Chrome - TODO: figure out a way to embed a real image



  • Like the rest of the internet, I'm giving Chrome a whirl and all is going so far so good. For fun, I thought I might look at the source code behind some of the pages specific to the browser like when you open a new tab and the "about" pages.



    Here's the source of the page when you open a new tab: view-source:chrome-resource://new-tab/



    Down on line 358, there's the beginning of code for the page's base64 encoded logo - great!



    Now, go on over to view-source:chrome-resource://about/ this the source for the page you see when about: is typed in the address bar.



    Down at line 36, you'll see an HTML comment reading: TODO: figure out a way to embed a real image



    With the next line being an image link to http://www.google.com/intl/en_ALL/images/logo.gif



  •  For more laughs, go to:

    view-source:chrome-resource://inspector/inspector.html

    and see which company own the copyright



  • In Chromium 0.2.152.0 (dev build 1819), the Google logo was replaced with a base64 embedded Chrome logo.

    inspector.html is unmodified webkit source, I guess.



  • @Juifeng said:

    inspector.html is unmodified webkit source, I guess.

    That would explain why it seems a total copy of Safari's inspector.



  • @dhromed said:

    @Juifeng said:
    inspector.html is unmodified webkit source, I guess.

    That would explain why it seems a total copy of Safari's inspector.

     

    You're right on the mark.



  • Personally, I don't look too much at "rendering speed" of browser engines anymore, because all pages I visit render almost instantly, and any slowdowns (FFX is notoriously slow with TDWTF) are due to other issues, such as FFX (hypothesis!) re-querying AJAX calls when pressing back/forward; something other browsers don't seem to do.



  • @dev3 said:

     For more laughs, go to:

    view-source:chrome-resource://inspector/inspector.html

    and see which company own the copyright


    Thats not funny... Google stated bluntly that they use the same rendering engine safari uses to render pages for chrome. They also state that if a page renders in correctly safari, it most likely renders correctly in chrome.




  • @dhromed said:

    Personally, I don't look too much at "rendering speed" of browser engines anymore, because all pages I visit render almost instantly, and any slowdowns (FFX is notoriously slow with TDWTF) are due to other issues, such as FFX (hypothesis!) re-querying AJAX calls when pressing back/forward; something other browsers don't seem to do.


    Thats because you don't visit client-heavy javascript based pages.



  • <SARCASM> Geez guys, its only BETA, you cannot criticize a BETA project </SARCASM>

     /Like Google and GMail

    // Thinks Google is evil for its overuse of BETA projects and doing full fledge launches of BETAs.



  • @matthewr81 said:

    <SARCASM> Geez guys, its only BETA, you cannot criticize a BETA project </SARCASM>

     /Like Google and GMail

    // Thinks Google is evil for its overuse of BETA projects and doing full fledge launches of BETAs.


    Google search was beta for a while. WINE was in beta for 10 years.

    I don't vouch for google caz its only in beta. Though they do abuse it just a bit... BUT the flip side is that when non-beta comes out it is expected to shit out gold.



  • @astonerbum said:

    @dhromed said:

    Personally, I don't look too much at "rendering speed" of browser engines anymore, because all pages I visit render almost instantly, and any slowdowns (FFX is notoriously slow with TDWTF) are due to other issues, such as FFX (hypothesis!) re-querying AJAX calls when pressing back/forward; something other browsers don't seem to do.


    Thats because you don't visit client-heavy javascript based pages.
    ...like gmail and google docs.  Which google has specifically pointed out as a leading use case for chrome.

     

    The "re-querying AJAX calls" issue is entirely up to the developer.  When you hit "back", onload is treated differently by some browsers (some run the onload again; some don't), and with good reason.  It's the developer's job to be aware of this, and make sure that their code behaves appropriately.



  • @dhromed said:

    Personally, I don't look too much at "rendering speed" of browser engines anymore, because all pages I visit render almost instantly, and any slowdowns (FFX is notoriously slow with TDWTF) are due to other issues, such as FFX (hypothesis!) re-querying AJAX calls when pressing back/forward; something other browsers don't seem to do.

     

    You really shouldn't be using Final Fantasy 10 to browse web pages anyway.


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