Doing stuff at home,



  • So I am new to IT (still student) but what i have read on this side is that building good Software is hard. You ned a wide range of skills and a good team to build good Code. But do we not forget the human factor?

    My question: 

        Do you have own IT realted hobbys? Specific do you Programs at home?

    I think that writing a Program is more Art than Working.  Because  all our Applications start with an Idea in our Brains and we have to train it to come up  with ideas and even more important to explain this to others so they understand them like there own Ideas.  And to learn this you have to do it on your own because at Work you have to deliver someone others concept.

     I read books about this topic, write little application (most of it will never befinished) and watch google tech talks to become a better coder. Many WTFs are made because people didn't know better. But if you do crap and than leave it or give it away, you never realize that you have faild at home nobody else is to blame!

    So do you write Code at home, what sort or do you even have an expample?

    Thank you

          Elektro (yes I am German, but can you write anything else than your naitiv tongue?)



  • @elektro said:

    yes I am German, but can you write anything else than your naitiv tongue?
     

    I sure can't, but I also don't try and post on German (or other) forums either.



  • I write lots of code at home, but I get paid for it ;-p

    Besides that, I write little programs at home every now and then. But it's mostly because I want or need that stuff (tools etc.), not because of learning new languages etc. You might also find a few contributions of me in the coder challenge section.

    BTW, I think you can only become real good when you are good at work. Toy projects at home are mostly not large and sophisticated enough to teach the value of good practices. E.g. when you work alone on your project, version management might not be much of a topic. Since no-one forces you to maintain your toy project for 8 years, you might never realise the importance of good documentation, style, comments etc.



  • I don't think that doing programming work at home on your own time necessarily causes you to be a better developer. I think that good developers naturally just want to do this kind of stuff as a hobby. I don't think one causes the other, just that they are correlated.

    That said, lots of us here have any number of hobby projects we work on on the side. Whether it's open-source software development, making simple scripts at home to automate common tasks and make life easier, or making stupid IRC bots to annoy your friends.

    Personally, I work on stupid stuff that I find interesting. Like the aforementioned IRC bot, mathy Java applets, homebrew blog software, programming contest entries and others.

    Some of the crazier among us make things like desktop search apps or BASIC+FORTH interpreters for their fictional gaming consoles.

    If you can't see yourself enjoying making a homebrew app for personal use, then how can you possibly enjoy implementing someone else's ideas? To me, doing the design work is a lot more fun and engaging than writing code for someone else's design. If I didn't even enjoy writing my own designs, then I don't see how I could enjoy writing someone else's.



  • @ammoQ said:

    BTW, I think you can only become real good when you are good at work. Toy projects at home are mostly not large and sophisticated enough to teach the value of good practices. E.g. when you work alone on your project, version management might not be much of a topic. Since no-one forces you to maintain your toy project for 8 years, you might never realise the importance of good documentation, style, comments etc.
    I largely agree with this, but I think the home projects serve a really important purpose. While I was introduced to source control in a work environment, I only became a whole-hearted supporter of it when I realized how useful it was even for my personal pet projects.  At work, I used it because that's where the code was, and it was the only thing that made sense in a multi-developer environment.

    When it comes to anything related to good programming practices, the person you have to convince is yourself, and that usually happens during your pet projects. 



  • I do write many programs at home. Usually for myself but sometimes I do what someone else asks of me, and expects it to take a few days but it takes only half an hour or so and they say it is a good program. You don't need a team of programmers to write a program and you don't need a year. Just a few days or hours and 1 person is enough to write a program. Sometimes I make mistake, but then later I will learn better. Real programmers to not need to take a class at school to learn programming. One day, I was hired at a company to make a time-sheets system and they expect it to take a few weeks but it only took a few hours and it had more and better function than they expected, and then I would go home. A real programmer is someone with a natural sense of algorithm, and also, real programmers spend 70 percent of their work day fiddling around and then get more done in the other 30 percent than a user could get done in a week. This is a quote but I know it is true because I have always been like that and now I realized other people are like that as well and can make a quotation about it.



  • @zzo38 said:

    I do write many programs at home. Usually for myself but sometimes I do what someone else asks of me, and expects it to take a few days but it takes only half an hour or so and they say it is a good program. You don't need a team of programmers to write a program and you don't need a year. Just a few days or hours and 1 person is enough to write a program. Sometimes I make mistake, but then later I will learn better. Real programmers to not need to take a class at school to learn programming. One day, I was hired at a company to make a time-sheets system and they expect it to take a few weeks but it only took a few hours and it had more and better function than they expected, and then I would go home. A real programmer is someone with a natural sense of algorithm, and also, real programmers spend 70 percent of their work day fiddling around and then get more done in the other 30 percent than a user could get done in a week. This is a quote but I know it is true because I have always been like that and now I realized other people are like that as well and can make a quotation about it.
     

     "Cocaine is a helluva drug." - Rick James



  • @Welbog said:

    I think that good developers naturally just want to do this kind of stuff as a hobby.
    I agree with this.  I think it's a matter of doing something you really enjoy.  That's what's great about programming.  There are plenty of opportunities (well, when She Who Must Be Obeyed will allow it, anyway) to develop software outside of a job.  So you can do something you truly enjoy, while possibly helping your career.



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    "Cocaine is a helluva drug." - Rick James
    That may be true but how is that relevant?



  • @zzo38 said:

    @MasterPlanSoftware said:
    "Cocaine is a helluva drug." - Rick James
    That may be true but how is that relevant?
     

    Sorry, I should make my insults of you clearer.

    You sound like a retarded coke head.



  • @zzo38 said:

    I do write many programs at home. Usually for myself but sometimes I do what someone else asks of me, and expects it to take a few days but it takes only half an hour or so and they say it is a good program. You don't need a team of programmers to write a program and you don't need a year. Just a few days or hours and 1 person is enough to write a program. Sometimes I make mistake, but then later I will learn better. Real programmers to not need to take a class at school to learn programming. One day, I was hired at a company to make a time-sheets system and they expect it to take a few weeks but it only took a few hours and it had more and better function than they expected, and then I would go home. A real programmer is someone with a natural sense of algorithm, and also, real programmers spend 70 percent of their work day fiddling around and then get more done in the other 30 percent than a user could get done in a week. This is a quote but I know it is true because I have always been like that and now I realized other people are like that as well and can make a quotation about it.
     

     

    Aren't you the one who is always asking us to look at your non-functioning code? Which causes people to tell you that you should have your programming license revolked.


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