Math is the universal language.



  • When you design a localization scheme, one of the first problems you have to tackle is how to name your strings.  English phrases themselves are by far the most common method of naming localized phrases.  For instance:

    RecordDeleteWarning

    WelcomeScreenHeader

    But, clearly, that won't suffice for truly Enterprisey software.  Clearly we need something that is not going to be tied to the original language of development.  How about sequential integers?  1, 2, ..., 453.  That would work, right?  Well, I guess the "natural" numbers may not really be universal because there is no such thing as discrete integers in nature.

    That explains why we see localized strings identified with large negative floating-point numbers, like:

    -1128273436.144976 



  • @djork said:

    When you design a localization scheme, one of the first problems you have to tackle is how to name your strings.  English phrases themselves are by far the most common method of naming localized phrases.  For instance:

    RecordDeleteWarning

    WelcomeScreenHeader

    But, clearly, that won't suffice for truly Enterprisey software.  Clearly we need something that is not going to be tied to the original language of development.  How about sequential integers?  1, 2, ..., 453.  That would work, right?  Well, I guess the "natural" numbers may not really be universal because there is no such thing as discrete integers in nature.

    That explains why we see localized strings identified with large negative floating-point numbers, like:

    -1128273436.144976 

     

     

    k.



  • GUIDs are the way to go.  GUIDs are the wave of the future.  All hail the mighty GUID.



  • @djork said:

    localized strings identified with large negative floating-point numbers, like:

    -1128273436.144976 

    Likely reverse-generated from some string => binary => signedFloat



  • You may think it's silly now, but it will come in very handy when you decide you need to randomize or sort the messages on each page. 

    <hints id="hah_hints"></hints>



  • -564235.548688



  •  The REAL WTF was not using MD5.



  • 42 !



  • @snoofle said:

    42 !
     

    NaN 



  •  @snoofle said:

    42 !

     Syntax Error: ! operator used incorrectly. [Line 001:4]



  • @Aaron said:

    You may think it's silly now, but it will come in very handy when you decide you need to randomize or sort the messages on each page. 

    I suppose all the localisation strings for all the aps are in a single file?  Or did you just video them in?


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