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  • We've seen variations on the "e-mail is not working" e-mail, but here's a nice twist: the "please make sure your e-mail works" e-mail.

    This also reminds me a bit of somebody who is trying too hard to be your friend but won't take the hint.




  •  I'm not sure I see the WTF.

    Bayesian spam filtering is, in many cases, relatively unpredictable.  With speakeasy's bayesian filter, I've seen identical copies of the exact same email filtered and not filtered, when sent via different personal addresses (none of which had ever been used in any sort of mass mailing).

    Over time, I've seen up to half of my email from some sites filtered by yahoo, while the other half from the same sites made it to my inbox without issue -- even in the same day.

     

    With this in mind, it's reasonable to assume that this email might reach the inboxes of some of united's customers, while other of united's emails to those same customers are being filtered.  And some of those people may actually want those emails.



  • I don't think the concept is so odd, but I am amused by their "instructions", which effectively amount to saying "to add a contact to your address book, just add this address to your address book!"  The meaningless icons are a nice touch as well.



  • @Aaron said:

    The meaningless icons are a nice touch as well.
    I believe the "meaningless icons" you refer to are actually a new feature of FF3 that renders illegal characters in that square format.   Other browsers just strip them from the page entirely.  I encountered them recently when some non-breaking space characters were getting mangled by some improper character encoding.

     

    I haven't found any documentation on this feature, but it was added to FF3 some time between the beta and the final release version.  Specifically, my virtual machine installation of 3.0b4 does not have this feature, but the official 3.0 release does.



  • @merreborn said:

    I believe the "meaningless icons" you refer to are actually a new feature of FF3 that renders illegal characters in that square format.

    Firefox has done this for years for me.  This is not a new feature.  It may be OS-dependent, though. 



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @merreborn said:

    I believe the "meaningless icons" you refer to are actually a new feature of FF3 that renders illegal characters in that square format.

    Firefox has done this for years for me.  This is not a new feature.  It may be OS-dependent, though. 

    It's entirely possible that it's tied to some obscure entry in about:config that used to default false, but now defaults to true, or something.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @merreborn said:

    I believe the "meaningless icons" you refer to are actually a new feature of FF3 that renders illegal characters in that square format.

    Firefox has done this for years for me.  This is not a new feature.  It may be OS-dependent, though. 

    Same here.  I remember this on FF1.  I know it definitely did this on the Fedora and RedHat Linuxes.  I am fairly certain it also did this on the Windows XP machines I used in my school's computer lab, but I am not certain.  No clue about Macs, though.



  • @WeatherGod said:

    Linii
    FTFY



  • @WeatherGod said:

    No clue about Macs, though.

    Macs use a different (and harder-to-read) set of fallback glyphs: the LastResort font.



  • @belgariontheking said:

    @WeatherGod said:

    Linii
    FTFY

    I would argue that you are incorrect. Linux has -ux as a suffix and thus does not fall into any standard grammatical category. Thus, -es comes as a natural standard-case plural suffix. See this for confirmation.


    Linii would be the plural of Linus, though.



  • @Carnildo said:

    @WeatherGod said:
    No clue about Macs, though.

    Macs use a different (and harder-to-read) set of fallback glyphs: the LastResort font.

    If I understand Apple's Glyph table right, Unicode has just become a whole lot more WTFy for me though.

    I mean, I can understand Kyrillic, Arabic and most likely even Suaheli. But, seriously, come on:

    What's next? Sindarin?



  • @archivator said:

    Linii would be the plural of Linus, though.
    The problem with society today is it punishes people like me for stabbing people like you when you say things like this. I don't want to kill you or anything; I just want to stab you until you learn. You're one of those people who thinks the plural of virus is "virii", I bet.

    @archivator said:

    Linux has -ux as a suffix and thus does not fall into any standard grammatical category.
    Continuing with the stabbing, a better way to say this is that Linux is a Finnish coined word and therefore would be pluralized however the fuck Linus wants it to be pluralized. Considering you would pluralize Linus in a Latin-y way, I find it interesting that you ignore the fact that -ux is a proper Latin third-declension noun suffix, whose plural is probably -ces but can also be -ges. But as a "virii" proliferator I don't expect you to know that.

    Stop pretending to know things you don't know. Holy fuck, people. The world would be a better place if we all just stopped pretending to be smart all the fucking time.



  • @PSWorx said:

    @Carnildo said:

    @WeatherGod said:
    No clue about Macs, though.

    Macs use a different (and harder-to-read) set of fallback glyphs: the LastResort font.

    If I understand Apple's Glyph table right, Unicode has just become a whole lot more WTFy for me though.

    I mean, I can understand Kyrillic, Arabic and most likely even Suaheli. But, seriously, come on:

    What's next? Sindarin?


    You were saying?
    But seriously, you have to realize - these are in the extended planes. There are over one million code points available in unicode, not just the 65 thousand you're used to. (that said, I was sure Klingon got rejected on the grounds that people who actually write in it use the latin alphabet.)


  • @WeatherGod said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @merreborn said:

    I believe the "meaningless icons" you refer to are actually a new feature of FF3 that renders illegal characters in that square format.

    Firefox has done this for years for me.  This is not a new feature.  It may be OS-dependent, though. 

    Same here.  I remember this on FF1.  I know it definitely did this on the Fedora and RedHat Linuxes.  I am fairly certain it also did this on the Windows XP machines I used in my school's computer lab, but I am not certain.  No clue about Macs, though.

    Linux distributions have actually done this for a long time, and it's not the same as the new firefox feature (the ones in firefox are rendered as a bitmap font in two colors; the ones that GTK did were rendered as outlines based on the selected font)



  • @Welbog said:

    I don't want to kill you or anything; I just want to stab you until you learn.

    You seem to be misunderstanding me. Like, totally.

    I am against the "virii" crowd. It just doesn't make sense, trying to apply rules of a long-dead language to an ever-evolving and widely used contemporary language. Languages are not backward compatible.

    All I tried to say in that last post that you stabbed so well, was that belgariontheking's correction was inherently flawed. There was absolutely no basis for his "FTFY" comment as it was pretty far from anything a normal person would say or appreciate as humorous.

    I too thought of the -ces suffix though, I admit, my interest in Latin has always been superficial and I, in fact, lack the proper academic training.

    I guess I was nitpicking at belgariontheking. Honestly, though, I still think I was right. This -ii stuff is seriously irritating. Stop it. Please.

    </end of riposte. Or parry. Depends.>



  • @archivator said:

    I guess I was nitpicking at belgariontheking.
    Well then I guess I stabbed the wrong person. I guess I'm going to go to jail now. Since I'm going anyway, I might as well stab belgariontheking a few times before they take me away.



  • @Random832 said:

    (that said, I was sure Klingon got rejected on the grounds that people who actually write in it use the latin alphabet.)

    It was - it's not in the Unicode standard.

    Instead, it's placed in a Private Use Area (as is Tengwar/Cirth). The ConScript Unicode Registry coordinates the use of those parts of Unicode in there (unofficially, of course - and actually, I seem to recall reading somewhere that Apple put their Apple key glyph in the same part as Klingon uses).



  • @Pidgeot said:

    It was - it's not in the Unicode standard.

    Instead, it's placed in a Private Use Area (as is Tengwar/Cirth). The ConScript Unicode Registry coordinates the use of those parts of Unicode in there

    Alright, that makes more sense. Still, some approvals of the registry seem ... um ... rather questionable to me...


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