Return of plz e-mail me teh codez



  • I saw this post on cboard.cprogramming.com and got a sense of deja vu. What is it with people trying to do this?

    For txt msg spam?




  • please sent it to me.  Thanks in advance
    deja vu indeed!  It's like this is some kind of meme, and I don't mean the funny sort.



  • HA!

     

    I don't want to write an automated tool to spam people via. sms, but can you write one for me and have me profit from it? K tnx bye!



  • Perhaps failure to send teh codez is among a small number of reasons that SMS spam is infrequent?  When this secret is unveiled, we may be in trouble. 



  • C++ seems like some major overkill too.  Surely some lazy php or vb app could do this a lot more easily. 



  • Sadly, this sort of shit keeps popping up everywhere.

    e.g. Some comedy gold on the ArsTechnica forums



  • @Soviut said:

    C++ seems like some major overkill too.  Surely some lazy php or vb app could do this a lot more easily.
    Agreed. Just use email

    [quote user="first result on Google for "t-mobile sms email"]T-Mobile:phonenumber@tmomail.net
    Virgin Mobile:phonenumber@vmobl.com
    Cingular:phonenumber@cingularme.com
    Sprint:phonenumber@messaging.sprintpcs.com
    Verizon: phonenumber@vtext.com
    Nextel: phonenumber@messaging.nextel.com[/quote]

    What if you want to spam more people than those on the most popular networks?  There's a not-so-handy utility called kannel.  I don't know much about it, but we (at my last job) had a usb "phone" hooked up to it which we used to send text messages.



  • I think.NET would be the easiest way todo this using the web client class.

    Next we can use C++ to make a program that accepts TCP connections on port 80 so you can connect then get information in a XML type format through a higher random port and then render the contents to show the user! Plz send teh codz of an example that does exacly what I said so I can rename the varriables and claim it is my codz. Then I can send it to my client/ finish my homework/ sell for $900.



  • @drinkingbird said:

    Sadly, this sort of shit keeps popping up everywhere.

    e.g. Some comedy gold on the ArsTechnica forums

     

     This is pretty much every thread at the sun java forums. 50% of the requests are barely-intelligible pseudo-English requests for complicated help by people with names such as "Supreeth Vennharavan". 49% of the requests are incomprehensible requests for someone to complete their homework, with only a verbatim description of the assignment itself and no work or code shown. The other 1% are moderately interesting, but the signal to noise ratio of stuff like this is fantastically high, and probably that way on almost every technical forum. That arstechnica one isn't all that special compared to the monumental tantrums from overentitled illiterate children that I've seen.

     

    Cool, I only had to refresh the page 5 times to get the editor to initialize so I could quote something. Quality! 



  • @Nether said:

    Cool, I only had to refresh the page 5 times to get the editor to initialize so I could quote something. Quality
     

    a) Be patient and wait for it to finish loading.

    b) Get a better connection.

    c) Get a real browser.



  • @MasterPlanSoftware said:

    @Nether said:

    Cool, I only had to refresh the page 5 times to get the editor to initialize so I could quote something. Quality
     

    a) Be patient and wait for it to finish loading.

    b) Get a better connection.

    c) Get a real browser.

    Actually it happens with multiple browsers under different circumstances on a variety of entirely different systems with different tiers of fiber connections.

    Or were you just trolling?



  • @belgariontheking said:

    Agreed. Just use email
     

    In certain places, where the sender/caller always and the recipient never pays, these things don't exist. There are websites though that offer (usually a very limited number of) free SMS gateways that are financed through advertising (or paid for by a subscription.) I've actually seen people write frontends for these sites to make them less painful to use. As you can imagine, their primary goal is getting banner impressions not sending SMS.

    So, this might not neccesarily be a spammer. Just most likely :) 



  • Speaking of deja vu ... this is a whole lot like fax spamming.

    I can see for miles and miles and miles of seas of attorneys  ..

    Oh the anticipation of who will be the recipient of the $1,000,000 fine/5 year prison term/SMS Spamming Poster Boy ...

     



  • @Nether said:

    Actually it happens with multiple browsers under different circumstances on a variety of entirely different systems with different tiers of fiber connections.
     

    Then you are doing it wrong.

     

    Evidence: Look at the number of posts in the forums everyday.



  • @Nether said:

    Actually it happens with multiple browsers under different circumstances on a variety of entirely different systems with different tiers of fiber connections.

    I got it! 5-year old computers can't handle the 1MB that is a TDWTF page. Upgrade the computers.



  • In Europe donesen't the sender/caller pay the full bill of both sending and receiving?[1]

     

    [1] Citation needed




  • I dont know about Europe, but in New Zealand, it's free to receive calls and messages, but you pay to send both.

    I was very surprised when I found out it worked any other way anywhere else - paying to receive texts? Screw that!



  • @dlikhten said:

    [1] Citation needed
     

    The situation in Germany is the same as in New Zealand. Answering a phone never incurrs a charge. Neither does receiving a SMS.

    The US market boggles my mind. The caller may be charged for a call, but most likely has free local calling which, strangely enough, includes cell phone numbers. Not so in Germany, there are dedicated "area" codes for the various cell providers, and the caller is charged the apropriate rate for dialing into the network.. much like long distance calling.

    Then, in the US, the callee may or may not be charged, depending on his plan and his "minutes", which are deducted every time the phone is used. So, thanks to this brilliant scheme, both ends of a phone call may be paying by the minute. Long live capitalism. 



  • @Nandurius said:

    @dlikhten said:

    [1] Citation needed
     

    The situation in Germany is the same as in New Zealand. Answering a phone *never* incurrs a charge. Neither does receiving a SMS.

    .

    So is here in Mexico (almost), but you still can get charged for receiving calls in some cases. Getting an SMS is free though. The cases are:

    1 - Receive local call, mobile user in home city: No charge, caller pays; must dial 044+full 10-digit phone number.

    2 - Receive out-of-city/country/whatever call, mobile user in home city: No charge, caller pays; must dial 045+full 10-digit phone number.

    3 - Receive any call, mobile user not in home city: You'll be charged by the minute for roaming charges. Whoever called you is also paying. Yuck.

    At least we have no charges for case number 2, before the "045" prefix implementation, the charge would fall on the mobile user. Oops!



  •  In the UK, answering a call very rarely incurs a charge, when the caller has asked to make a 'reverse charge' call (like a collect call in the US). This can easily be done by calling the operator. The recipient must explicitly accept the charge. There was a heavily-promoted commercial service a while back which is now being investigated for not having told recipients what the charges were (they were extortionate).

    Business running freephone numbers will also have to pay for the calls they recieve.

    Recieving an ordinary text usually doesn't cost anything, however there are reverse charge texts, usually used for automated services (for example as a way to bill for ringtones). Sending unsolicited such texts will incur the wrath of the authorities and get you shut down quickly.

    The exception is if you take your phone abroad, or presumably if you are a foreigner using your own mobile in the UK.



  • Maybe the situation has changed a bit, but a few years ago, websites run by telcos could easily offer free SMS messages, since the network operators didn't charge each other for SMS messages. Face it: An SMS message is about the smallest piece of data you could send at all over a cellular network. A second of speech takes much more bandwith. Of course customers who send messages from their cell phones have to pay, but that's just a part of the business plan. It's not like they are causing any actual cost to the network operator or taking up any mentionale fraction of bandwith.

    Here in Austria, the situation is that most networks offer flat fee contracts; for 20-25€ per month, all calls (up to e.g. 1000 minutes) are free to all domestic networks, including the fixed line network. Obvious exceptions: Foreign calls, roaming, value-added services. And, you guess it, sending SMS messages. Though it's rather stupid and cumbersome to send a message when voice calls are free, people still do it.

    (Receiving is always free, except when roaming; roaming defined as "using the phone in the network of another country")


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