate:



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