Peanuts



  • I had no idea that peanuts were processed in a facility that processes peanuts. 

    Peanuts



  • In this day and age where anyone might be on a hair-trigger for a lawsuit, I find it not surprising that someone might want to cover their asses even when it should be obvious.



  • Standard CYA warning for all food like this. People have allergies to nuts and such.

    It may seem a little redundant,  but it does say "other nuts" which might be important in this case.



  •  Exemplum gratum: I am allergic to nuts (the type that grows on trees) and the effect of eating any is my throat starting to swell shut. It can get really ugly to try a tracheotomy on me in a metal cylinder screaming along at 40,000ft. Heck, some moronic sky marshal might mistake my flailing for a terrorist attack and shoot me.

     Whereas, I can eat legumes (peanuts and pistacchios, "nuts" that grow on bushes) just fine.

    Having no desire to either be shot or have my neck be operated on with a ball-pen, I'm happy for the warning. 



  • That's actually kind of interesting. I've always wondered why peanut allergies are so common, but I've never heard of anyone being allergic to every other nut before.



  • TRWTF is that it says "other nuts," implying a peanut is a nut.

    A peanut is neither a pea nor a nut!



  • That has been on M&M bags in my countries since 2 decades ago.
    Then again, some find Holland TRWTF™



  • @aquanight said:

    I find it not surprising that someone might
    want to cover their asses even when it should be obvious.
     

     

    Dude, if your ass is "obvious", that's exactly when you should cover it! 




  • Full of muggy goodness



  • @indigoparadox said:

    TRWTF is that it says "other nuts," implying a peanut is a nut.

    A peanut is neither a pea nor a nut!

    It is too a pea! 

    @wikipedia yeh I know but what can you do? said:

     

    The word pea describes the edible seeds of many other legumes in the Fabaceae family, and in that sense, a peanut is a kind of pea.  (The Fabaceae or Leguminosae are a large and economically important family of flowering plants, which is commonly known as the legume family, pea family, bean family or pulse family.)

     

     



  • @Cap'n Steve said:

    I've always wondered why peanut allergies are so common
     

    My theory is the over-abundance of dirty-fearing parents. "OMG, baby's touched something that hasn't been cleaned in the last 10 seconds! Quick, to the Lysol cave!". It's that last 0.1% of the bacteria lysol kills that's going to take over the world, or kill us all via peanut bombs.

    As for the OP, at least Peanuts were listed first. I've had a few of those packets where it tasted more of salt than peanuts. 



  • @Cap'n Steve said:

    That's actually kind of interesting. I've always wondered why peanut allergies are so common, but I've never heard of anyone being allergic to every other nut before.
    Have you ever tried to read more than four strips of Peanuts? That shit will make anyone sick.



  • @marakai said:

    Having no desire to either be shot or have my neck be operated on with a ball-pen, I'm happy for the warning. 
     

    TRWTF is not the warning in general, since it does make sense on items where it's not immediately obvious if it contains traces of nuts, such as candy and cereal. But with allergies so severe as yours, I'd assume the big bold label on the front saying "Dry Roasted Peanuts" would be enough of a warning.

    I mean, what is this country coming to? Recently I saw the standard "Do not attempt" warning on a TV spot where a woman was throwing the washing machine from the roof of her house. Really? We need a written warning for this?



  • @lilakuh said:

    Recently I saw the standard "Do not attempt" warning on a TV spot where a woman was throwing the washing machine from the roof of her house. Really? We need a written warning for this?
     

    I think it would be great fun to toss a washer from my roof. Why shouldn't I attempt this? 



  • @lilakuh said:

    Really? We need a written warning for this?

    No, but all companies and manufacturers do. Otherwise, they'll get sued and one way or another the consumer will pay for it. There are plenty of websites that have lists of "Stupid Warning Labels" or "Wacky Warning Labels". Here are a couple.




    http://www.power-of-attorneys.com/wacky_warning_labels.asp



    There are also sites that take it to the extreme and 'shop fake labels onto things. Some are quite hilarious.



  • @lilakuh said:

    But with allergies so severe as yours, I'd assume the big bold label on the front saying "Dry Roasted Peanuts" would be enough of a warning.
     

    Apparently you have not been listening. 

    Some people can eat all the peanuts they want. But if they come in any kind of indirect contact from other nuts, they could die.

    Therefore if they are going to enjoy a bag of peanuts like you show here, it would be very important information that those peanuts have possibly been in contact with other nuts which could kill them.

     

    Do you understand now?



  • @lilakuh said:

    But with allergies so severe as yours, I'd assume the big bold label on the front saying "Dry Roasted Peanuts" would be enough of a warning.

    Or, you know, not, since the whole point of  the post was that marakai isn't allergic to peanuts.



  • @Mr_Bad_Example said:

    @lilakuh said:

    But with allergies so severe as yours, I'd assume the big bold label on the front saying "Dry Roasted Peanuts" would be enough of a warning.

    Or, you know, not, since the whole point of  the post was that marakai isn't allergic to peanuts.

     

     Now be honest with me, if marakai has life-threatening allergies to nuts, wouldn't you think he'd approach a bag of peanuts with appropriate caution? It's common sense that a peanut processing plant also proceses other nuts.

     I guess this is my whole point. Thanks to a couple of idiots with no common sense (I.e., people who actually do need a "do not slam on finger" warning on a hammer) I'm slowly using my faith in mankind.

     



  • @lilakuh said:

    It's common sense that a peanut processing plant also proceses other nuts.
     

    No it isn't. You would expect a peanut plant to process peanuts. I would never anticipate that they would have walnuts in there.

    I am sure people with allergies would be cautious, but it seems to me this is the least a food vendor can do to handle this problem.



  • @marakai said:

    I am allergic to nuts (the type that grows on trees)... [w]hereas, I can eat legumes (peanuts and pistacchios, "nuts" that grow on bushes) just fine.

     

     So the package of peanuts should really just say "Processed in a facility that processes nuts."  The peanut part is obvious.  This is just a warning to the nut-allergic folks.

     A better wording would be "Processed in a facility that processes peanuts and nuts." Then everybody is informed, and the only ones confused will be those who think that "peanuts and" is redundant.



  • @medialint said:

    @lilakuh said:

    Recently I saw the standard "Do not attempt"
    warning on a TV spot where a woman was throwing the washing machine
    from the roof of her house. Really? We need a written warning for
    this?
     

    I think it would be great fun to toss a washer from my roof. Why shouldn't I attempt this? 

     

    Well, did you never consider that he might not want you to toss him off?

     



  • @medialint said:

    @lilakuh said:

    Recently I saw the standard "Do not attempt" warning on a TV spot where a woman was throwing the washing machine from the roof of her house. Really? We need a written warning for this?
     

    I think it would be great fun to toss a washer from my roof. Why shouldn't I attempt this? 

    If you say so. Personally I can't see much appeal in chucking little metal rings around (unless it's off a really tall building), and why not just do it out a window anyway?



  • @m0ffx said:

    @medialint said:

    @lilakuh said:

    Recently I saw the standard "Do not attempt" warning on a TV spot where a woman was throwing the washing machine from the roof of her house. Really? We need a written warning for this?
     

    I think it would be great fun to toss a washer from my roof. Why shouldn't I attempt this? 

    If you say so. Personally I can't see much appeal in chucking little metal rings around (unless it's off a really tall building), and why not just do it out a window anyway?

    Defenestration FTW.

    As for the original post, I really wouldn't like to come into contact with any food that could possibly have been in direct contact with someone's (or some animal's) nuts. That's just disgusting. So I think the warning is appropriate.



  •  As others have stated in my defense: no, I really do not see how I should presume that peanut salting/packing/processing equipment would also be used for other (actual) nuts.

    But, I thought I'd add, just to confuse things (and I had to have a specialist in nutritional medicine explain it to me to understand):

    I love Indian food. I eat it often.

    If you take any average Indian recipe, you will see it is full of nuts in the sauces, nutsy and legumy! I'm still alive after years of Indian food.

    Which had actually led me to believe it was a pure "all in my head" allergy - psychosomatic, if you will. I once got sick off something (insect bite?), had nuts, made wrong connection.

    Until the day I had a bad episode off a dish with raw nuts in it, and i didn't know they were there. Was told by a sheepish looking cook after I recovered and asked. And it was a dish you wouldn't even expect nuts in - was their "personal touch". Or attempted murder, I dunno...

    Enter the specialist, who explained to me that the allergy is brought about by a protein (always comes down to those buggers in the end), which breaks down when nuts are ground/chopped and then cooked in the spicy sauces. The sauce coating also helps cover whatever vestiges of the protein remain. No protein, no allergic reaction.

    Peanuts and nuts have different proteins (in the same way some people are allergic to cats but not other animals - different proteins that you react to), so you can react to one not the other.

    What's interesting - getting back to the labeling WTF the long way around - is that apparently when those companies switch between the product the machines process, they must not use (sufficient) heat when cleaning them in between. Otherwise these nasty proteins would break down and it would no longer be an issue. 

    Though I am in agreement with the poster who wrote about the increase in over-sensitive kids as a result to totally pampered immune systems, thanks to anti-bactericidal soaps, antibiotics for colds and what not. Heck, in our house, if we drop food it's ours if we're faster than the dogs in getting to it (good luck with that...)! Dirt builds character!

     



  • @indigoparadox said:

    TRWTF is that it says "other nuts," implying a peanut is a nut.

    A peanut is neither a pea nor a nut!

    A fishstick is neither a fish nor a stick, it is a fungus.



  • @marakai said:

    If you take any average Indian recipe, you will see it is full of nuts in the sauces, nutsy and legumy!

    Reminds me of the sesame seed scene in Antitrust. (I know.. neither nuts or Indian, but it's a food allergy).

    @marakai said:

    Though I am in agreement with the poster who wrote about the increase in over-sensitive kids as a result to totally pampered immune systems, thanks to anti-bactericidal soaps, antibiotics for colds and what not. Heck, in our house, if we drop food it's ours if we're faster than the dogs in getting to it (good luck with that...)! Dirt builds character!

    I'm also in agreement with that one. I want to slap parents that freak if you touch their baby without washing your hands first.



  • @lilakuh said:

    @Mr_Bad_Example said:

    @lilakuh said:

    But with allergies so severe as yours, I'd assume the big bold label on the front saying "Dry Roasted Peanuts" would be enough of a warning.

    Or, you know, not, since the whole point of  the post was that marakai isn't allergic to peanuts.

     

     Now be honest with me, if marakai has life-threatening allergies to nuts, wouldn't you think he'd approach a bag of peanuts with appropriate caution? It's common sense that a peanut processing plant also proceses other nuts.

     

    It the difference between assumption and confirmation, you know. Very likely quite important for marakai .... in this case. 

    @lilakuh said:

     I guess this is my whole point. Thanks to a couple of idiots with no common sense (I.e., people who actually do need a "do not slam on finger" warning on a hammer) I'm slowly using my faith in mankind.

      Faith in mankind is a sign of immaturity. Purple cow my ass .....

     



  • @AbbydonKrafts said:

    Reminds me of the sesame seed scene in Antitrust. (I know.. neither nuts or Indian, but it's a food allergy).
    God, what a lame scene movie that was. Did you know Linux Torvalds was a technical adviser for the movie?



  • @bstorer said:

    God, what a lame scene movie that was. Did you know Linux Torvalds was a technical adviser for the movie?

    I actually like the movie. Sure, it's not very realistic, but it's still entertaining to me. I like Pirates of Silicon Valley more, though.



    I didn't know Linus was an adviser for it.



  • @AbbydonKrafts said:

    I actually like the movie. Sure, it's not very realistic, but it's still entertaining to me. I like Pirates of Silicon Valley more, though.
    It was okay. It's not as irritating as, say, Hackers, but it tries way too hard to be intense. Also, it's been a while, so I may be misremembering, but isn't the code released at the end written in Java?



  • @bstorer said:

    It's not as irritating as, say, Hackers.

    Oh man.. I really hate it when movies and TV shows try to act like hacking is so easy. I wanted to puke with Swordfish.

    @bstorer said:

    But it tries way too hard to be intense.

    Yeah. It was a little overboard.

    @bstorer said:

    Also, it's been a while, so I may be misremembering, but isn't the code released at the end written in Java?

    Dunno. It's been a while since I've seen it. I've watched too many movies since then.



  • @AbbydonKrafts and pesto said:

    <diatribe about antitrust>
    It has been decided.  I'm watching Antitrust this weekend while I get drunk.



  • @belgariontheking said:

    @AbbydonKrafts and pesto said:

    <diatribe about antitrust>
    It has been decided.  I'm watching Antitrust this weekend while I get drunk.

    What a sad way to spend a weekend.



  • @bstorer said:

    What a sad way to spend a weekend.

    I usually just sit in my underwear and get drunk, so at least a movie would drown out my sobs. 



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    @bstorer said:

    What a sad way to spend a weekend.

    I usually just sit in my underwear and get drunk, so at least a movie would drown out my sobs. 

     

    Doesn't that require a TV?



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    @morbiuswilters said:

    @bstorer said:

    What a sad way to spend a weekend.

    I usually just sit in my underwear and get drunk, so at least a movie would drown out my sobs. 

     

    Doesn't that require a TV?

    Well, see, my laptop is one of those fancy new models that has a DVD play-- 

    @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    Filed under: Even sadder would be watching it on your laptop on the couch in your underwear getting drunk.

    Oh.  cough



  • @marakai said:

    Though I am in agreement with the poster who wrote about the increase in over-sensitive kids as a result to totally pampered immune systems, thanks to anti-bactericidal soaps, antibiotics for colds and what not.

    I've encountered a hypothesis, which I'm not qualified to judge, to the effect that the sharp increase in severe peanut allergies in children started a couple of years after companies started using peanut oil instead of mineral oil in their baby oil.* The idea is that peanut oil (or any other plant-based oil product) on a bad case of diaper rash could, in some cases, lead to a serious immune system reaction.  And therefore, in future, the body would "recognize" the peanut proteins as a toxin, and react accordingly.  But, as I say, I'm not an allergist or an immunologist or anything, so that could all be a load of hooey.

     

    *(They stopped making baby oil out of actual babies in the early 1900s.)

     

     



  • @Mr_Bad_Example said:

    *(They stopped making baby oil out of actual babies in the early 1900s.)
    And a good thing, too. Do you know how hard it is to have a baby that is allergic to babies?



  • @Mr_Bad_Example said:

    @marakai said:

    Though I am in agreement with the poster who wrote about the increase in over-sensitive kids as a result to totally pampered immune systems, thanks to anti-bactericidal soaps, antibiotics for colds and what not.

    I've encountered a hypothesis, which I'm not qualified to judge, to the effect that the sharp increase in severe peanut allergies in children started a couple of years after companies started using peanut oil instead of mineral oil in their baby oil.* The idea is that peanut oil (or any other plant-based oil product) on a bad case of diaper rash could, in some cases, lead to a serious immune system reaction.  And therefore, in future, the body would "recognize" the peanut proteins as a toxin, and react accordingly.  But, as I say, I'm not an allergist or an immunologist or anything, so that could all be a load of hooey.

     

    *(They stopped making baby oil out of actual babies in the early 1900s.)

     

     

     Most other epidomologists (xsue me laguage, I'm fogeirn)  propagate the exact opposite. Childeren coming in contact to less and less antigens ("antigenen", the identifiers all organisms have) causes the immume system to react to innocent ones (like the one's on peanuts or pollen). Furthermore, I think it's unlikely that a rash leads to a immume response, more the other way around. The immume system neither does work like a sentient organism. "O, I had a rash yesterday and I ate peanuts. Lets destroy all future peanuts".

    Also, all allergies have been on the rise for a few decades, so unless baby-product suddenly started including pollen etc, I don't think that's the cause. ;) 

     



  • @bstorer said:

    @AbbydonKrafts said:
    I actually like the movie. Sure, it's not very realistic, but it's still entertaining to me. I like Pirates of Silicon Valley more, though.
    It was okay. It's not as irritating as, say, Hackers,

    Hey, at least Hackers broke the "geeky kid" image that Revenge of the Nerds imposed upon most CS folks!@bstorer said:

    but it tries way too hard to be intense.

    Yeah. Bill Gates buys out and/or financially breaks its competition, he doesn't actually kill them ;)@bstorer said:

    Also, it's been a while, so I may be misremembering, but isn't the code released at the end written in Java?

    Yup, I remember the final "compile" showing "Synapse.java".

    Funny thing is, the movie's intro has HTML scrolling there; the "code" that the "Gates" guy passes on is actually C (source code for bzip2), but the final thingy is done in Java. Multi-platform!



  • @danixdefcon5 said:

    Hey, at least Hackers broke the "geeky kid" image that Revenge of the Nerds imposed upon most CS folks!

    And replaced it with what? This?

    I dunno about you, but I don't go anywhere unless my hair's in pigtails!



  • @bstorer said:

    @danixdefcon5 said:
    Hey, at least Hackers broke the "geeky kid" image that Revenge of the Nerds imposed upon most CS folks!

    And replaced it with what? This?

    I dunno about you, but I don't go anywhere unless my hair's in pigtails!

    I always wear my hair like that.  It's more aerodynamic that way, allowing you to surf on the Information Superhighway more faster than other hackers. 



  • @Mr_Bad_Example said:

    *(They stopped making baby oil out of actual babies in the early 1900s.)

     

     

     Been saying that'd lead to overpopulation since the early 1910s. And here we are, 6.5 billion and growing!



  • @marakai said:

    @Mr_Bad_Example said:

    *(They stopped making baby oil out of actual babies in the early 1900s.)

     

     

     Been saying that'd lead to overpopulation since the early 1910s. And here we are, 6.5 billion and growing!

    Humanity > 32-bit integers

    Wonder ir we'll overflow at 9,223,372,036,854,775,807.



  • @morbiuswilters said:

    I always wear my hair like that.

    Yes, but you also skip instead of walking, and hug your dolly when you're sad. Also, you wear a dress and insist that we call you morbina. So, to summarize, are we having that tea party on Friday after we hack the planet?


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to What the Daily WTF? was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.