The musketeers have a secret mission



  •  I was assigned a simple task a few days ago. I had to write a simple string check class, then use it somewhere in the Big Application of ours. I started by writing a unit test and it worked (I said the check was simple. I'm not bragging here). Since I had finished sooner than I expected, I thought about writing a unit test for the class that would use the check, because there was none.

    Soon it became obvious that the idea wasn't so great: it was impossible to create an object without some magical, not documented pre-requisites. For instance, the class used heavily session data and an array of 3 different objects passed 3 times by reference, serialized, restored, extended, lost, found, stabbed, shot, recreated from scratch, and the array was conveniently called "data".

    When my unit test constructor achieved 40 lines of code, the whole thing seemed to finally live long enough to perform a few simple tricks. I felt like a magician muttering spells and drawing pentagrams around a portal to summon the beast, whose only trick was to make cold coffee. The effort wasn't worth it, but I was so far into it, that I didn't want to give up half way through.

    And then I stumbled about this nicely documented variable used as some sort of identifier:

     class Block {

    [snipped some 50 variables]

    /

      don't know what it does... ask Sophie

    */

     var $aramis = $_SESSION['aramis'];

    [snip]

    }

     Still no sign of Porthos or Athos, but I'm pretty sure they're somewhere near.



  • Maybe it is meant to be read as ar..amis: an array of French friends?...

    Or an array of RAM inputs streams?

     

    Ok, I give up. 



  •  How do we know that the author isn't referring to the cologne? Maybe he wanted a variable that smelled good. 



  • @pitchingchris said:

    How do we know that the author isn't referring to the cologne? Maybe he wanted a variable that smelled good.

    Or whose contents weren't vulnerable to Brut-force attacks.

     



  • "All for one and one for all"... must be a singleton.



  • @The General said:

    @pitchingchris said:

    How do we know that the author isn't referring to the cologne? Maybe he wanted a variable that smelled good.

    Or whose contents weren't vulnerable to Brut-force attacks.

     

    There is a special place in hell for those who use bad^h^h^h puns, I think it's right next to the Flatulant Beast of Sauerkraut's bedpan. 

     

    May the Flying Spagheti Monster have mercy on your soul.

     
    ~Sticky



  • @StickyWidget said:

    May the Flying Spagheti Monster have mercy on your soul.

    Tell him to bring in meatballs and garlic bread and we'll have a potluck.



  • @pitchingchris said:

    @StickyWidget said:

    May the Flying Spagheti Monster have mercy on your soul.

    Tell him to bring in meatballs and garlic bread and we'll have a potluck.

    Oh no... I just ate spaghetti and meatballs for lunch. Spooky. Anyway, I'm already going to hell for using over-using foreign words when there's a perfectly slušné English one.



  • @StickyWidget said:

    There is a special place in hell for those who use bad^h^h^h puns.

    May the Flying Spagheti Monster have mercy on our souls.


    FTFY - waits for penny to drop - ducks.



  • @The General said:

    I'm already going to hell for using over-using foreign words when there's a perfectly slušné English one.

     Yay! I've just learnt a foreign word:  slušné = cromulent.



  • @NeoMojo said:

    @The General said:

    I'm already going to hell for using over-using foreign words when there's a perfectly slušné English one.

     Yay! I've just learnt a foreign word:  slušné = cromulent.

    Yay!  I've just learned an English word.  cromulent = fine, acceptable.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.