Quality education



  • I would certainly like to get my degree.  This email advertisement, however, does not provide much confidence in the education this "scool" is offering.

    DeVry Email Ad<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /><o:p></o:p>



  •  Hey! Mr. and Mrs. Scooling worked very hard to put their son Online through his marketing degree; don't you go insulting him like that.



  • Misspellings in spam messages are often deliberate in order to thwart Bayesian filters.



  • @D0R said:

    Misspellings in spam messages are often deliberate in order to thwart Bayesian filters.

    Which never works anyway.  Besides, this message hardly qualifies as normal spam and the only typeo is in the subject.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @D0R said:

    Misspellings in spam messages are often deliberate in order to thwart Bayesian filters.

    Which never works anyway.  Besides, this message hardly qualifies as normal spam and the only typeo is in the subject.

     

    I agree that it never (or rarely) works, but if it did work, only misspelling the subject might be a good way to go about it. Granted, I might have noticed this mistake in the main inbox view, but in this image I didn't. I read the body of the message several times. Eventually looking only for the word "school," convinced that my mind was auto-correcting a typo. I eventually gave up and only after reading some of the other comments did I even glance at the subject. After the message is opened, my brain treats the header info as irrelevant.

    Too bad I'd possibly notice in the inbox view, though...


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