Newegg promo mail with password?



  • Did anyone else get a sale email from Newegg this morning that asked for a password to load images?

    It took me 35+ clicks to get control of my web browser again. Argh.



  • escape not working?



  • I had that one to. I couldn't get out of it any other way until I finished hitting cancel for all the log in requests. At first I was worried about what was going wrong and then I just got pissed off.



  •  TRWTF is HTML email.



  • Gmail can disable showing external images, which I have on by default because I don't want to send feedback of the exact moment I read an email - mostly paranoia on my part about spam and hackers. All-external-image emails aren't actually telling me anything useful or important anyway.



  • @mattmillr said:

    Did anyone else get a sale email from Newegg this morning that asked for a password to load images? http://www.flickr.com/photos/mattmillr/2843159830/ It took me 35+ clicks to get control of my web browser again. Argh.

     

    Are you sure it was from Newegg, not phishing?



  •  Good point -- I thought. So I loaded Gmail up on another computer and opened the cursed promo again.

     Brand new WTF!! Escape dismisses the password dialog, but the main browser window steals the keyboard focus, so you have to click the next dialog box before you can press escape again. Wonderful. Now we're at 30 clicks PLUS 30 keypresses.



  • @alegr said:

    @mattmillr said:

    Did anyone else get a sale email from Newegg this morning that asked for a password to load images? http://www.flickr.com/photos/mattmillr/2843159830/ It took me 35+ clicks to get control of my web browser again. Argh.

     

    Are you sure it was from Newegg, not phishing?

    Just checked. Yep, it was actually promotions.newegg.com. Not promotions.newegg.com.wegotyou.badsite.haxor.ru.

     Good call though. I'm going to step outside now and kick myself for buying that 60" flat screen from the email after I clicked through all the passwords... the alt text made it look like a really good deal!



  • @ComputerForumUser said:

    Gmail can disable showing external images, which I have on by default because I don't want to send feedback of the exact moment I read an email - mostly paranoia on my part about spam and hackers. All-external-image emails aren't actually telling me anything useful or important anyway.

     

     Yep. Have that feature turned on. I just disabled it for newegg because, well, who doesn't want to be enticed to buy all kinds of new DVD-R/W drives and lazer mouses?



  • @mattmillr said:

    I'm going to step outside now and kick myself for buying that 60" flat screen from the email after I clicked through all the passwords... the alt text made it look like a really good deal!

    I'm kind of wishing it was a phishing scam and that they got your credit card. 



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    Filed under: Also: clear your damn spam folder!

    There is no point, Gmail clears it after 30 days anyways, why do something the computer will do for you?



  • @Lingerance said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    Filed under: Also: clear your damn spam folder!

    There is no point, Gmail clears it after 30 days anyways, why do something the computer will do for you?
    In fact, leaving it alone is the best option.  Unless you're going to manually go through looking for false positives, it's a bad idea to clear the folder any earlier than necessary.   You don't want to empty blindly, and then realize a week later that gmail stuck something important in there, like a registration code.



  • @merreborn said:

    @Lingerance said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    Filed under: Also: clear your damn spam folder!

    There is no point, Gmail clears it after 30 days anyways, why do something the computer will do for you?
    In fact, leaving it alone is the best option.  Unless you're going to manually go through looking for false positives, it's a bad idea to clear the folder any earlier than necessary.   You don't want to empty blindly, and then realize a week later that gmail stuck something important in there, like a registration code.

    Wow, fail.  You don't "clear blindly", you keep up with the spam as it comes in and check for false positives.  Those of us with real jobs and responsibilities can't afford to have important mail end up in the spam folder for 30 days.  What's more, with 1400 messages you know this guy isn't looking at all, he's just letting the spam get cleared automatically.  Finally, by clearing out spam you almost certainly help Google improve the accuracy of their filter and you free up space which reduces the cost of running the service.  Keeping up with your spam folder seems to be the only reasonable thing you can do. 



  • @merreborn said:

    @Lingerance said:
    @morbiuswilters said:
    Filed under: Also: clear your damn spam folder!

    There is no point, Gmail clears it after 30 days anyways, why do something the computer will do for you?
    In fact, leaving it alone is the best option.  Unless you're going to manually go through looking for false positives, it's a bad idea to clear the folder any earlier than necessary.   You don't want to empty blindly, and then realize a week later that gmail stuck something important in there, like a registration code.
    There's a simpler solution. Clear it before you EXPECT to get mail (like a confirmation number).  Then when you go searching, you won't have much to sift through.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @merreborn said:

    @Lingerance said:

    @morbiuswilters said:
    Filed under: Also: clear your damn spam folder!

    There is no point, Gmail clears it after 30 days anyways, why do something the computer will do for you?
    In fact, leaving it alone is the best option.  Unless you're going to manually go through looking for false positives, it's a bad idea to clear the folder any earlier than necessary.   You don't want to empty blindly, and then realize a week later that gmail stuck something important in there, like a registration code.

    Wow, fail.  You don't "clear blindly", you keep up with the spam as it comes in and check for false positives.  Those of us with real jobs and responsibilities can't afford to have important mail end up in the spam folder for 30 days.  What's more, with 1400 messages you know this guy isn't looking at all, he's just letting the spam get cleared automatically.  Finally, by clearing out spam you almost certainly help Google improve the accuracy of their filter and you free up space which reduces the cost of running the service.  Keeping up with your spam folder seems to be the only reasonable thing you can do. 

    I'm sure you know exactly what I'm doing.

    I clear it about once a week. I just cleared it - at over 1700 messages. That means I got about 300 spams in the past 28 hours. I've got better things to do that look at every one of them.

    In four years of using Gmail, I've averaged MAX one false positive a month -- almost always a registration code that I found within minutes near the top of my spam folder. I used to scan the folder religiously and never found any important messages in there, and I've never had a message go missing that I can attribute to the spam filters. Besides that, I'm just not that important. If I miss one email, the world will go on. Whitelist rules help too.

    Things are a lot better than they used to be. I'm averaging around 2,000 spam a week now. It's been as high as 10,000. That was a real WTF. You try keeping up with that many offers for misspelled pharmaceuticals.



  • I should add, newegg issued an apology last night.




    Dear e-Blast Subscriber,



    We apologize to those of you who experienced some technical difficulties when trying to open today's edition of the Newegg e-Blast Newsletter. One of our servers was temporarily down, causing the e-Blast to display incorrectly for some recipients.



    The e-Blast is now running correctly again, and we would like to reassure you that this was a purely internal technical issue—none of your private information has been accessed or leaked outside our secure network. We take our customers’ privacy very seriously and have run a thorough check to ensure that your personal data has not in any way been compromised, so please rest assured.



    This morning’s temporary server failure is an extremely rare occurrence at Newegg and we are putting additional measures in place to ensure a similar problem will not occur again. We apologize for the inconvenience this morning’s technical difficulties may have caused you and thank you for your understanding and patience with the situation.



    Sincerely,



    The Newegg e-Blast Team


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